Identify each Emergency Management Agency

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- In anticipation of next week’s reading, starting from your local community, identify each Emergency Management Agency /Governmental Authority linked in the chain to the Department of Homeland Security /Office of the President for the Declaration of a Disaster and provision of Federal Assistance.

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All groups - In anticipation of next week’s reading, starting from your local community, identify each Emergency Management Agency /Governmental Authority linked in the chain to the Department of Homeland Security /Office of the President for the Declaration of a Disaster and provision of Federal Assistance. Here are your choices: Chicago, IL Des Moines, IA Birmingham, Al Orlando, FL Cincinnati, OH Pittsburgh, PA Burlington, VT Bozeman, MT Talahassee, FL Jersey City, NJ Burlington, VT Rochester, NY Harrisburg, PA State College, PA Columbus, OH Boston, Mass New Orleans, LA Dallas, TX Salt Lake City, UT Honolulu, HI Nashville, TN Denver, CO Phoenix, AZ Once you complete this research into your chosen city, post that ion week three Discussion Board. Examples: - Continuation of the consolidation of countywide emergency communications services. - Implementation of Next Generation Public Safety Radio System (APCO P25 Phase II Trunked UHF Simulcast Repeated Radio System) to provide reliable, interoperable communications among Emergency Service Providers on a common frequency that meets or exceeds National Industry Standards with consideration given to include Public Transportation, Public Works, School Districts, etc. - Continued participation in the Regional Shared Services Assessment - Establish redundancy of the Erie County Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) / Dispatch Center among other County PSAPs with a regional approach, eliminating the need for a physical redundant center located in Erie County in the event of an evacuation or catastrophic failure. - Maintain current on emerging technology / systems (i.e. Next Generation 9-1-1), offering the most advanced services such as "Text-to-911, Photos, Streaming Video, Telematics, etc. - Establish a centralized record management system for all County Law Enforcement Agencies, a central repository of crime data; sharing information across jurisdictional boundaries; crime mapping; outstanding warrants, etc. - Remain current on geo-referenced, aerial, oblique image libraries and software (Pictometry) that are incorporated with the Computer-aided Dispatch (CAD) and Geographic Information System (GIS) software. These software resources are utilized 24/7 to provide a fast response to emergencies that threaten the lives and property of citizens of Erie County. GOALS - Continue to improve the operational capabilities of the Community Emergency Response Team to support Search & Rescue, Hazardous Materials, Medical, Logistical and Emergency Operations Center activities. - Improve the operational capabilities of the county animal response team, specifically the areas of recruitment/retention, public education and pet sheltering. - In cooperation with municipal governments and local fire departments, establish a consolidated specialized technical rescue team with confined space, trench, high angle, collapse, hazardous materials, and water rescue capabilities. - Obtain a comprehensive, independent report that includes short, intermediate, and long term goals with best practice recommendations to enhance the emergency management program. - Develop a rail safety (all hazard) plan for emergency preparedness to potential incidents and identify associated risk(s) to the community. - Continue to build a “stop gap” cache of equipment and supplies to meet the immediate response needs of the County. - Re-organize the County Emergency Operations Center Staff positions. - Implement an on-line damage reporting system for use by the public for reporting damages to municipal and county governments. - Assist and support the voluntary regionalization of municipal emergency management. - Expand the use of Knowledge Center within the County. - Work with various community groups to develop and promote “community resiliency” initiatives. - Update the County Hazard Mitigation Plan. References Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency (PEMA). (2018). Erie Emergency Management Agency Daily Report. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.pema.pa.gov/about/publicinformation /Daily%2520Incident%2520Reports/20180102%2520Daily%2520Report.pdf&sa=U&ved =0ahUKEwjvuIzx4__YAhWymeAKHVJZCMoQFggUMAU&client=internal-udscse&cx=007572080359491747877:fpjvp7ckpyy&usg=AOvVaw1-jTQruj2zoDMoi9xnZJ_0 Thompson, C. (2016). U.S., Canadian Coast Guard perform two Lake Erie rescues early Monday. Windsor Star. Reterived from http://windsorstar.com/news/localnews/u-s-canadian-coast-guard-perform-two-lake-erie-rescues-early-monday Upper Michigan Resources. (2018). Coast Guard cutters break ice as Lake Erie freezes Retrieved from http://www.uppermichiganssource.com/content/news/Coast-Guardcutters-break-ice-as-Lake-Erie-freezes-467904933.html Erie Department of Public Safety. (2018). Local Emergency Management Coordination. Retrieved from https://www.eriecountypa.gov/county-services/safetylaw/erie-county-department-of-public-safety/public-safety/emergencymanagement/local-programs.aspx My chosen city: Pittsburgh, PA As said, all incidents start at the local level. In a perfect world in emergency management, when Pittsburgh has a disaster in the city, local emergency responders respond. Once that a disaster or emergency that is “overwhelming” the local agencies the city’s emergency management agency/coordinator enacts the Pittsburgh Emergency Operations Plan and notifies the city administrators of the issue to declare a disaster emergency and open the City’s Emergency Operations Center to assist with coordinating the disaster and provide any unmet needs at the scene level. Although this is a local incident, The City of Pittsburgh in cooperation with Allegheny County operates a 9-1-1 center and an Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The 9-1-1 center and the EOC have listings of resources available from the City assets as well as resources available from surrounding municipalities and the Southwestern Pennsylvania Emergency Response Group (SWPERG) via mutual aid agreements (City of Pittsburgh EOP 2007 p.4). Once the county believes this incident is deemed a county disaster, Alleghany County Commissioners sign a county declaration of disaster and provide additional county resources and agencies to support the City of Pittsburgh. If large enough and look to the neighboring counties and possibly SWPERG/Region 13 Counter Terrorism Task Force for assistance. If the incident is large enough to exhaust these efforts, the states watch officer at PEMA could be contacted to inform Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency (PEMA) of the situation. If the incident is large enough and resources need to allocate from around the state, the Commonwealth Resource Coordination Center (CRCC) would be open and the state’s emergency operation plan would be enacted. The Director of PEMA will brief the Governor of the situation and discuss the enactment of a State Disaster Declaration which would give further resources from the state as well as an easement on restrictions and free up money to support the city, county, and state during and after the event. The Governor at this time can call on other states to provide resources through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact. Once the EMAC has been exhausted or resources could not be allocated, the Governor can call on the President for federal assistance for resources and funding for the disaster. The President along with key staff from the White House and FEMA would discuss the declaration of disaster to determine if one is suitable for the incident. The Presidential Disaster Declaration could take time to process and sign as FEMA and the state will exhaust other resources and funding before federal support. Reference: City of Pittsburgh. Emergency Operations Plan. June 2007. p. 4 I & R for week’s three readings: A presidential disaster declaration is not only a set of words used to describe an incident. It carries the power of determining the types of federal assistance that will be provided and upholds a president’s oath under the Constitution (Sylves, 2015, p. 92, 95). The Robert T. Stafford Act provides the legal authority for federal governments to assist states once they have been declared as a major disaster or emergency (Stafford Act, 2016). Even though the President has been given the power to declare or not a major disaster, there is a process to request federal assistance. This process includes a Preliminary Damage Assessment (PDA) to determine if the incident meets FEMA’s criteria to receive federal assistance (Sylves, 2015, p.111). Sylves mentions that governors’ request presidential emergency when a disaster seems imminent (p.114). This implies that the pre-event response stage of a disaster, is crucial in case it becomes reality (Sylves, 2015, p.114). Therefore, we can see a difference between an emergency and a disaster declaration. On September 20, 2017, the Governor of Puerto Rico requested an expedited major disaster declaration and that same day, the President have the authorization (FEMA, n.d.). In this case, the PDA was waivered. Other disasters, as the 9/11 terror attack, highly impacted the president’s role including changes to the National Response Framework (Sylves, 2015, p.98). Same goes with the history of Triage systems. There are different Triage systems depending on the scenario, but the focus still is to provide the most efficient care to the greatest number of people (Koening & Schult’z, 2010, p. 181). • • • • • • • My community and citizens, in general, should be more informed about disaster policies and their implications. I truly believe that understanding the process to receive federal assistance, might answer some of the questions that arise during the recovery period. ---------------------------------Chosen City: Tallahassee, FL Leon County Emergency Medical Services (County Emergency Management, n.d.) Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare Agency (County Emergency Management, n.d.) Florida – State Emergency Response Team (Programs & Partners, n.d.) Florida Division of Emergency Management (Programs & Partners, n.d.) Florida – State Government (Sylves, 2015, p.104) Region IV – FEMA (FEMA, n.d) DHS / Office of the President (Sylves, 2015, p.104) County Emergency Management. (n.d.) Retrieved from https://www.floridadisaster.org/counties/ FEMA-4340-DR-VI (Expedited). (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.fema.gov/media library/assets/documents/148258 Koenig, K., & Schult’z, C. (2010). Koenig & Schult’z Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive Principles and Practices. New York: Cambridge University Press. Programs & Partners. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.floridadisaster.org/programs--partners/ Region IV: AL, FL, GA, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.fema.gov/region-iv-al-fl-ga-ky-ms-nc-sc-tn Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Public Law 93-288) as amended. (2016). FEMA. Retrieved from https://www.fema.gov/robert-t-stafford-disaster-relief-andemergency-assistance-act-public-law-93-288-amended Sylves, R. (2015). Disaster Policy and Politics: Emergency Management and Homeland Security (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: CQ Press. Local Response: Boston EMS (Ambulance crews, EMTs, Paramedics, dispatch), City of Boston Emergency Management Boston Mayor's Office of Emergency Management Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency Boston State Governor Charlie Baker FEMA DHS/Office of the President for the Declaration of a Disaster and provision of Federal Assistance The Stafford Act dictates how local and state governments must respond before requesting additional help and resources from the federal government (Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2013; National Response Framework, n.d.). It also dictates the circumstances of when the President has the power to act and declare a situation a major disaster (Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2013). In the event of an emergency or a disaster, the affected governments must respond to the event before requesting help on a needs-basis. The local government has the resources to conduct emergency management on a smaller scale and can request help from the state government when there is a need for coordination between multiple local governments (Sylves, 2015). In the circumstance that the state government is overwhelmed in its ability to fund the recovery costs, it has the ability to request help from the federal government (Sylves, 2015). For a governor to request a "major disaster" declaration, the Stafford Act requires that the state must first respond to the event and execute the state's emergency response plan (Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2013). In a circumstance where the request is not made, the President can provide federal assistance when necessary to save lives or prevent severe damage (Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2013; Sylves, 2015). Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2013. Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act. astho. Retrieved from http://www.astho.org/Programs/Preparedness/Public-Health-EmergencyLaw/Emergency-Authority-and-Immunity-Toolkit/Robert-T--Stafford-Disaster-Relief-andEmergency-Assistance-Act-Fact-Sheet/ National Response Framework. n.d. Overview of Stafford Act to Support States. Retrieved from https://www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nrf/nrf-stafford.pdf Sylves, R. (2015). Disaster Policy & Politics. Thousand Oaks, CA. Sage. Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, Public Law 93-288, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq., and Related Authorities United States Code, Title 42. The Public Health and Welfare, Chapter 68. Disaster Relief NOTE: Non-Stafford Act sections appear in U.S. Code sequence for convenience. Sec. 101. Sec. 102. Sec. 103. Congressional Findings and Declarations (42 U.S.C. 5121)..................1 Definitions (42 U.S.C. 5122) .................................................................1 References (42 U.S.C. 5123) ..................................................................3 Title II – Disaster Preparedness and Mitigation Assistance Sec. 201. Federal and State Disaster Preparedness Programs (42 U.S.C. 5131) ....4 Sec. 202. Disaster Warnings (42 U.S.C. 5132) ......................................................5 Sec. 203. Predisaster Hazard Mitigation (42 U.S.C. 5133) ...................................5 Sec. 204. Interagency Task Force (42 U.S.C. 5134) ............................................10 Title III – Major Disaster and Emergency Assistance Administration Sec. 301. Waiver of Administrative Conditions (42 U.S.C. 5141) ......................11 Sec. 302. Coordinating Officers (42 U.S.C. 5143) ..............................................11 Sec. 303. Emergency Support and Response Teams (42 U.S.C. 5144) ...............12 Sec. 304. Reimbursement of Federal Agencies (42 U.S.C. 5147)........................12 Sec. 305. Nonliability of Federal Government (42 U.S.C. 5148) ........................13 Sec. 306. Performance of Services (42 U.S.C. 5149) ...........................................13 Sec. 307. Use of Local Firms and Individuals (42 U.S.C. 5150) .........................13 Sec. 308. Nondiscrimination in Disaster Assistance (42 U.S.C. 5151) ...............14 Sec. 309. Use and Coordination of Relief Organizations (42 U.S.C. 5152) ........15 Sec. 310. Priority to Certain Applications for Public Facility and Public Housing Assistance (42 U.S.C. 5153) .......................................15 Sec. 311. Insurance (42 U.S.C. 5154) ..................................................................16 -Prohibited Flood Disaster Assistance (42 U.S.C. 5154a).....................16 Sec. 312. Duplication of Benefits (42 U.S.C. 5155) ............................................18 Sec. 313. Standards and Reviews (42 U.S.C. 5156) ............................................19 Sec. 314. Penalties (42 U.S.C. 5157) ...................................................................19 Sec. 315. Availability of Materials (42 U.S.C. 5158) ...........................................19 Sec. 316. Protection of Environment (42 U.S.C. 5159) ......................................20 Sec. 317. Recovery of Assistance (42 U.S.C. 5160) .............................................20 Sec. 318. Audits and Investigations (42 U.S.C. 5161) .........................................20 Sec. 319. Advance of Non-Federal Share (42 U.S.C. 5162) ................................20 Sec. 320. Limitation on Use of Sliding Scales (42 U.S.C. 5163) .........................21 Sec. 321. Rules and Regulations (42 U.S.C. 5164)..............................................21 Sec. 322. Mitigation Planning (42 U.S.C. 5165) ................................................21 Sec. 323 Minimum Standards for Public and Private Structures (42 U.S.C. 5165a) ...................................................22 i Sec. 324. Sec. 325. Sec. 326. Management Costs (42 U.S.C. 5165b) ................................................23 Public Notice, Comment, and Consultation Requirements (42 U.S.C. 5165c) ....................................23 Designation of Small State and Rural Advocate (42 U.S.C. 5165d) ....24 Title IV – Major Disaster Assistance Programs Sec. 401. Procedure for Declaration (42 U.S.C. 5170) ........................................25 Sec. 402. General Federal Assistance (42 U.S.C. 5170a) ....................................26 Sec. 403. Essential Assistance (42 U.S.C. 5170b) ...............................................27 Sec. 404. Hazard Mitigation (42 U.S.C. 5170c) .................................................29 Sec. 405. Federal Facilities (42 U.S.C. 5171) ......................................................32 Sec. 406. Repair, Restoration, and Replacement of Damaged Facilities (42 U.S.C. 5172)...............................................32 Sec. 407. Debris Removal (42 U.S.C. 5173) .......................................................38 Sec. 408. Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households (42 U.S.C. 5174) ..39 Sec. 410. Unemployment Assistance (42 U.S.C. 5177) .......................................44 -Emergency Grants to Assist Low-Income Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers (42 U.S.C. 5177a) .....................................45 Sec. 412. Benefits and Distribution (42 U.S.C. 5179) .........................................46 Sec. 413. Food Commodities (42 U.S.C. 5180) ..................................................46 Sec. 414. Relocation Assistance (42 U.S.C. 5181) ..............................................46 Sec. 415. Legal Services (42 U.S.C. 5182) ..........................................................47 Sec. 416. Crisis Counseling Assistance and Training (42 U.S.C. 5183) ..............47 Sec. 417. Community Disaster Loans (42 U.S.C. 5184) .....................................47 Sec. 418. Emergency Communications (42 U.S.C. 5185) ...................................48 Sec. 419. Emergency Public Transportation (42 U.S.C. 5186)............................48 Sec. 420. Fire Management Assistance (42 U.S.C. 5187) ...................................48 Sec. 421. Timber Sale Contracts (42 U.S.C. 5188) .............................................48 Sec. 422. Simplified Procedure (42 U.S.C. 5189) ................................................49 Sec. 423. Appeals of Assistance Decisions (42 U.S.C. 5189a).............................50 Sec. 424. Date of Eligibility; Expenses Incurred Before Date of Disaster (42 U.S.C. 5189b) .....................................................50 Sec. 425. Transportation Assistance to Individuals and Households (42 U.S.C. 5189c) ......................................................50 Sec. 426. Case Management Services (42 U.S.C. 5189d) ...................................51 Sec. 427. Essential Service Providers (42 U.S.C. 5189e) .....................................51 Sec. 428. Public Assis ...
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Running head: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCIES

Emegencies Management Agencies
Institution Affiliation
Date

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EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCIES

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Emergency management agencies in Pittsburgh
An emergency is an instance or occasion in which the willpower of the president and
federal aid is required to supplement local and state capabilities and efforts to protect property
and save lives (Sylves, 2014). From the aftermath of fireworks of the forth July and Hurricane
Ivan, the Emergency Management and Homeland Security (OEMHS) office has been a major
player in a...

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