The Future of HIM in Healthcare Organizations.

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timer Asked: Dec 11th, 2018
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Read pages 10–23 of the Health Information Management Reimagined (HIMR) White Paper Draft. (attached). Write two paragraphs (5–6 sentences each) sharing your thoughts and ideas about this section of the white paper. What are some of the main points that caught your attention about the white paper? What surprised you as you dissected the white paper? Were there some areas that were difficult to interpret? If so, please explain those areas.

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W H I TE PAPER MADE POSSIBLE IN PART BY ©2017 by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA). No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission from AHIMA, 233 N. Michigan Ave., 21st Fl., Attn: Permissions, Chicago, IL, 60601 or www.ahima.org/reprint WHITEPAPER TABLE OF CONTENTS Health Information Management Reimagined (HIMR) Foreword:........................................... 2 HIM Reimagined (HIMR): Executive Summary................................................................................ 4 HIM Reimagined: A Framework for Transforming Health Information Management....... 7 Scanning the Healthcare Landscape............................................................................................ 8 Preventative..................................................................................................................................... 9 Predictive.......................................................................................................................................... 9 Participatory.................................................................................................................................. 10 Personalized....................................................................................................................................11 Trends in Higher Education..............................................................................................................11 Workforce Changes............................................................................................................................12 Supporting Rationale...............................................................................................................................15 Conclusion...................................................................................................................................................26 AHIMA.ORG WHITEPAPER HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT REIMAGINED (HIMR) FOREWORD: This document is the result of the hard work, commitment, and forward thinking of a team of passionate and dedicated HIM professionals who spent hundreds of hours assessing the current and projected future landscape of the healthcare industry and higher education systems. HIMR is a national initiative and does not make recommendations that are applicable outside the United States. Using the knowledge gained from this assessment, the team has proposed recommendations for consideration. HIMR is an iterative document that provides the framework for continual assessment and improvement of the processes in place to ensure effective delivery of HIM education in a time of rapid change. Continual evaluation of industry changes must inform the need for additional iterative changes to this guiding document. HIMR is, by design, future-focused and likely does not reflect what many readers are currently observing in their workplace settings. The recommendations in this document are bold and ambitious, and at the same time hold promise for future advancement of the HIM profession. Because of the significant nature of these recommendations, a 10-year, phased implementation plan starting in 2017 is proposed. Those reading this document will appreciate the significant and progressive change initiatives that must accompany these efforts to ensure the HIM profession is prepared to take advantage of the many opportunities and challenges facing us as we move toward the ambitious goals outlined in this document. Bill Gates has suggested that “we always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next ten. Don’t let yourself be lulled into inaction” (BrainyQuote). This quote helps to frame the difficult nature of describing technology impacts on a changing profession. A final and important consideration is the need for readers to evaluate any current fears and apprehensions. Fear can often lead to stagnation. Replacing these sensitivities with action allows one to complete the mission at hand. HIMR is geared to move both individuals and the profession forward. Transformation starts with you! With sincere appreciation and grateful acknowledgement of: HIM REIMAGINED (HIMR) PRIMARY TASKFORCE MEMBERS Ryan Sandefer, PhD, Chair HIMR Taskforce (2016), Co-Chair HIMR Taskforce (2017) Chair & Assistant Professor, The College of St. Scholastica Michelle Millen, MSCPM, RHIT, Chair HIMR Taskforce (2017), Director, Health Information Management, Collin College Marcia Sharp, EdD, RHIA, Co-Chair HIMR Taskforce (2016, 2017), Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director, UT Health Science Center Kelly Abrams, PhD, CHIM, Vice President, Canadian College of Health Information Management Sheila Carlon, PhD, RHIA, CHPS, FAHIMA, Health Information Management Department Chair, Regis University Ann Chenoweth, MBA, RHIA, FAHIMA, AHIMA Board Liaison (2016), Senior Director, Industry Relations, 3M Health Information Systems Mary Beth Haugen, MS, RHIA, Consultant, Haugen Consulting Group Ellen Karl, MBA, RHIA, CHDA, FAHIMA, AHIMA Board Liaison (2017), Academic Director, Health Information Management Program, City University of New York Desla Mancilla, DHA, RHIA, VP Academic Affairs & Certification, AHIMA Kyle McElroy, MS-HSA, RHIA, AVP, Health Information Management, IASIS Healthcare Connie Renda, MA, RHIA, CHDA, Associate Professor and Program Director, San Diego Mesa College Linda Sorensen, RHIA, CHPS, Department Chair, Davenport University 2 | AHIMA WHITEPAPER COUNCIL FOR EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION (CEE) MEMBERS Sandra Brightwell, MEd, RHIA Dilhari DeAlmeida, PhD, RHIA Susan Fenton, PhD, RHIA, FAHIMA Susie T. Harris, PhD, MBA, RHIA, CCS Neisa Jenkins, EdD, RHIA David Marc, PhD, CHDA Michelle Millen, MSCPM, RHIT Kelly Miller, MA, RHIA, CPHIMS Keith Olenik, MA, RHIA, CHP LisaRae Roper, MHA, MS, CCS-P, CPC, CPC-I, PCS Ryan Sandefer, PhD Beth Shanholtzer, MAEd, RHIA, FAHIMA Marcia Sharp, EdD, RHIA Julie Shay, RHIA RoseAnn Webb, MNM, LHRM, RHIA, CHPS, FAHIMA Bonnie Wilkins, MHIM, RHIAA INVITED FIRST ITERATION REVIEWERS AND COMMENTERS AHIMA Board of Directors CCHIIM Board of Directors AHIMA Foundation Board of Directors AHIMA Staff Leadership AHIMA HIM Credentialed Staff CAHIIM Board of Directors AHIMA House of Delegates and CSA Leader Representatives AHIMA Assembly on Education/Faculty Development Institute Attendees HIM Educators AHIMA Leadership Symposium Attendees Workforce Representatives (special invitations to selected members of CHIME, HFMA, HIMSS) 3 | AHIMA WHITEPAPER HIM REIMAGINED (HIMR): EXECUTIVE SUMMARY HIM Reimagined is a future-focused initiative and proposes bold recommendations to ensure the continued vitality of the HIM profession in a rapidly changing healthcare environment. The Health Information Management Profession is at a critical juncture, where all choices involve risk and reward. We must choose between significantly revising the traditional approach to HIM education and continuing on with what we have done in the past. In the healthcare industry today, the skills and abilities of Registered Health Information Technicians (RHIT) and Registered Health Information Administrators (RHIA) are recognized and valued. The HIM profession is likely best known for its expertise and leadership in the coding arena. HIM professionals also lead the way in healthcare privacy matters. These two primary facets set the HIM profession apart from other healthcare professionals. The longtime role of the HIM professional as the bridge between the clinical, financial, technological, and administrative healthcare functions is facilitated by the broad content included in the existing HIM curriculum. Today, HIM professionals practice in almost every operational area of traditional healthcare (hospital) settings including quality improvement, revenue cycle, risk management, contract management, financial management, data management, project management, information technology, administration, and others. Beyond hospitals, HIM professionals are found in almost every setting imaginable including outpatient, academic, vendor, pharmaceutical, research, and government settings. Many HIM program graduates are securing jobs, and current practitioners are finding opportunities in a wide variety of roles and settings. A future focused analysis of the changing healthcare environment, HIMR outlines the anticipated changes in healthcare and how those changes will likely affect the HIM profession. For example, preventative, predictive, participatory, and personalized approaches to medicine, increased automation, and aging of the population will all have a significant impact on HIM operations and what employers will need of HIM professionals in the future. To be prepared for these changes, the HIM profession must work diligently now for when these anticipated changes emerge. We believe all HIM roles will evolve as workflows adapt to technology. The HIM foundational core will serve as the North Star, providing guidance as the profession navigates uncharted water. As new opportunities emerge, HIM professionals may need additional education and skills development to perform in new roles. Traditional HIM roles are already evolving as we have seen coding start to shift to an audit function with the use of computer assisted coding (CAC) technology. Currently, AHIMA membership data suggests nearly half of HIM professionals who enter the profession do so in a coding-related role. As organizations become more electronically linked and tools become more efficient, an entry-level coding role may no longer be an opportunity widely available to all. This in no way means that HIM professionals will not still need to learn coding in school. This need will still exist in order to be able to relate coding to reimbursement, case finding, and for other important reasons; however, the amount of coding may vary from what is present today in HIM programs. In addition, there may be a need for higher level skills built around coding concepts to ensure HIM professionals are available and ready to fill higher level auditing positions. There is also concern around the eroding niche market of HIM as other professionals (e.g., IT, nurses) with competence in our traditional areas of practice are edging into what was previously seen as HIM space. There are those who feel this analysis of coding is off the mark and that little to no significant change will arise in coding-related positions. As evidence, one may point to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics currently calling for a 15% increase in jobs for health information technicians between 2014 and 2024 (Healthcare Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014). Why does HIMR suggest a different future for coding professionals given this information? One need not look too far in our past to see how history provides a grim reminder of what happens to industries and professions that fail to maintain relevance in a changing environment. Disruptive technologies act as catalysts in evolving industries, moving those willing to adapt forward and leaving others behind. Blockbuster, Polaroid, Kodak, and Borders serve as examples of organizations unwilling to make the necessary changes to maintain relevance. Many of the disruptions that led to the demise of these reputable organizations happened quickly (and 4 | AHIMA WHITEPAPER in some cases in less than 10 years). The coding function, the value of coding, and its relationship to many other healthcare structures is not in question. The number of rank and file coding positions in the future is where the focus of this discussion centers. HIMR seeks to identify and prepare future professionals with the skills needed to adapt in a changing environment. Yes, auditors and editors will be needed, but the number of auditors, editors, and others is much smaller than the number of day-to-day coders filling positions today. Making significant changes to existing education content to focus on the future instead of the past can lead the HIM profession to a place where it is valued for new and emerging skills, and at two distinct levels. The technical HIM professional level will be specialized, bringing awareness to employers that associate degree-educated HIM professionals have a deep knowledge in a specific area of HIM practice grounded by a solid core foundation of knowledge and skills that all HIM professionals possess. The goal is to prepare practitioners who will focus on operational support in healthcare and healthcare-related organizations. At the baccalaureate and master’s level, HIM professionals will practice at a broader level, assimilating data from multiple sources, creating knowledge, and leading healthcare organizations to use their health data assets to their best advantage for the benefit of the organization, patient, and population. To this end, what follows are the recommendations proposed in HIMR. This executive summary is followed by the full HIMR document where references, data, information, and research that have led to these recommendations are included. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Increase the number of AHIMA members who hold relevant graduate degrees, (e.g., HIM, Health Informatics, MBA, MD, MEd, MPH) to 20 percent of total membership within 10 years. A. Increase funding of academic scholarships to foster access to higher levels of HIM education to members. B. Increase the number of faculty qualified to teach HIM and related graduate education. C. Implement graduate-level health informatics curriculum competencies to improve the value of and increase demand for health informatics graduate education. These competencies have been developed and will be adopted by schools to assist in supporting this goal. 2. In collaboration with other health and health-related organizations, in the public and private sectors, build a mechanism to ensure availability of research that supports health informatics and information management. A. Provide competitive research grants on an annual basis aimed at promoting health informatics and information management practice. B. Provide dissertation scholarships to health information management and health informatics professionals conducting research in doctoral programs. C. Focus on research to support the value of HIM skills and the need for data analytics to manage data for strategic, fiscal, and population health purposes. 3. Increase the opportunities for specialization across all levels of the HIM academic spectrum through curricula revision, while retaining a broad foundation in health information management and analytics. A. Curriculum revisions to support specialization at the associate level (timeline: new curriculum available for use by August 2019 or earlier, although required implementation date will likely be 2021 or later). i. Condensed HIM core at associate level and incorporate specialization opportunities at student and program level. The core will include content from all domains, and the number of competencies in the nonspecialty content area will be significantly reduced. ii.  Align HIM accredited academic specialties with future HIM-related credentials; consider and encourage higher level education to achieve higher salaries. iii. Focus effort on creating tracks at two-year program level based on emerging specialties as indicated by employer need (and to be determined by market research in 2017). Program accreditation continues, as does the associate level degree, but it is based on a condensed set of HIM core content and deeper specialty content. Each school determines an appropriate specialty track or the appropriate number of tracks for their program and their regional market needs. 5 | AHIMA WHITEPAPER B. Broader HIM core at baccalaureate level i. Align core HIM competencies with requirements for HIM credential maintenance. C. Condensed core at Master’s Health Informatics and Health Information Management with specialization opportunities at program level. 4. RHIA credential is recognized as the standard for HIM generalist practice and the RHIT (+Specialty) as the technical level of practice. A. Transition the RHIT credential to a specialty focused associate level over a multi-year, multi-phased approach. i. January 2017–July 2021: Current and new RHITs (those who receive the RHIT designation by July 2021) permanently retain RHIT credential. ii. Ongoing transition support for RHITs who want to transition to the RHIA credential will be provided (2017–2027). For example, consider a new opportunity for RHIA certification through a proviso approach that would allow individuals with a baccalaureate degree, who are also currently RHITcertified, to take the RHIA exam for a specified period of time consistent with the recommendations of the HIMR taskforce and CCHIIM approval. iii. August 2021–December 2026: Transition of RHIT credential from RHIT to RHIT + (Specialty Designation). a. Develop and distribute materials to communicate this transition to the market. B. Ensure clear pathways exist between associate and baccalaureate HIM programs to encourage existing HIM professionals and new entrants to the HIM profession to earn a baccalaureate degree and a RHIA credential. i. Increase from the existing 26 percent to 40 percent of the current technical level; membership will advance to a minimum of a baccalaureate degree by 2027. ii. Curriculum must be designed to allow seamless transitions from the associate level to the baccalaureate and from the baccalaureate to the master’s level. iii. Focus efforts on recruitment to illustrate the value of higher academic preparation. iv. Provide support to educational institutions to transition programs, as appropriate and when possible, from associate level to baccalaureate level and from baccalaureate to master’s level. C. Align certification processes with industry and education needs. i. Ensure certification examination process supports the ability of HIM to be more quickly aligned with future industry needs. ii. Align CEU requirements with future-focused employer needs that ensure the recognition of the HIM profession. The AHIMA Vision 2016 white paper, released in 2007, proposed similar recommendations, however the HIMR recommendations have been re-focused based on new knowledge that has emerged. The conclusion of the Vision 2016 white paper included a call to action, citing that it was “time to reach a consensus and take steps to advance HIM education and develop more qualified faculty is now. If we further delay, it will pass us by.” This call to action was loud, yet stopped short of making the important connection between education and the HIM profession as a whole. In retrospect, the progressive tone of Vision 2016 at the time was probably too early for many to “see” the world that was envisioned. Major distinctions from the previous Vision 2016 initiative and its successor, Reality 2016, and HIMR are noted. One such distinction is that the passage of time has made it clear that technology is rapidly advancing to the point where current HIM roles will be performed by computers in the future. According to a 2016 quarterly McKinsey report, “Where Machines Could Replace Humans,” the roles particularly vulnerable to automation are those that involve performing physical activities in a predictable environment. According to the report, there is an “observed tendency for higher rates of automation for activities common in some middle-skill jobs—for example in data collection and data processing” (2016). These important observations support the need for the changes outlined herein. 6 | AHIMA WHITEPAPER AHIMA will continue to support and encourage its members to buil ...
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Running head: TECHNOLOGY IN HEALTH CARE

TECHNOLOGY IN HEALTH CARE

NAME:

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TECHNOLOGY IN HEALTH CARE

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Technology in health care
Thoughts on the white paper section
Technological advancement in health will help in disease prevention. This is because it can help
in early disease detection. Also it will improve the involvement of the practitioner and patient in
healthcare. The patient can be able to know what they are ailing from without necessarily being
in a hospital. This can be th...

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