Minimum word count: 750 Maximum word count: 1500

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Question Description

How and in what ways are varieties of non-academic or non-standard English discredited in academic settings? Is the discredit of non-standard English varieties harmful? Why or why not? Cite at least three reading packet sources in your essay response.

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Modern  Language  Association   UMKC  Writing  Studio   816-­‐235-­‐1146   writingstudio@umkc.edu   www.umkc.edu/writingstudio   MLA  Style  (Eighth  Edition)       The following is a summary of MLA Style standards relevant to RooWriter submissions. For other projects, please consult the MLA Style Manual and the Writing Studio’s website for more comprehensive guidelines. Citing Sources “To document” means to tell the reader the source of any material a writer uses in his or her essay. Material needing documentation includes facts, statistical data, and ideas as well as the words used to express such information. Writers need to document, or cite, sources whether or not they are using the exact words of the original. If using any of the exact words (even just a phrase), writers need to put quotation marks around those words in addition to citing the source. Failure to use quotation marks appropriately constitutes plagiarism. For prose, writers need to find the author and page number of a work (Smith 76), but for poetry, writers need the author and the line numbers (Poe 15-17). When working with dramas, writers need to introduce the author in the text before a quotation and need to provide the play title and line numbers in the parenthetical citation (Hamlet 15-17). MLA has special rules for short and long quotes. Short Quotations (4 typed lines or less): Place the quote within the text of the paper. Introduce the quote with a comma, and place the period after the parenthetical citation. Use quotation marks to show all borrowed material. Include author and page number. Block Quotations (More than 4 typed lines): Place the quote one inch from the left margin, and omit quotation marks. Introduce the quote with a colon, and place the period before the parenthetical citation. Same author of multiple works: When this occurs, group the works by the same author together, and alphabetize by the first word of the title. At the beginning of the second and subsequent works, use three dashes instead of writing the author’s name. Ex. - - -. In the paper, distinguish between the works by putting the first few words of the title in the parenthetical citation before the page number. No author: If no author is available, leave it out and alphabetize the works cited list by the first key word in the title. (Key words do not include “A,” “An,” and “The.”) In the paper, use the first key word of the title when citing. Ex. (Art 76). Missing Information: If a piece of information for a works cited entry is not available, skip that piece and move on to remaining information. Electronic sources often lack page numbers. If the electric source uses paragraph numbers (par. or pars.) or screens numbers (screens), use this information in place of a page number. For more information, consult the MLA Handbook. Multiple authors: When citing multiple authors internally, use a semicolon between internal citations. Ex. (Smith 45; Logan 22-23). Documents on Websites or in Databases: MLA Style uses the concept of “containers” to discuss the holding location of a source. A databases generally is considered a container, not a publisher; however, a website may be considered primarily as a publisher depending on their role in the production of the source. For instance, YouTube is typically considered to be a container for videos; however, NASA could be both a publisher and a container for a video. View the MLA Center’s “Works Cited: A Quick Guide” at https://style.mla.org for examples and more information about this an other aspects of citing electronic sources.       Constructing  Works  Cited  Entries     MLA’s  8th  Edition  uses  the  same  citation  style  for  all  types  of  sources,  universally.  Much  of  this  relies  on  the  idea  of   “containers,”  which  might  refer  to  a  book,  academic  journal,  collection,  archive,  database,  CD,  website,  or  any  number   of  different  types  of  sources.     Because  the  template  is  meant  to  be  used  for  all  types  of  sources,  use  your  discretion  when  determining  what  pieces  of   information  to  place  emphasis  on.  For  example,  you  might  list  the  author  of  a  film  as  the  director  if  you  mean  to   emphasize  how  the  film  was  made,  but  you  might  list  the  author  as  the  lead  actor  if  you  mean  to  emphasize  a  specific   performance.     For  every  external  citation,  only  include  the  information  that  you  have  regarding  the  source.  If  there  isn’t  a  secondary   container  (such  as  an  archive,  database,  or  collection  where  you  found  the  source),  then  you  wouldn’t  include  any   information  regarding  Container  2.     Works  Cited  Entry  Template         Only  fill  in  the  elements  that  are  available.   Last Name, First Name. “Title of Source.” Title of Container 1, Other Contributors, Version, Number, Publisher, Publication date, Location. Title of Container 2, Other Contributors for Container 2, Version for Container 2, Number of Container 2, Publisher for Container 2, Publication date of Container 2, Location of Container 2.     Example   Lorensen, Jutta. “Between Image and Word, Color, and Time: Jacob Lawrence’s The Migration Series.” African American Review, vol. 40, no. 3, 2006, pp. 571-86. EBSCOHost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct= true&db=f5h&AN=24093790&site=ehost-live. Formatting  and  Organizing  the  Works  Cited   Alphabetize works cited lists and bibliographies by author’s last name and/or first key word of the title. Indent the second and subsequent lines of entries half an inch from the left margin. Additional MLA Resources MLA  Style  Center:  http://style.mla.org   Purdue  Owl-­‐  MLA:  https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/   Bedford  St.  Martin’s-­‐MLA:  http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/RES5e_ch08_o.html   RooWriter Essay Expectations & Instructions You may take the RooWriter as many times as you wish throughout your academic career at UMKC, and each time you submit an essay you will receive evaluative comments in order to help you work toward ever better writing skills. Read critically and write well! [roowriter@umkc.edu] If you have a documented disability and need academic accommodations to take the RooWriter please contact the UMKC Office of Services for Students with Disabilities at (816) 235-5696 or (816) 235-5672, or email disability@umkc.edu. MINIMAL ESSAY REQUIREMENTS        See below for expanded details Read ALL the articles in your chosen Reading Packet. We will assume that you have done so. You MUST write your essay in response to the prompt (question) assigned to you when you “Start Essay.” You MUST cite within your essay from at least 3 of the 5-7 different URL sources in your chosen Reading Packet. You MUST use the Reading Packet sources to develop your argument. You MUST complete the “Works Cited” box for all sources you use within your essay. You may NOT use or cite any sources outside of those in your Reading Packet. You MUST follow the directions “When writing your essay” that appear on the essay writing web page. BEFORE YOU CLICK ON “START ESSAY”         Analyze the readings & organize your thoughts Log in to the RooWriter web site. Review this document (RooWriter Essay Expectations) & the Evaluation Rubric (the 6 scales) document. Visit the Reading Packets page, and click on your choice of Reading Packet. Visit the URL web addresses and allow yourself whatever time you need to download all the Reading Packet articles. Log out. Allow yourself several days or more to READ and ANNOTATE all the articles in your chosen Reading Packet in preparation for writing your RooWriter essay. Until you actually click on “Start Essay” and the 72-hour clock begins to count down, you will not receive an essay prompt (essay question) based on your chosen Reading Packet about which to write your essay. However, before you log in again, you can develop central ideas, and a position about the subject matter of your chosen Reading Packet, which will prepare you for whatever prompt you receive. Draft an argument to support your idea/s about the topic. What will convince a reader that your idea/s are valid and interesting? It may be helpful at this point to brainstorm your ideas in a non-linear way, as with a mind map or concept map, e.g., (http://lillypad12c.wikispaces.com/Exam+Revision)    You will be writing an essay between 750-1,500 words in length. The “Works Cited” section is NOT included in this total. Choose a 72-hour (3 day) period convenient for you to write your RooWriter essay. Once the 72-hour clock begins to count down, it runs continuously even when you are offline. Log in and confirm the Reading Packet on which you will write your essay. CLICK ON “START ESSAY” - THE CLOCK STARTS Review your essay prompt & draft your essay      If you are ready to write, click on “Start Essay.” The 72-hour clock will now begin counting down. An essay prompt (essay question) based on your chosen Reading Packet will be assigned to you and appear at the top of the essay page. You must write your essay in response to this prompt. At this point, we recommend you log out, and take time to draft an outline of your essay off line. Think about the prompt, and look back at your mind map or concept map. You may want to revise the concept map. To help you see which of your ideas stand out, you may also want to try a wordle (www.wordle.net) such as the following: The structure of your essay should include      Your introduction with your central idea The body of your essay, which is the development, or the explanation of your ideas, with citations from the articles in your Reading Packet Citations from 3 or more articles in your Reading Packet as they relate to your position on the topic (you may support or refute arguments presented by the Reading Packet authors, but you may not use or cite outside sources) Explanations how the citations you include support your position, and A conclusion that summarizes your argument, and returns to your central idea with new insight. WRITE YOUR ESSAY    Log in, and as the 72-hour period counts down, type your essay in the RooWriter, using your prepared notes and draft. You may log out and log back in during that 72 hour period as you wish, but be sure to SAVE your work each time. (Your work will also be auto-saved frequently.) On each return login, you will be sent directly back to your essay page. Read your essay as you have typed it. Ask yourself:  Can I immediately see the central idea in what I have written?  Do my ideas follow logically? (analysis)  Have I incorporated and explained citations from the articles in my Reading Packet?  Is my argument convincing?  Do I include transition words from one thought and/or paragraph to another?  Does my conclusion not only summarize, but also return to my central idea with new insight? (synthesis)  Is my grammar and my use of academic English correct? (Check your spelling to confirm spell-check.)  Are my citations in the correct format specified by my Reading Packet? Is my “works cited” page complete? SUBMIT YOUR ESSAY    Check your work one last time. Remember: You must use the citation style specified by your choice of Reading Packet. NOTE that you are blocked from starting a new essay more than once every two weeks (14 days). Before the 72 hours end, click SAVE and SUBMIT. When the time runs out, if for some reason you failed to SUBMIT your essay and works cited page, the last auto-saved version will be your submission. 21 June 2013 6 RooWriter Scales __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Point – Purpose - Idea: Generate ideas and communicate a clear point about one’s own perspective on a topic. 6 Excellent 5 Very good 4 Good 3 Fair 2 Poor 1 Unacceptable Exceeds expectations Fully meets expectations Adequately meets expectations Approaches expectations Minimally approaches expectations Does not approach expectations Effectively and insightfully develops a position on the issue. Ideas are purposeful, specific and creative. Presents a wellconsidered position on the issue. Ideas are purposeful and specific. Presents an adequately clear position on the issue. Ideas are purposeful, but may be predictable. Is vague or limited in the development of a position on the issue. Ideas are evident, but may occasionally appear list-like rather than developed. Is unclear or seriously limited in the development of a position on the issue. Ideas are often confusing, often appearing as list-like or incidental. Provides little or no evidence of the ability to develop any coherent position on the issue. Ideas are generally confusing, with pervasive incidental or gratuitous detail. Depth & Breadth of Analysis – Critical Thinking: Examine and analyze the views of others weighed against one’s own point of view. 6 Excellent 5 Very good 4 Good Exceeds expectations Fully meets expectations Demonstrates outstanding skill in elements of summary, interpretation, analysis and/or synthesis. Demonstrates strong skill in elements of summary, interpretation, analysis and/or synthesis. 3 Fair 2 Poor 1 Unacceptable Adequately Approaches meets expectations expectations Minimally approaches expectations Does not approach expectations Demonstrates competent skill in elements of summary, interpretation, analysis and/or synthesis. Demonstrates weakness in management of summary, interpretation, analysis or synthesis. Demonstrates little or no evidence of summary, interpretation, analysis or synthesis. Demonstrates inconsistent management of summary, interpretation, analysis and/or synthesis. 1 Support – Evidence - Citations: Incorporate evidence and ideas from texts, accompanied by appropriate attribution. 6 Excellent 5 Very good 4 Good 3 Fair 2 Poor 1 Unacceptable Exceeds expectations Fully meets expectations Adequately meets expectations Approaches expectations Minimally approaches expectations Does not approach expectations Incorporates evidence with excellent focus and reasoned explanation. Cites evidence with very clear, accurate and appropriate attribution. Incorporates evidence with clear focus and explanation. Cites evidence with clear and appropriate attribution. There may be some minor errors in citation mechanics. Incorporates evidence with adequate focus and explanation. Adequately cites evidence with appropriate attribution. Some minor errors in citation mechanics are apparent. Incorporates some evidence, but with inconsistent focus and/or explanation. Cites evidence, although citations contain errors in attribution and/or accuracy that occasionally cause confusion. Attempts to incorporate some evidence, but has little focus or fails to explain. Cites some evidence, although errors in attribution or accuracy, and/or incomplete citations, cause frequent confusion. Does not incorporate evidence or the evidence provided does not support the author’s ideas. Does not cite evidence, or citation format contains major errors of attribution and accuracy, resulting in incoherency. Style – Audience – Interest: Engage reader with stylistically compelling language. 6 Excellent 5 Very good 4 Good 3 Fair 2 Poor 1 Unacceptable Exceeds expectations Fully meets expectations Adequately meets expectations Approaches expectations Minimally approaches expectations Does not approach expectations Exhibits skillful use of language, using a varied, accurate and apt vocabulary. Demonstrates meaningful variety in sentence structure. Demonstrates an excellent awareness of audience, with tone and formality/informality appropriate to the purpose. Essay is highly compelling. Exhibits facility in the use of language, using appropriate vocabulary and variety in sentence structure. Demonstrates an awareness of audience, with tone and formality/informality appropriate to the purpose. Essay engages reader. Exhibits adequate but inconsistent facility in the use of language, using generally appropriate vocabulary, with some variety in sentence structure. Demonstrates adequate awareness of audience. Tone reflects purpose, but may be inconsistent. Essay contains some passages of narrative that engage the reader. Displays developing facility in the use of language, but sometimes uses weak vocabulary or inappropriate word choice. Lacks variety or demonstrates problems in sentence structure. Demonstrates some awareness of audience. Tone and formality/informality may reflect purpose, but only by use of isolated words or sentences. Essay may lack interest for the reader. Displays very little facility in the use of language, using very limited vocabulary or incorrect word choice, with frequent problems in sentence structure. Demonstrates little awareness of audience. Tone and formality/informality are not appropriate to the purpose and the audience. Essay lacks interest for the reader. Displays fundamental errors in vocabulary with severe flaws in sentence structure. Demonstrates no awareness of audience. Tone and formality/informality are not appropriate to the purpose and the audience. Essay discourages reader interest. 2 Clarity & Cohesion of Structure – Organization: Construct cohesive paragraph and essay structure, with a clear introduction, body and conclusion. 6 Excellent 5 Very good 4 Good 3 Fair 2 Poor 1 Unacceptable Exceeds expectations Fully meets expectations Adequately meets expectations Approaches expectations Minimally approaches expectations Does not approach expectations Sustains a very well-organized, highly focused essay, connecting ideas smoothly and logically, demonstrating very clear coherence and progression. The introduction, body and conclusion are very effectively structured and unified, with a clear sense of resolution. Maintains focus and is generally well-organized, connecting ideas logically, demonstrating coherence and progression. The introduction, body and conclusion are effectively structured and unified, with a sense of resolution. Is adequately focused and organized, presenting ideas with adequate coherence, and reasonable clarity and progression. The introduction, body and conclusion are evident in the essay’s structure, and contribute to unity, but resolution may be obvious. Is sometimes poorly focused and/or poorly organized, with lapses in coherence of ideas. Does not always follow a logical progression of thought. The introduction, body or conclusion is weak or formulaic. Is often unfocused and/or disorganized, with serious flaws in coherence or progression. More than one part of the introduction, body or conclusion contains disjointed narrative, making it difficult to follow the essay. The introduction or conclusion may be missing. Presents little or no evidence of the ability to develop an organized response, resulting in an essay that is overall and throughout seriously disjointed or fully incoherent. Grammar – Usage – Mechanics: Exhibit appr ...
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Drval
School: University of Maryland

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Anonymous
Thanks, good work

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