Exam for Introduction to Climate Model

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Final exam of a course about introduction of the climate model.This class will provide a broad introduction to climate modeling with an emphasis on past climate reconstruction and future climate projections. Students will learn fundamental modeling concepts, run several kinds of models, and gain experience reading and evaluating modeling papers.

EARTH 106/206. Introduction to Climate Modeling Course Goals: This class will provide a broad introduction to climate modeling with an emphasis on past climate reconstruction and future climate projections. Students will learn fundamental modeling concepts, run several kinds of models, and gain experience reading and evaluating modeling papers. Pre-reqs: At least one climate-related class. Undergrads encouraged to have had or be concurrently enrolled in Math 4B. No previous modeling or programming experience is required. Instructor: Professor Lorraine Lisiecki, lisiecki@geol.ucsb.edu, Webb Hall 2113 Office Hours: Tues 1-2pm (or by appointment) TA: Rachel Spratt, rachelspratt@umail.ucsb.edu, Noble Annex 1019 Office Hours: TBA (or by appointment) Required textbook: A Climate Modelling Primer (4th ed.) by McGuffie and Henderson-Sellers Lab Sections: Tuesday 12:30-1:45 or 2-3:15 in Webb 1015 (Mac lab). Labs begin Oct. 9. Class schedule: Oct 1: Course Intro (No lab on Oct. 2.) Oct 3 – 16: Energy Balance Models Oct 17 – 23: Glacial Cycles Oct 24 – Nov 7: Box models: Ocean biogeochemistry & carbon cycle Nov 6 – 27: General Circulation Models (GCMs) (Holiday - Nov 12) Nov 26: Guest Lecture by Prof. Qinghua Ding Nov. 28: Climate change projections & uncertainties Dec 1 – 5: Class presentations (during lecture & lab) Research Papers Due: Nov 26, Revisions: Dec 7 Grading: Preparation (pre-class questions) Participation (in-class activities) Labs Research paper/presentation “Take-home” final exam 10% 15% 40% 25% 10% Graduate credit (enrollment in 206) requires these additional activities: - Performing supplemental lab experiments and answering additional lab questions - Longer research paper and presentation Pre-class questions: These questions will cover material from the assigned reading. Answers must be submitted on GauchoSpace the night before each lecture. The purpose is to make sure you do the required reading before class, so that you will be prepared to discuss the material and ask questions during class. It also allows me to tailor lectures to address misunderstandings and questions. About half of this grade will be based on effort and half on whether answers are correct. The lowest grade of the quarter will be dropped. Participation: In-class activities and discussions require that you complete the assigned reading before class. Team activities and class discussions are important components of learning the course material. Grading for this component of the class is based on participation. Each student will be allowed one absence/missed activity during the quarter. Any additional missed work will require a doctor’s note and/or must be pre-arranged with the professor. Labs: Many labs will require more than 50 minutes to complete. The TA will stay in lab an extra 30 minutes to help students finish. If you cannot stay late, you can complete labs on your own. Labs are due 1 week after assigned. Labs will not be accepted more than one week late unless the professor gives prior approval for extenuating circumstances. Late penalty: -2 pts/day (maximum allowed is 7 days late). Students will not be excused from submitting labs for illness or travel. If you cannot attend the assigned lab time, you must inform the TA in advance with a valid excuse, and you will be expected to complete the assignment on your own. Research paper and presentation: This assignment gives you the opportunity to learn more about a topic that is personally interesting to you. As part of this assignment, you will demonstrate the ability to read, interpret, and explain journal articles about climate modeling. The course’s assigned readings and activities are designed to help prepare you for this “capstone” project. Final exam: This is a “take home” exam to be completed on GauchoSpace any time during finals week. It will consist of ~10 discussion questions. Excused absences and missed work: The policy of dropping the lowest quiz and participation/activity score is designed to “excuse” one instance of illness, technical trouble with GauchoSpace, etc. Allowances for additional missed quizzes or class activities must be arranged with the professor in advance. Students will not be excused from submitting labs for any reason. If you cannot attend the assigned lab time, you must inform the TA in advance, and you will be expected to complete the assignment on your own. Labs will not be accepted more than one week late unless the professor gives prior approval for extenuating circumstances.

Tutor Answer

Fleming51
School: University of Maryland

Attached.

Environmental Science
Question 1
a. Define the term ‘model parameter’
A model parameter is a characteristic that can help in defining a particular system or in
explaining the relationships existing between quantities that can be measured independently in a
given experiment. Essentially, the model parameters are the values to be assessed through the
modeling process.
b. Why do models have parameters? Why are they important?
Parameters help in building the relationships between inputs and outputs in a given model.
Hence, parameters are important since they offer the constraints which define a model, its
functionalities and its operability.
Question 2
a. Why is it particularly important to study and understand feedbacks in the climate system?
It is important to study and understand feedbacks in the climate system in order to understand
global warming since feedback processes diminish or amplify the effect of each climate forcing.
In this case, it becomes easier to understand the factors affecting the climate system and hence if
the feedback is negative, it can be addressed accordingly.
b. Two examples of important climate feedbacks
Decomposition – this is a positive feedback since the decomposition of organic matter stored in
permafrost generates heat in response to the melting of the permafrost.
Chemical weathering – this is a posit...

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Anonymous
Good stuff. Would use again.

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