Roswell High School Dangerous Radiactive Decay Argument

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timer Asked: Jan 16th, 2019
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Question Description

Develop a scientific argument to answer the question: Which type of Radioactive decay; Alpha, Beta or Gamma, is most dangerous. Use the Claims Evidence Reasoning Format. Evidence should be collected from at least three reliable sources and sources should be cited at the end of your argument. It is best to write this a a report and not use the CER template you may be used to.

How to Write a Scientific Explanation Instructions and Examples

Components

  • Make a claim about the problem.
  • Provide evidence for the claim.
  • Provide reasoning that links the evidence to the claim.

Definitions

  • Claim: An assertion or conclusion that answers the original question
  • Evidence: Scientific data that supports the student’s claim that must be appropriate and sufficient. Can come from an investigation or other source such as observations, reading material, archived data, or other source.
  • Reasoning: Justification that links the claim and evidence. Shows why the data counts as evidence to support the claim, using appropriate scientific principles.

Qualities of Communication

Write the explanation so others can understand it.

  • Use precise and accurate scientific language.
  • Write clearly so that anyone interested in the explanation can understand it.
  • Explain your logic to help share your knowledge.

How to Write a Scientific Explanation Instructions and Examples Components • Make a claim about the problem. • Provide evidence for the claim. • Provide reasoning that links the evidence to the claim. Definitions • Claim: An assertion or conclusion that answers the original question • Evidence: Scientific data that supports the student’s claim that must be appropriate and sufficient. Can come from an investigation or other source such as observations, reading material, archived data, or other source. • Reasoning: Justification that links the claim and evidence. Shows why the data counts as evidence to support the claim, using appropriate scientific principles. Qualities of Communication Write the explanation so others can understand it. ✓ Use precise and accurate scientific language. ✓ Write clearly so that anyone interested in the explanation can understand it. ✓ Explain your logic to help share your knowledge. Explanation Tool Layout The Question: Initial question based on an observed phenomenon or situation. Our Claim: Your claim is a statement that expresses the answer or conclusion to the question. Our Evidence: Our Justification (Reasoning) of the Evidence: Your evidence should always include Your justification explains why the evidence collected data (Numbers!) and/or observations. Organize numerical data supports the claim. Provide a logical connection between the evidence and claim into table or graphs when appropriate using valid scientific principles. Examples of Claim, Evidence, and Reasoning (in order of increasing complexity) Example 1 Question: What do plants need to grow? Claim: The plant that received more light grew taller. Evidence: Justification of the Evidence: The plant with 24 hours of light grew 20 cm. The plant with 12 hours of light only grew 8 cm. Plants require light to grow and develop. This is why the plant that received 24 hours of light grew taller. Teacher Comments: This example provides a simple claim that focuses on one variable that plants need to grow— light. The example provides evidence to support the claim from an experiment that focused solely on comparing plants that received 24 hours of light with those that received 12 hours. The actual data is not complex; rather, it is limited to support the sense-making process and in writing the scientific explanations. The reasoning is also fairly simple, but it is a good start at thinking about why data counts as evidence to support the claim. Example 2 The Question: What do plants need to grow? Our Claim: The plant that received more light grew more. Our Evidence: Our Justification of the Evidence: On average, for the six plants that received 24 hours of light, they grew 20 cm, had six yellow flowers, had fifteen leaves, and they were all bright green. On average, for the six plants that received 12 hours of light, they grew 8 cm, had two yellow flowers, and had four leaves. Also, two of the plants had zero flowers. These plants were still bright green, but they were smaller and with fewer flowers and leaves Plants require light to grow and develop. This is why the plant that received 24 hours of light grew more. Teacher Comments: The claim is still limited to focus on light, but the scientific explanation example now includes multiple pieces of evidence. Furthermore, the evidence includes both quantitative measurements (e.g., average height, number of flowers, and number of leaves) and qualitative observations (e.g., color of flowers and leaves). Obviously, the data collected in this case was more complicated and required greater analysis before the group could construct their initial claim. Example 3 The Question: What do plants need to grow? Our Claim: Plants need water, carbon dioxide, and light to grow. Our Evidence: Our Justification of the Evidence: On average, for the six plants that received constant light, carbon dioxide, and water, they grew 20 cm, had six yellow flowers, had fifteen leaves, and they were all bright green. On average, for the six plants that received 12 hours of light, limited carbon dioxide and water, they grew 8 cm, had two yellow flowers, and had four leaves. Also, two of the plants had zero flowers. These plants were still bright green, but they were smaller and with fewer flowers and leaves. Photosynthesis is the process during which green plants produce sugar from water, carbon dioxide, and light energy. Producing sugar is essential for plant growth and development. That is why the plants that received a constant source of water, carbon dioxide, and light grew the most. Teacher Comments: This example becomes more complex in that the group has decided to investigate multiple variables that impact plant growth. This question requires a greater understanding of the science concepts related to plant growth and that water, carbon dioxide, and light are necessary for photosynthesis to occur. Not only does the reasoning become more complicated, but the claim that the group is justifying has also become more complex. Like Example 2, this group uses specific quantitative and qualitative evidence in order to support the claim. Your Name: Course: ____________________________________________________ Teacher: ___________________________________________________ Question: Claim: Evidence: Justification (Reasoning) of the Evidence:
Element Question and Claim Evidence Exemplary Accomplished Developing Beginning 25-21 pts 20-16 pts 15-11 pts 10-0 pts Scientific question is clearly written. The claim demonstrates a deep understanding of the science topic Scientific question is written clearly. The claim demonstrates an understanding of the science topic The scientific question is unclear or missing. The claim is inaccurate, incomplete or implausible No question or claim is provided, OR scientific question is incorrect. Written summary of evidence used to support the claim is accurate, sufficient, and appropriate. Written summary of evidence used to support the claim is mostly accurate, sufficient, and appropriate. Some written evidence used to support the claim is accurate, sufficient, and appropriate. No written summary of evidence is provided, or evidence is completely inaccurate. Somewhat relates evidence to a scientific principle in order to support the claim; reasoning is mostly logical, complete, and accurate. Provides reasoning, but No reasoning is the reasoning provided given. may be illogical, incomplete, or inaccurate. Thoroughly relates evidence to a scientific Justification principle(s) in order to / Scientific support the claim; Reasoning reasoning is logical, complete, and accurate. Writing Quality and Organizatio n • Writing uses clear, concise, and expressive language. • Writing accurately includes scientific terms and vocabulary. • All required sections are labeled and easily identified • 3+ sources cited properly (MLA or APA style) • • • • Writing uses clear and understandable language. Writing includes scientific terms and vocabulary. Most required sections are labeled and easily identified 3 sources cited properly (MLA or APA style) • Writing uses mostly clear and understandable language. • Writing uses conventional terminology and vocabulary. • Most sections are present but not easily identified • 1-2 sources cited properly or 3 sources not cited properly (MLA or APA style) • Writing does not use clear and understandable language. • Writing does not use conventional terminology and vocabulary. • No apparent sections present • No sources present Radioactivity Argument Rubric - Physics Yellow highlights indicate where you fall on the rubric (the lowest category is taken for your score) Red text = my feedback **You may resubmit work after revising to show improved mastery. FVS considers mastery a 70% or higher. Please submit directly to my email address Score =

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Thomas574
School: New York University

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Anonymous
Thanks, good work

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