Oxidation and Reduction

Chemistry
Tutor: None Selected Time limit: 1 Day

Is Francium (Fr) likely to be reduced in a chemical reaction? Would it be easy or difficult to separate Francium from ores? Explain your reasoning.

Jul 10th, 2015

Thank you for the opportunity to help you with your question!

As i would be say that G1 metals are reducing agents so very likely, so i already said it is not likely to be reduced because it is on the far left side of the table. Actually Francium would be oxidized, losing its outer electron. Francium is a group 11 alkali earth metal. As such it will have two electrons in its outer shell. It will lose these rewadily and be oxidised. It is therefore not a good candidate for reduction. 

Francium is an artificial element made in the laboratory by the alpha disintegration of actinium. It can also be made artificially by bombarding thorium with protons. While it occurs naturally in uranium minerals, there is probably less than an ounce of francium at any time in the total crust of the earth. There is therefore no question about ease of separation from its ores - there aren't any. Finally it based on the electronegativity of Francium (.7) I would think that it would get reduced in a chemical reaction. By Using  this acronym: LEO says GER. Lose Electrons Oxidized, Gain Electrons Reduced. 

As for separating Francium from ores, I would think it would be relatively easy. Most ores consist of metals, or have metallic properties. Almost all metals exhibit metallic covalent bonding, where two or more atoms of a metal share electrons - which is a very weak bond, until a highly electronegative atom comes to take the electrons. So as for separating Francium from ores, I would think it'd be easy, so to speak. 

Francium was actually isolated from uranium ore by Marguerite Percy at the Institute Curie in Paris in 1939. The difficulty in separating francium from ores lies in the fact that at any one time, there is about one ounce of francium in the entire earth's crust. It arises as a result of radioactive decay of uranium and thorium deposits.Only problem with separating Francium from ores is finding enough of the metal in the first place, there's next to none that exists on the Earth. If there is any, it's extremely difficult to reach - I believe because it's deep down in the Earth's crust.


Please let me know if you need any clarification. I'm always happy to answer your questions.
Jul 10th, 2015

Thanks a bunch! This really clarified my doubts! ^.^

Jul 10th, 2015

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