CORE260 Christian Ethics King's Critical Report

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Question Description

I need help with critical reports for my Christian Ethics course

there are 6 critical report questions that requires reading and understanding the material

I've attached the instructions and a copy of the reading pages from two books for this course

answer each critical report separetly

pleas look at the attachment

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REQUIRED TEXTS • Stiltner, Brian. Toward Thriving Communities: Virtue Ethics As Social Ethics. 2016. • Marino, Gordon Daniel. Ethics: The Essential Writings. New York: Modern Library, 2010. • Other PDF’s will be posted on Moodle. 1/17 – Unit I: Virtue, Community, and the Good Life Topic: The nature of ethics and the good life Reading and Discussion: Ethics: The Essential Writings, Plato, 6–42. Due: Critical Report 1 Writing prompt: Is what is good inherently good independent of God, or is the good only good because God declares it to be so? 1/22 – Unit I: Virtue, Community, and the Good Life Topic: Paths toward the good life Reading and Discussion: Toward Thriving Communities, 19–42. Due: Critical Report 2 Writing prompt: Which approach to ethics is most appealing to you at this moment? Why? What is a strength and a weakness of the approach? 1/24 – Unit I: Virtue, Community, and the Good Life Topic: Deontology, utilitarianism, and the good life Reading and Discussion: Ethics: The Essential Writings, Kant, 203–224; John Stuart Mill, 228– 232. Due: Critical Report 3 Writing prompt: Are Kant’s categorical imperatives sufficient for determining what is ethical? 1/29 – Unit I: Virtue, Community, and the Good Life Topic: Virtue and the good life Reading and Discussion: Toward Thriving Communities, 45–69. Due: Critical Report 4 Writing prompt: Which virtue(s) are a strength in your own life/practice and which do you struggle with? 1/31 – Unit I: Virtue, Community, and the Good Life Topic: Aristotle and Aquinas on justice and the good life Reading and Discussion: Ethics: The Essential Writings, Aristotle, 66–84; Aquinas 122–133. Due: Critical Report 5 Writing prompt: How could you follow Aristotle and apply his philosophy to build some habits to develop your moral life? Reading and Discussion: Toward Thriving Communities, 72–100. Due: Critical Report 6 Writing prompt: Is human flourishing something you have the freedom to control and actualize? Or is flourishing beyond individual control? Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner ...
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henryprofessor
School: Carnegie Mellon University

Attached.

Surname 1
Name
Professor
Course
Date
God and Morality
In his conversation with Euthyphro, Socrates attempts to define piety based on the gods’
view of humanity. While Euthyphro suggests that piety is equal to something that is loved by the
gods, Socrates finds a problem in that the gods may disagree on the person to love. The major
dilemma, therefore, is whether something good has to be that which is loved by the gods or it
could be good independent of the gods. The setting of Socrates and Euthyphro is in the case
whereby the gods are the Greek gods, but this is quite different from today’s setting in
monotheistic religions such as Christianity. Socrates suggests that moral authority has to be good
but not necessarily from the gods. For instance, he explains to Euthyphro that “justice is the more
extended notion of which piety is only a part” (Marino, p. 18). Piety is the view of morality from
God. Overall, this discussion is quite controversial because of the nature of the Greek gods and
the fact that they could disagree on some issues. However, in Christianity where there is only one
God, disagreement is impossible. Therefore, one could suggest that something is good because
God declares it to be so. The difference between Christianity and Socrates’ ethics is that under
Christianity, God is the moral standard and as humans, we are too limited to judge him or place
him on our moral compasses. Therefore, I would argue that one who is a Christian must take
every command given by God to be good. As an all-knowing being, God knows all good and
hence is the basic standard for human beings. This standard is, of course, different from
Socrates’ argument based on the Christian belief as contrasted with Greek gods and religiosity.

Surname 2
Work Cited
Marino, Gordon (Ed.). Ethics: The Essential Writings. New York, NY: Modern Library, 2010.


Surname 1
Name
Professor
Course
Date
Deontology
Ethical approaches guide the actions of human beings based on a certain theory of
morality and ethics. Currently, I identify with the deontological approach to ethics because I
believe it is the most rational and fair in activities. This approach was developed by Immanuel
Kant and was based on rational respect for people and ethical duty of a person as they act
(Stiltner, p. 26). Two basic ...

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Anonymous
Thanks, good work

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