Inventing the Appalachian other summary

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Step One—Summary: When we summarize material, we condense a text to the author’s thesis and main arguments. Each of the five reading responses should begin by providing a summary of the assigned segment. For example, first reading response should provide a summary of pages 7-35. Summarizing so much material can be a challenge and requires closely reading the selection. Write your summaries for a hypothetical audience who has not read Catte’s book. Begin your summary with a topic sentence and include textual examples and details. Summaries generally do not include long direct quotes.Use your own words to trim Catte’s arguments to their most important points.

Step Two—Analysis: In the second section of your response, identify and isolate rhetorical element Catte uses in the assigned section of the book (see the schedule below for which element to analyze in each response). To successfully compose this section, follow these steps:

Step One: Read the assigned pages carefully and closely with the assigned rhetorical element in mind (ex. if you know you will be asked to discuss Catte’s use of appeals in this response, look out for ethos, logos, and pathos as you read. Take notes as you go).

Step One—Summary: When we summarize material, we condense a text to the author’s thesis and main arguments. Each of the five reading responses should begin by providing a summary of the assigned segment. For example, first reading response should provide a summary of pages 735. Summarizing so much material can be a challenge and requires closely reading the selection. Write your summaries for a hypothetical audience who has not read Catte’s book. Begin your summary with a topic sentence and include textual examples and details. Summaries generally do not include long direct quotes.Use your own words to trim Catte’s arguments to their most important points. Step Two—Analysis: In the second section of your response, identify and isolate rhetorical element Catte uses in the assigned section of the book (see the schedule below for which element to analyze in each response). To successfully compose this section, follow these steps: Step One: Read the assigned pages carefully and closely with the assigned rhetorical element in mind (ex. if you know you will be asked to discuss Catte’s use of appeals in this response, look out for ethos, logos, and pathos as you read. Take notes as you go). Step Two:Write a topic sentence for your analysis section that identifies the rhetorical element you will analyze and previews your claim(s) about its effectiveness. Step Three: Analyze Catte’s use of this rhetorical element. Consider the following questions when brainstorming for the analytical section: What is the rhetorical effect of this element within the context of the larger argument? What is Catte’s intended effect? How does Catte’s use of this element increase or decrease the overall persuasiveness of the book? Remember to use textual evidence to support your claims. Schedule of rhetorical elements explored in each analytical paragraph: 1.audience 2.context 3.appeals (ethos, pathos, logos) 4.structure 5.style and tone Step Three—Source Integration: For the third section, select a passage (no longer than 3 sentences) from the assigned selection that you think is particularly significant to Catte’s argument. Open your section by introducing and contextualizing the passage. Then, directly quote and cite the passage. Finally, in 3+ sentences, interpret and analyze the quote and explain its significance to the larger work. . Follow MLA guidelines (double space; 12 point Times New Roman font; header [last name and page number]; heading [your name, my name, class, date submitted]; 1 inch margins; title [ex. Reading Response: Submission One]). What does an “A” reading response look like? The following points can be distilled to this: to get an A, every aspect of the summary, analysis, and source integration must be written for an audience who has not read Catte’s book. This means the writing is clear, cohesive, accurate, and well supported with textual evidence. Remember: the purpose of reading responses is to hone the skills you will need write your research paper, which requires you to summarize, integrate, evaluate, and synthesizes multiple research sources. • • • • • • • Summary Section: An “A” Summary: Begins with a topic sentence (mini-thesis statement) that introduces the main theme(s) of the chapters; Presents summary material in a logical, clear order (note: this does not always mean presenting main points in the same order as they appear in Catte’s book); Correctly identifies Catte’s main points from each assigned section (i.e., focuses on the important stuff); Makes specific, rather than vague, claims; o ex. of a vague claim: a sentence like “Catte’s book discusses stereotypes of people from Appalachia” is technically accurate; however, it doesn’t contain enough specifics about Catte’s argument for your reader to understand the significance, and purpose, of her book. Uses transition words, phrases, and sentences to show the connections between Catte’s main ideas. In other words, the summary is presented as a cohesive unit rather than as a list of vaguely related points; Accurately represents the section’s content; Ends with a sentence that concludes—or wraps up—the summary section and states the main takeaway(s). Analysis Section: An “A” Analysis: • • • • Begins with a topic sentence (mini-thesis statement) that states your overall claim about the effectiveness of Catte’s use of the assigned rhetorical strategy; Correctly identifies instances of the assigned rhetorical strategy; Supports all claims with specific textual evidence; o ex. a sentence like “Catte appeals to logos frequently throughout these pages” represents ½ of a complete rhetorical analysis. The other ½, which is the more important part, points to specific examples of Catte’s use of logos. Similarly, a claim such as “Catte uses statistics to appeal to the reader’s sense of logic” should be followed with a “such as” and an example or two. Ends with a sentence that concludes—or wraps up—the analytical section and states the main takeaway. Source Integration Section: An “A” Source Integration Section: • • • • Begins with a topic sentence that contextualizes the selected passage and previews its significance: Properly quotes the passage following MLA guidelines—acknowledgment phrase, quotation marks, parenthetical citation with page number(s). (note: quoted passage should not exceed three sentences); Paraphrases and Interprets the passage in student’s own words; Explains the significance of the passage to Catte’s overall thesis and/or to the point she is making in a particular section (i.e., why is this passage important enough to directly quote?).

Tutor Answer

peachblack
School: Cornell University

Please have alook at the below copy and let me know if you need any clarifications or editing. Thank you.

Outline

Introduction
Body
Conclusion
References


Surname 1
Name
Course
Instructor’s name
Date
Step one: Summary
The text is an explanation of how the Appalachians came to be known as “The other”.
The narrative starts with an explanation of the historical background of this community covering
the periods between the Civil war and the Great Depression. Catte explains that after the Civil
war, there was an interaction between the migrating indigenous people and the European settlers
which shaped the identity of the Appalachians (Catte, 36). This period was followed by the
period of industrial revolution which mostly benefitted the outsiders hence making them
dominant over the indigenous people. She further explains that the "otherness" was influenced by
the feeling that the Appalachians complicated the American national progress. Appalachia was
considered a strange place whose primary purpose was to aid in industrialisation. The
Murderland narrative explains the source of conflict between families in...

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Anonymous
Top quality work from this guy! I'll be back!

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