Who Abused Jane Doe summary

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Include a summary of specific information learned and how it relates to the week's chapter material.

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CHAPTER 1 Module 1.1 Foundations of Modern Psychology Ivica Drusany/Shutterstock.com CSL, CartoonStock Ltd Contemporary Perspectives in Psychology © vadim kozlovsky/Shutterstock.com Contemporary Perspectives in Psychology CHAPTER 1 Module 1.1 Foundations of Modern Psychology Contemporary Perspectives in Psychology Contemporary Perspectives in Psychology: How They Differ Questions About Specific Topics Perspective General Questions Aggression Depression Obesity How do early learning experiences shape our behavior as adults? How is aggressive behavior learned? How is it rewarded or reinforced? Does exposure to violence in the media or among one’s peers play a role? How is depression related to changes in reinforcement patterns? What social skills are needed to establish and maintain social relationships that could serve as sources of reinforcement? How might unhealthy eating habits lead to obesity? How might we change those habits? How do unresolved conflicts from childhood affect adult behavior? How can people be helped to cope with these conflicts? How is aggression related to unconscious impulses? Against whom are these impulses really directed? How might depression be related to unresolved loss? Might it represent anger turned inward? Might obesity relate to childhood conflicts revolving around unresolved needs for love and support? Might food have become a substitute for love? Behavioral Psychoanalytic CHAPTER 1 Module 1.1 Foundations of Modern Psychology Contemporary Perspectives in Psychology Contemporary Perspectives in Psychology: How They Differ Questions About Specific Topics Perspective General Questions Aggression Depression Obesity How to people pursue goals that give their lives a sense of meaning and purpose? Might violence be related to frustration arising when people are blocked from pursuing their goals? How might we turn this around to prevent violence? Might depression be related to a lack of self-esteem or a threat to one’s self image? Might it stem from a sense of purposelessness or lack of meaning in life? What sets the stage for obesity? Does food have a special meaning for obese people? How can we help them find other sources of satisfaction? How do biological structures and processes make behavior possible? What roles to nature (heredity) and nurture (environment) play in such areas as intelligence, language development, and aggression? What brain mechanisms control aggressive behavior? Might brain abnormalities explain violent behavior in some people? How are changes in brain chemistry related to depression? What genetic links might there be? Is obesity inherited? What genes may be involved? How would knowledge of a genetic basis lead to new approaches to treatment or prevention? Humanistic Physiological CHAPTER 1 Module 1.1 Foundations of Modern Psychology Contemporary Perspectives in Psychology Contemporary Perspectives in Psychology: How They Differ Questions About Specific Topics Perspective General Questions Aggression Depression Obesity How do people solve problems, make decisions, and develop language? What thoughts trigger aggressive responses? What beliefs do aggressive people hold that might increase their potential for violence? What type of thinking patterns are related to depression? How might they be changed to help people overcome depression or prevent it from occurring? How does obesity affect a person’s self-concept? What thoughts lead to eating binges? How might they be changed? How do concepts of self differ across cultures? How do social and cultural influences shape behavior? What social conditions give rise to drug use and aggressive behavior? Does our society condone or even reward certain forms of violence, such as sexual aggression against women or spousal abuse? Is depression linked to social stresses, such as poverty or unemployment? Why is depression more common among certain groups of people, especially women? Does it have to do with their expected social roles? Are some groups at greater risk of obesity than others? Do cultural differences in dietary patterns and customs play a role? Cognitive Sociocultural CHAPTER 1 Module 1.1 Foundations of Modern Psychology Research in Psychology Psychologists’ Areas of Specialization Where Psychologists Work Clinical psychologists make up the largest group of psychologists, followed by counseling psychologists and industrial/organizational psychologists. The largest group of psychologists works in settings that provide psychological services. Many work at colleges and universities as teachers, researchers, administrators, or supervisors of psychologists in training. Some also work in schools or government agencies. Source: American Psychological Association, 2004. Source: American Psychological Association, 2003. CHAPTER 1 Module 1.2 Psychologists: Who They Are and What They Do Specialty Areas of Psychology Specialty Areas of Psychology Nature of Specialty Typical Questions Studied Experimental psychologists Conduct research on learning, cognition, sensation and perception, biological bases of behavior, and animal behavior How do various states of arousal affect learning? What brain centers are responsible for memory? Clinical psychologists Evaluate and treats people with psychological problem and disorders, such as depressions and schizophrenia How can we diagnose anxiety? Is depression treated more effectively with psychotherapy or drug therapy? Help people with adjustment problems What kind of occupation would this student find fulfilling? Why does this person find it difficult to make friends? Counseling psychologists CHAPTER 1 Module 1.2 Psychologists: Who They Are and What They Do © Richard T. Nowitz/Science Source Types of Psychologists What are the different specialty areas in psychology? What types of questions do the different types of psychologists study? Specialty Areas of Psychology Specialty Areas of Psychology Types of Psychologists Nature of Specialty Typical Questions Studied School psychologists Work in school systems to help children with academic problems or special needs Would this child profit from special education, or would he or she be better off in a regular classroom? Educational psychologists Construct standardized psychological and educational tests (such as the SAT); improve course planning and instructional methods Is this test a valid predictor of success in college? How can we teach algebra more efficiently? Developmental psychologists Study physical, cognitive, social, and personality development across the life span At what age to children begin to walk or speak? What types of crises do people face in middle or later adulthood? Personality psychologists Study the psychological characteristics that make each of us unique What is the structure of personality? How do we measure personality? Social psychologists Study the nature and causes of people’s thoughts, feelings, and behavior in social situations What are the origins of prejudice? Why do people do things as members of a groups that they would not do as individuals? CHAPTER 1 Module 1.2 Psychologists: Who They Are and What They Do Specialty Areas of Psychology Specialty Areas of Psychology Types of Psychologists Nature of Specialty Typical Questions Studied Environmental psychologists Study the ways in which people’s behavior and mental processes influence, and are influenced by, their physical environments What are the effects of city life on people? How does overcrowding affect people’s health and behavior? Industrial/organizational psychologists Study the relationships between people and their work environments How can we find out who would perform will in this position? How can we make hiring and promotion fairer? How can we enhance employees’ motivation? Health psychologists Study the relationships between psychological factors and the prevention and treatment of physical illness How can we help people avoid risky sexual behaviors? How can we help people quit smoking and start to exercise? Consumer psychologists Study relationships between psychological factors and consumers’ preferences and purchasing behavior Why do people select particular brands? What types of people prefer a particular type of product? CHAPTER 1 Module 1.2 Psychologists: Who They Are and What They Do Jamie Sabau/Getty Images Specialty Areas of Psychology CHAPTER 1 Module 1.2 Psychologists: Who They Are and What They Do Professional Psychology: Becoming More Diverse CHAPTER 1 Module 1.2 Psychologists: Who They Are and What They Do Kenneth Clark AP Images © Archives of the History of American Psychology-The University of Akron Margaret Floy Washburn © Wellesley College Archives/photo by Pastridge Mary Whiton Calkins Professional Psychology: Becoming More Diverse Ethnicities of Doctorate Recipients in Psychology Women PhD Recipients in Psychology Note: Numbers do not sum up to 100% because of rounding. Source: Lin, Stamm, & Christidis, 2015 CHAPTER 1 Source: Christidis, P., Samm, K., & Lin, L. (2016 May). Latest class of psychologist is more diverse. Monitor on Psychology, 47(5), p. 24. Module 1.2 Psychologists: Who They Are and What They Do The Scientific Method: How We Know What We Know Common Misconceptions About Psychology Myth Fact Psychologists can read people’s minds. No, psychologists cannot read peoples’ minds. As one prominent psychologist put it, “If you want to know what people are thinking, ask them. They might just tell you.” Psychology is not a true science. Psychology is indeed a true science because it is grounded in he scientific method. There can only be one true psychological theory; all others must be false. No one theory accounts for all forms of behavior. Theories are more or less useful to the degree, they account for the available evidence and lead to accurate predictions of future behavior. Some theories account for some types of behavior better than others, but many have value in accounting for some forms of behavior. The full moon drives peoples to lunacy. Although the word lunacy derives from the Latin word for moon, luna, evidence fails to back up the widely held belief that the full moon is associated with bizarre behaviors, suicides, crimes, or increased hospital admissions (Belleville et al., 2012; Lilienfeld & Arkowitz, 2009). CHAPTER 1 Module 1.3 Research Methods in Psychology The Scientific Method: How We Know What We Know General Steps in the Scientific Method 1 2 Developing a Research Question Drawing on theory, observations, experiences, or common beliefs to formulate a researchable question CHAPTER 1 3 Forming a Hypothesis Reframing the question so that it becomes a specific prediction that can be tested through research Module 1.3 Research Methods in Psychology 4 Gathering Evidence Testing the hypothesis Drawing Conclusions Using statistical methods of analysis to determine whether the data support the hypothesis Descriptive Research Methods The Case Study Method An in-depth investigation of a very rare or unusual occurrence within the field. It can lead to a tremendous amount of information about that case, but the information may be somewhat biased or inaccurate. There is also a lack of the rigorous control that is found in other approaches. CHAPTER 1 The Survey Method Utilizes questionnaires or interviews to gather information about groups of people. Allows researchers to draw conclusions about populations by examining subsets, called samples. Random sampling is used to make sure that the sample is representative of the larger population. Findings might be compromised by inaccurate responding, or the social desirability bias (the desire to look good by altering one's answers away from truthful responding). Module 1.3 Research Methods in Psychology Naturalistic Observation Observing behaviors as they occur in natural, settings or habitats. Provides a more accurate picture of natural behaviors because there is no direct influence to the settings in which these behaviors occur. Problems include a lack of control over research settings, as well as the issue of bias in those who are doing the observations. The Correlational Method Positive Correlation Generally speaking, people with higher levels of education tend to earn higher incomes. CHAPTER 1 Module 1.3 Research Methods in Psychology Negative Correlation Generally speaking, the longer a person is deprived of sleep, the less alert the person is likely to be. © Denis Larkin/Shutterstock.com The Experimental Method CHAPTER 1 Module 1.3 Research Methods in Psychology Summarizing the Different Research Approaches How Psychologists Do Research Comments Approaches to Research Questions on Love In the case study method, researchers interview or observe an individual (or small group of individuals) or examine historical records of the lives of particular individuals. The accuracy of case studies may be jeopardized by gaps or errors in people’s memories or by their efforts to make a favorable impression on a researcher. A psychologist interested in the reasons people choose their mates might conduct in-depth interviews with several married people. In the survey method, researchers use questionnaires or interviews to obtain information about a particular group of people. Psychologists may use surveys to explore the attitudes of thousands of peoples about such topics as abortion, premarital sex, or leisure pursuits. Results of surveys may be compromised by volunteer bias and other problems. Psychologists might survey thousands of individuals about the characteristics of the people they have chosen as mates. In the naturalistic observation method, researchers observe behavior in the field–that is, where it occurs naturally. Psychologists attempt not to interfere with behaviors they are observing. They may spend considerable time allowing there research participants to become accustomed to them before they begin their observations. Psychologists might observe from a distance how lovers walk together and how the look at each other. CHAPTER 1 Module 1.3 Research Methods in Psychology © AISPIX/Shutterstock.com What Researchers Do How do psychologists study love? Let us count the ways. Summarizing the Different Research Approaches How Psychologists Do Research What Researchers Do Comments Approaches to Research Questions on Love In the correlational method, researchers use statistical methods to reveal and describe positive and negative relationships (correlations) between variables. This method may suggest the presence of cause and effect, but it does not demonstrate it. The degree to which variables are statistically associated is expressed as a correlation coefficient, which varies from –1.00 to +1.00. Psychologists might study relationships between feelings of love, self-esteem, and sexual satisfaction. In the experimental method, psychologists manipulate one or more independent variables (make changes in the participants’ environments) and observe their effects on one or more dependent (measured) variables. Experiments are conducted to establish cause-and-effect relationships between independent and dependent variables. Participants in experimental groups receive an experimental treatment; those in control groups do not. All other conditions are held constant to ensure that the independent variable alone is the cause of the observed effects. Random assignment to groups helps ensure that groups do not differ in characteristics that might affect the outcome. Psychologists might expose dating partners to an experimental treatment in which they share an arousing experience, such as watching an emotionally powerful movie, and then measure the treatment’s effects on the partners’ feelings towards each other. (The control group would be exposed to a neutral movie). CHAPTER 1 Module 1.3 Research Methods in Psychology © cubephoto/Shutterstock.com Ethical Principles in Psychological Research CHAPTER 1 Module 1.3 Research Methods in Psychology

Tutor Answer

Juniper
School: UT Austin

Hello buddy, kindly find your paper attached below. Let me know what you think. Thank you

Running Head: WHO ABUSED JANE DOE

1

Who Abused Jane Doe
Name
Institution

WHO ABUSED JANE DOE

2

Summary of the article
In the article, Who abused Jane Doe, Corwin was investigating claims of sexual and
physical abuse on Jane by her biological mother as instituted by Jane’s father and her step
mother. The psychologist videotaped Jane when she was a child three times and used the
information as the main basis of evaluating the abuse claims (Loftus & Guyer, 2002). In the
video tapes, Jane stated how her step mother abused her repeatedly. She narrated how her step
mother could sexually abuse her in the bathroom using digital penetration. Furthermore, she
reported how she was abused physically such as being hit, her hai...

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Anonymous
awesome work thanks

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