ENG 111 IU Your First Draft

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timer Asked: Feb 3rd, 2019
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Question Description

Core Reading: https://www.thenation.com/article/the-government-s...

Other core Reading:https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2017/01/struggli...

Your Purpose Statement

  • Minimum 150 words (successful statements are often longer)
  • Following Step 2 in CHAPTER 3, analyze and specifically describe your Audience, Time, Place, and Purpose of your draft and answer the “Examine the Relevance” questions in Step 2 of CHAPTER 7 ("Comparing and Synthesizing") or CHAPTER 8 ("Conducting Rhetorical Analysis").
  • NOTE: Your audience consists of other members of this class and your instructor
  • Place your purpose statement at the beginning of your first draft, before the first page of your actual composition

Your First Draft (if your instructor assigned the Rhetorical Analysis). Be sure to check in Module 6 which analysis assignment your instructor requires.

  • A Rhetorical Analysis of the core reading you wrote about for Writing Project 1
  • Clear identification, early in the draft, of the core reading by full author name and full article title (following MLA or APA style for formatting titles) and brief overview of its content (This is usually part of the introduction.)
  • Clearly developed thesis statement making a claim about the purpose or effectiveness of rhetorical features of the core reading
  • Well-reasoned analysis of the core reading’s rhetorical strategies, supported with evidence
  • Use of at least one additional source found using the Ivy Tech Virtual Library databases.
  • Use of at least 10 quotes and/or paraphrases of the core reading and/or your outside source, cited using correct in-text citations
  • APA or MLA manuscript style, as specified by your instructor, with in-text citations and a References or Works Cited list including ALL sources used. (References or Works Cited list does not count in the minimum word-count requirement)
  • Observation of the conventions of Standard English
  • 750 words minimum for first draft (the minimum 150 words for your purpose statement is not included in this count)

Your First Draft (if your instructor assigned the Comparative Analysis). Be sure to check in Module 6 which analysis assignment your instructor requires.

  • A comparative analysis of two of the core readings, including the one you wrote about for Writing Project 1
  • Clear identification, early in the draft, of the core readings by full author name and full article title (following MLA or APA style for formatting titles) and brief overview of each article’s content (This is usually part of the introduction.)
  • Clearly developed thesis statement making a central claim about the similarities and differences between the two core readings
  • Well-reasoned analysis based on relevant and complex comparisons, supported with evidence from the core readings
  • Use of at least one additional source found using the Ivy Tech Virtual Library databases
  • Use of at least 10 quotes and/or paraphrases of the core readings and/or your outside source, cited using correct in-text citations
  • APA or MLA manuscript style, as specified by your instructor, with in-text citations and a Works Cited or References list including ALL sources used. (Works Cited or References list does not count in the minimum word-count requirement)
  • Observation of the conventions of Standard English
  • 750 words minimum for first draft (the minimum 150 words for your purpose statement is not included in this count)

CriteriaRatingsg;s

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomePurpose StatementEffective purpose statement, minimum 150 words

5.0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeComplete DraftComplete draft with introduction including clear thesis statement, body, and conclusion—minimum 750 words

10.0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeUse of at least 10 quotes or paraphrases in correct MLA or APA styleCorrect APA or MLA formatting, as specified by instructor, including correct APA References page or MLA Works Cited page; use of at least 10 quotes or paraphrases, cited using correct APA or MLA in-text citations

5.0 pts

Total Points: 20.0

WRITING PROJECT 2: Analysis — Rhetorical Analysis Description & Steps Consult CHAPTER 8 of Writing: Ten Core Concepts to develop and complete your project. (You may also need to consult CHAPTER 3, as directed by the steps in CHAPTER 8.) Below are specific details related to this project to consider as you progress through each core writing concept. For this project, you will return to the CORE READING you wrote about in Writing Project 1 and write a rhetorical analysis of that core reading. This time you will analyze its rhetorical features—paying attention to its rhetorical situation, its use of persuasive appeals or proofs, as well as linguistic and rhetorical elements such as language, writing style, structure or organization, imagery, etc.—in order to address and answer “three main questions” about the core reading: 1 Explore the Topic • “What are the main [rhetorical] features” of the core reading? • “How do those features affect the intended audience” for the core reading? • “Why did the writer include those features” and write the core reading in the ways he or she did? (Yagelski 212) Step 1 of CHAPTER 8 will guide you as develop questions about the rhetorical features of your core reading. Besides CHAPTER 8, you should also consult learning materials in Module 6 and Modules 3 and 4 Discussion on Critical Rereading to deepen your thinking and prepare for your first draft. 2 Examine rhetorical context For this project, your audience will consist of your instructor and other members of the class. To develop a rhetorical context for this project, you will write a purpose statement. Use Step 2 in CHAPTER 3 as well as the “Examine the Relevance” questions in Step 2 of CHAPTER 8, to specifically describe your Audience, Time, Place, and Purpose. What you write for Step 2 will be your purpose statement, which you will submit as part of your first draft, due in Module 6. See Assignment Specifics, below, for information on writing your purpose statement. Your medium for this project will be a formal academic manuscript and must meet the guidelines listed below. Instruction on these guidelines can be found in CHAPTERS 24 or 25 of our textbook and Writing Project 2: Analysis in Module 6: 3 Select a medium 4 Have something to say • Minimum 750 words for the first draft; minimum 1000 words for the final draft; both drafts double-spaced in 12point Times New Roman font. • Formatted according to either APA or MLA style (as specified by your instructor). • Use of correct in-text citations of any ideas or information borrowed from source, including the core reading. • A formal list of all sources (a References list for APA or a Works Cited list for MLA) used, including the core reading you selected, following APA or MLA style guidelines. Step 4 of CHAPTER 8 will guide you as you develop a central claim or thesis statement for your rhetorical analysis as well as help you select an analytical framework for your draft. The framework will help you analyze your CORE READING and support your thesis statement. Keep in mind that your thesis statement may incorporate more than one framework. In this step, you will begin to write a first draft for this project, due in Module 6. This draft isn’t complete, though, until you’ve applied ideas you developed in Step 6. To back up what you say, you will analyze your CORE READING using the framework(s) you chose in Step 4. You will also use quotations and paraphrases from the core reading you selected to support your claims about the text’s rhetorical features. In addition, you will find and use one outside source that you discover through the Ivy Tech Virtual Library databases, applying the knowledge you learned in the IvyTilt Modules in Module 5 to find one additional relevant source. This source might be… 5 Back up what you say 6 Establish form and structure 7 Get feedback 8 Revise • • • • • an article about the author of the core reading; an article about the core reading itself; an article that provides information relevant to the core readings’s content and/or rhetorical situation; another text by the same author that uses similar or different rhetorical strategies; or an article about the same subject as the core reading that may use different or similar rhetorical techniques to deal with the subject. This additional outside source does not need to be the major focus of your discussion. Instead, use it to shed light on or supplement one or more of your points about the author and his/her rhetorical strategies. Use at least 10 quotations and/or paraphrases from the core reading and/or your additional source. ALL quotations and paraphrases, no matter how many you use, and ALL sources used, must be correctly cited following APA or MLA style guidelines (as specified by your instructor). Follow this step to develop your organizational strategy for your composition. TURN IT IN: After you have applied your organizational strategy to your first draft, you’re ready to submit your purpose statement and first draft in Module 6. See Assessment Specifics, below, for information on completing and turning in the first draft and your purpose statement. Students will conduct peer response in Module 7, where you will find instructions on how to conduct peer response. After you receive feedback from your peers in class, you will need to review this feedback and develop a strategy for how to apply that feedback to a revision of your first draft. Follow this step to revise your first draft. Keep in mind that your revision of the first draft should incorporate peer response feedback you received from your peers as well as guidance offered in Step 8 of CHAPTER 8. Along with your final draft, you will submit a cover letter, describing and explaining the feedback you received from your peers and how you revised your first draft based on that feedback and on Step 8. See Assignment Specifics, below, for information on writing the cover letter. 9 10 Strengthen your voice In this step, you will think about and make changes to your draft based on language choices: developing your voice, tone, and writing style in the draft. CHAPTER 26 of Writing: Ten Core Concepts offers a number of stylistic considerations. These kinds of changes may also be discussed in your cover letter. Make it correct In this step, you will look for errors in grammar, punctuation, and spelling and correct them. CHAPTER 27 of Writing: Ten Core Concepts offers guidance on the kinds of errors to find and correct. You will also look to confirm that you correctly cited your sources and correctly formatted your draft according to APA or MLA style and make any necessary corrections. Do NOT discuss these kinds of changes in your cover letter. TURN IT IN: After you applied this step, you’re ready to submit your cover letter and final draft in Module 8. See Assessment Specifics, below, for information on completing and turning in the final draft and cover letter. WRITING PROJECT 2: Analysis—Rhetorical Analysis Assessment Specifics & Grading Rubrics The following provides specific information for completing and submitting your project assignments – your purpose statement and first draft, due in Module 6, and the cover letter and final draft, due in Module 8. FIRST DRAFT - Due in Module 6 (20 points) 1. 2. Your Purpose Statement Specifics First Draft Specifics • Minimum 150 words (successful analyses are often longer) • Following Step 2 in CHAPTER 3, analyze and specifically describe your Audience, Time, Place, and Purpose of your draft and answer the “Examine the Relevance” questions in Step 2 of CHAPTER 8. • NOTE: Your audience consists of other members of this class and your instructor • Place your purpose statement at the beginning of your first draft, before the first page of your actual composition • A Rhetorical Analysis of the core reading you wrote about for Writing Project 1 • Clear identification, early in the draft, of the core reading by full author name and full article title (following MLA or APA style for formatting titles) and brief overview of its content. (This is usually part of the introduction.) • Clearly developed thesis statement making a claim about the purpose or effectiveness of rhetorical features of the core reading • Well-reasoned analysis of the core reading’s rhetorical strategies, supported with evidence • Use of at least one additional source found using the Ivy Tech Virtual Library databases. • Use of at least 10 quotes and/or paraphrases of the core reading and/or your outside source, cited using correct in-text citations • APA or MLA manuscript style, as specified by your instructor, with in-text citations and a References or Works Cited list including ALL sources used. (References or Works Cited list does not count in the minimum word-count requirement) • Observation of the conventions of Standard English • 750 words minimum for first draft (the minimum 150 words for your purpose statement is not included in this count) First Draft Rubric Criteria Points Effective purpose statement, minimum 150 words 5 Complete draft with introduction including clear thesis statement, body, and conclusion—minimum 750 words 10 Correct APA or MLA formatting, as specified by instructor, including correct APA References page or MLA Works Cited page; use of at least 10 quotes or paraphrases, using correct APA or MLA in-text citations 5 TOTAL 20 points FINAL DRAFT - Due in Module 8 (125 points) 1. Cover Letter Specifics 2. Final Draft Specifics • Minimum 150 words (successful cover letters are often longer) • Address letter to your instructor • Answer at least 3 of the 6 questions below (where applicable) provide brief, specific examples of the following in your cover letter: o What is your primary motivation or purpose for writing your draft? Who is your intended audience? What revisions did you make in order to improve how you accomplish this purpose and/or appeal to this audience? o What feedback did you receive from your peers? How did you use this feedback to revise your draft? How do these revisions improve your draft? o What feedback did you receive from other sources, such as your instructor or tutors? How did you use this feedback to revise your draft? How do these revisions improve your draft? o What have you decided to revise in your draft, apart from feedback you received? Why? How do these revisions improve your draft? o What problems or challenges did you encounter while writing or revising your draft? How did you solve them? o What valuable lessons about writing effectively have you learned as a result of composing this project? • Place the cover letter at the beginning of your final draft, before the first page of your actual composition; delete your purpose statement • A Rhetorical Analysis of the core reading you wrote about for Writing Project 1 • Clear identification, early in the draft, of the core reading by full author name and full article title (following MLA or APA style for formatting titles) and brief overview of the article’s content (This is usually part of the introduction.) • Clearly developed thesis statement making a claim about the purpose or effectiveness of rhetorical features of the core reading • Well-reasoned analysis of the core reading’s rhetorical strategies, supported with evidence • Use of at least one additional source found using the Ivy Tech Virtual Library databases. • Use of at least 10 quotes (words, phrases, or key sentences) and/or paraphrases (key details or ideas rephrased in your own words), of the core reading and/or your additional outside source, cited using correct in-text citations • APA or MLA manuscript style, as specified by your instructor, with in-text citations and a References or Works Cited list that includes ALL sources used. (References or Works Cited list does not count in the minimum word-count requirement) • Observation of the conventions of Standard English • 1000 words minimum for final draft (the minimum 150 words for the cover letter is not included in this count) Criteria Description Effective cover letter, describing peer feedback, explaining how peer feedback was implemented, and Cover Letter explaining how these changes improved the draft Clear thesis that makes a claim about the purpose or effectiveness of rhetorical features analyzed in the Thesis core reading 10 10 Introduction/ Introduction attempts to express relevance of the analysis to the audience. Conclusion effectively Conclusion summarizes the content and conveys the significance of the analysis to the audience. 10 Organization Organization is supported with helpful and effective transitions and with coherent arrangement. 15 Analysis Final Draft Rubric Points Effective rhetorical analysis of core reading demonstrated, with sufficient evidence used to support the thesis 30 Voice, tone, and stance are appropriate and effective for material, purpose, and audience. Style is clear, Style consistent, and cohesive, appealing appropriately to the intended audience. 10 Conventions Clear control of language conventions with few distracting typos or errors 10 Appropriate use of at least 10 quotes (words, phrases, or key sentences) and/or paraphrases (key details Evidence and or ideas rephrased in your own words) from the core reading and/or additional outside source, cited using 10 citations correct in-text citations Use of at least one relevant additional source found using the Ivy Tech Virtual Library databases. The Outside writer’s voice is discernable from the author of the source and discussion of source information is Source discernable from source information itself. 10 Document Correct document format in APA or MLA style, as specified by your instructor, including correct References 10 style page (APA) or Works Cited page (MLA) TOTAL 125 points NOTE: Proportional points may be deducted for final drafts that do not meet minimum word counts.
PROJECT SUMMARY AND RESPONSE Heller 1 Will Heller January 30th, 2019 ENG 111-01 Writing Project 1 Cover Letter Prof Poling, Much of the critique from my peers simply focused on my take with regard to the authors argument that government job guarantees to every individual will help to eliminated the need for unemployment insurance and related welfare programs. The fact that as many as 13 million unemployment people will be guaranteed to get a job and hence source of income means that the government will not have incur unemployment insurance and related welfare programs expenditures which are entirely meant to benefit individuals unable to secure job opportunities. In fact, the amount of government expenditures in relation to the overall benefit that will be created will be much more. With only $650 million budgetary allocation for creation of jobs for every American citizen, the federal government is likely to stimulate the economy to grow at rates more than what we have today. This is explained by the fact that the 13 million people who will be employed will increasing the purchasing power of our economy to levels. Besides this, one of the peer response with regard to my draft summary of the article reading implored on my personal opinion with regard to the article and how it resonates with me. With respect to this, Barkan proposal that the government needs to guarantee everyone a job as way of uplifting the lives of millions of poor Americans is a noble idea whose time has come. The United States is a land of plenty which is capable of taking care of needs of all its citizens. For each and every American citizen to truly live and embody the American Dream, it is a high PROJECT SUMMARY AND RESPONSE 2 time that we implement a single payer health insurance funded by the government, universal free education system and government funded jobs where millions of unemployed Americans will not be depended on government welfare programs but will instead help our economy grow. In an effort to make my final draft summary better, focused and informative, I have decided to put emphasis on the introductory paragraph. Specifically, I have realized the need to have a thesis statement that is succinct, and in line with the reading of the article given. Last but not least, the final draft incorporates the various changes suggested by the professor. The Government Should Guarantee Everyone a Good Job As patriotic citizen of this great nation who embodies the American Dream, where everyone has the opportunity to realize their full potential, I find this article relevant to all those embody the American Ideals. The reason I wrote this summary of the article titled “The Government Should Guarantee Everyone a Good Job,” with the purpose of enlightening my colleagues of the current burning issue in the United States. It is also meant to demonstrate how much the author of the mentioned article, Ady Barkan, uses various styles of language to pass on information and express himself in a way that is captivating and moving to the readers. Through it I am also able to express the various emotions of the author that he transmits to his readers, which will as a result shape their opinions or cause them to rethink their earlier formed decisions or beliefs about the topic at hand. Final Draft Article Summary and Response Various sectors of the U.S government have shown remarkable progress in the Education and Judicial sectors. The issue of guaranteed jobs has been slowly showing signs of PROJECT SUMMARY AND RESPONSE 3 improvement, maybe too little, because it has been crippled by racism and gender inequity. Guaranteeing jobs to the American citizens would go a long way in eliminating poverty. Other than that, it would disregard the need for having unemployment insurances well as other related welfare programs. It would also provide job security to employees by putting them in a better position to ask for raises and promotions. Throughout history, the agenda of a good-job guarantee has had a special place in the heart of American progressivism. Such people as Franklin Delano Roosevelt, proposed an Economic Bill of Rights in the year 1944 that was titled, “Right to employment,” after which he was assassinated and his wife, Coretta Scott King took over from him. The idea of good-jobs guarantee has been forgotten over time. “An esimation made by Mark Paul, Hamilton and Darity (2018) hold that this program would have up to 13 million people employed at the cost of roughly $650 every year, a cost less than the present military budget”. This transformative intervention has received support from a presidential aspirant, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, who recognizes “its political appeal,” which simply states that any US citizen who wants a job can get one, and that is financed by the federal government. An estimation made by Mark Paul, Hamilton and Darity hold that this program would have up to 13 million people employed at the cost of roughly $650 every year, a cost less than the present military budget. The author says that making this agenda, a “popular-education campaign” will be a critical step in ensuring that it is not just pushed to the side, but will be a feasible political concept come the next election period. In this way, the Democrats vying for the presidency will have no choice but to embrace it (Barkan, 2019) PROJECT SUMMARY AND RESPONSE 4 Ady Barkan in his article “The Government Should Guarantee Everyone a Good Job,” writes to express the importance of, and the ups and downs of the “good-job guarantee agenda,” through the use of rhetorical characteristics and symbols. “Progressives have begun to dream more boldly,” is a statement that initiates the author’s argument which maintains there has been a notable improvement in the way things are done. Through mentioning that this idea “can prevent individuals from fighting sexual harassment, discrimination, corporate abuse, and anti-union activity,” he makes his audience emotional and acquires public appeal. It makes the readers sympathize with the groups mentioned and in turn, make them more aware of their daunting situation. Dr. Martin Luther King is a symbol of civil rights movements, and the mention of his anniversary imparts the need of the benefactors of King’s work to commit themselves to “completing the great unfinished work.” There is a nudging urge to begin the campaigning of a good-jobs guarantee sooner than later. Franklin Roosevelt, yet another human rights activist is mentioned as a hero who in spite of seeing “over 8 million people” get employment, was gruesomely assassinated. Coretta King looked beyond the grave and saw that there was still more work to do, and so she continued with the work her husband could not finish, and her efforts yielded “the 1978 Full Employment and Balanced Growth Act.” The mention of these historians sparks the sense of patriotism in the hearts of the readers and makes them feel as though they owe it to their forefathers by not letting their efforts and sacrifices die in vain. The author further uses political persuasion to explain that there are opportunities that can be lost quite easily unless the consecutive elections yield better results than the previous ones. Such a sentiment can greatly influence one’s choice when casting their ballot, since they are more aware of how their choices can influence their lives, either directly or indirectly. It is PROJECT SUMMARY AND RESPONSE 5 evident that Ady, the author, is so passionate about this movement. He feels that the United States should not only be coined as “one of the richest nations in human history” just for the sake of it. He expresses that it needs to not only show on paper, but the same should be reflected in the daily lives of the Americans. PROJECT SUMMARY AND RESPONSE 6 References Barkan, A. (2019). The Government Should Guarantee Everyone a Good Job. Retrieved from https://www.thenation.com/article/the-government-should-guarantee-everyone-agood-job/ Paul, M., Darity Jr, W., & Hamilton, D. (2018). The Federal Job Guarantee–A Policy to Achieve Permanent Full Employment. Washington: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Tutor Answer

MrMark
School: New York University

Attached.

(Surname)1
Name
Instructor
Course
Date
Purpose of the draft is to answer the “Examine the Relevance”
While unemployment rates in the recent couple of years have continued to climb down
due to continuous growth in the economy, the number of those unable to get employment
opportunities is still quite significant. To address the question of unemployment and the various
socioeconomic consequences associated with it, progressives advocate that the government
should guarantee and provide employment opportunities for all. With budgetary allocation of
$650 billion which is less than what is spent on the army each year, the government will be able
to create about 13 million job opportunities. Though this may be interpreted as overburdening of
the taxpayer, Barkan argues that the expenditure is likely to be offset elsewhere, particularly
from reduced unemployment insurance and other welfare expenditures by the government to
help this unemployed people. As an immediate impact, the economy is likely to grow at faster
rate due to increased consumption power from the 13 million jobs likely to be created if the
proposal is adopted.
In line with the above argument, this paper examines and answers the question of
relevance of the proposal that the government should guarantee everyone a job. In many aspects,
I find the proposed argument not only relevant but as something which is long overdue. As
starting point, I call upon my classmates to take up the mantle of reaching out to the large

(Surname)2
American public especially policy makers on why the go...

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Anonymous
Thanks, good work

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