Advanced Adult Development summary

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Select a 3-4 of critical thinking questions from each chapter and answer them in written format, summarizing key ideas, evaluating information, and relating it to real life experiences.

Note: The critical thinking questions appear in blue in the margins of pages throughout each chapter, not at the end of chapters.

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rtc -- Introduction to Adult Basic Concepts in Adult Development Sources of Change Normative Age-Graded I nfluences Biology Shared Experiences lnternal Change Processes Normative History-Graded I n{luences DeYelopment Nonnormative Life Events Sources ol Stability Genetics MY JOURNEY OF adulthood began early, as many women of my generation, when I married shortly did that of after high school and began a family. But unlike many women in my peer group, I spent more time reading than I did having morning coffee with the other moms. I always took a book along to read while the kids had music lessons, base- ball practice, and orthodontist appointments. The library was a weekly stop along with the grocery store and was as important to me. By the time my youngest child began kindergarten, I enrolled in college a5 x f165[px1-a1 the age of 29, which was much older than the average at that time. For the next7 years, my children and I did our homework together at the kitchen Environment lnteractionist View A Word About "Age" Sefting the Course: Some Guiding Perspectives Life-Span Developmental Psychology Approach Bioecological Model of Development Developmental Research Methods Measures Ana lyses Desig ns table, counted the days to the next holiday break, and posted our grade A Final Word reports on the refrigerator. Today, as adults, they tell me that they can't Summary remember a time in their childhood when I wasn't in school. Just before Key Terms I Suggested Reading received my master's degree in developmental psychology, the marriage ended, and I spent some time as a single mother. I abandoned plans for a PhD and took a job at the universiry, teaching psychology courses and doing research on children's memory development. And just began to leave the nest, as my children I married a man whose own journey of adulthood had brought him to fatherhood rather late, making me stepmother of 5-year-old, who quickly became an important part of my life. a Not too Chapter i much later, the grandchildren began to arrive, and life settled into a nice routine. Ir I had clone it all-marliage, parenthood, career, singie palenthood, stepparenthood, and grandparenthood; mv life u.as fu1l. Suddenly, my 50th birthda,v loomed, and it seemed to represent so much more to me than tr.rrning "just another year older." The half-century mark was quite a shock and caused me to reevali-rate my life. I realized that I wasn't read,v to ride slor,vly into the sunset for the next several decades; I needed to get back on track and move fonvard with my education. The next fall I entered a PhD program in life-span developmental psychology at the Universiw of Georgia. It was an invigorating experience ancl also very humbling. Instead of being the teacher, I rvas the student. Instead of- supervising the research project, I was the neu.bie. L.rstead of being the one giving advice, I was the one rvho had to ask where the bookstole was, where to park, and how to use the copv machine. But 3 years later I rvas awarded a red-and-black hood in a formal graduation ceremonl. 1vi1[ my children and grandchildren, parents, and siblings cheering for me frorn the audience. Nor,r, I teach part rime at the Ioca1 universiw and lvrite college textbooks. l'welve years ago my husband and I moved from our city home to a country home in soLltheastern Florida, complete rvith a cypress stand in the front vard and a sma1l pine forest in the back. Our neighbors have horses, and we rvake to roosters crow'ing in the rnorning. Two of our younger grandchildren live nearby, and my typical day consists of teachine a university class in the morning and then picking up mt'15-year-oid grandson at high school so he can drive r-ne around town on lvhatever errands I might have. He .just got his learner's permit, and I am enjoying that magical year when he seemingly wants to go ever'1.vr..here with r.ne. Last rveek I helped my 10-vear-old grandson lvith his fifth-grade science project-gror,ving flowers with ,rnd without magnesium sulfate to see which have the brightest blooms. It was fun, but I rvas a 1itt1e irked when "-"ve" only got a B+. Three years ago, rvith three adult children and eight grandchildren ranging in age fiom 7 to 25, my husband and I felt that our lives r,vere settling down a little. But then my older son, rvho had been divorced for many vears (and had for-rr children in college), remarried and surprised us rvith Miss Lily Pearl-Grandchild #91 She just had her first birthday last lr.eek, and rve can't imagine how we ever thought our family was compiete without her. So if there is a message to take from this book it is tl-ris: development doesn't stop at 21-or 40 or 65. Yor-rr'life will never srop sur;-,rising you rintil you breathe your last breath. My wish for you is that the surprises are mostly happy ones. seemed E a si e ui-l* r: cen-"t s i ;: A i,i il lt i-.1 ;:'r, *l.l* 6 tn i.: r. r. Tlris book is about adult development, and it follolvs the tenets of ,,r',,,,,',ir,':',i'::,r'':n.i;:.i psvcho{*g;r-, the ficld of studv that deals r.vith the behavior, thoughts, and emotions ol individuals as they go through various parts of the life span. The flcld also includes child development, adolescent development, and :iil,ir. ii,,',,,.l',:rrtc,-,'. which is the particular concern of this book. We are interested in the changes that take place r'vithin individuals as they progre.ss frorn emerging adr-ilthood (when adolescence is ending) to the er-rd of life. Although marr1, autobiographies give first-person accounts of people's lives and man,v interesting stories about people's experiences in adulthood, this book is based sn ea..;:',rii:.ii reseffrc!!.-scientific studies of observable events that are measured and evaluated objectively. V/hen personal accolrnts and examples :rte used (including the opening story about my life), they are chosen to illustrate concepts that have been qrrefully researched. Son're of you reading this are just beginning the journe,v of your ou'n adult life; some of you irre partway along the road, having traveled thror-rgh your 20s, 30s, and perhaps 40s. 50s. and bevond- V/hatever \/oLrr Age. l,olr are travelins. movins throush the vears Introduction to Adult Development and through the transformations that come along the way. tWe do not all follow the same itinerary on this journey; you may spend a long time in a location that I do not visit at all; I may make an unscheduled side trip. Or we may visit the same places but experience them very differently. Every journey has individual differences, aspects that are unique to the individual. You may not have experienced the trials of single parenthood as I have or the joys of grandparenthood, and I cannot relate to the independence you must feel when living alone or the confusion you experience when your parents divorce. Likewise, there also have to be some commonalities, rypical aspects of adult life that most of us can relate to (either now or in the future). Most of us have moved out of our parents' homes (or plan to soon), experienced romantic relationships, entered college with some plans for the future, and either started a family or given some serious thought to parenthood. tVithout these common hopes and experiences, there would be no reason for a book on adult development. My goal for this book is to explore with you both the uniqueness and the common grounds of our adult lives. Two of the concepts featured in this book are stability and change during the developmental process. Stability describes the important parts of our selves that make up a consistent core. It is the constant set of attributes that makes each of us the individuals that we are throughout our lifetimes. In other words, yow 4}-year-old self will be similar to your Z}-year-old self in some ways, as will your 60-year-old self. For example, one of the stable themes of my adult life is a love for books. In fact, it goes back to my childhood. Some of my most prized possessions are the books in my library. I always have several books sitting around the house that I am in the process of reading. And 10 years ago I started a book club in my neighborhood that has become a big source 'What are some of the stable themes of joy for me. Another theme that keeps popping up in my life is children, of 1.our life? How do you think these beginning early on with three younger sisters, then my own children, then my themes will be expressed 20 years lrom stepdaughter, nieces and nephews, then grandchildren. I have always had a toy now? box in my living room and sippy cups in the kitchen cabinet. In fact, the two themes of books and children often mix. I send books on birthdays for the children on my gift list, and when visiting children spend the night, I have a shelf of children's books in the guestroom, some of them that belonged to their own parents so many years ago. Perhaps you find stabiliry in your life in terms of play- ing a musical instrument or participating in sports. The genre of books I read may change over the years, and your choice of musical selections or sporting events may be different from time to time, but the core essence of these stable themes remains an integral part ofour lives. Change is the opposite force to stabiliry. It is what happens to us over time that makes us different from our younger (and older) selves. An example from my life that illustrates this is travel. fu a child I never traveled too far out of my home state of Florida. Almost all my relatives lived nearby, and those who didn't were more than happy to visit us in the warm climate during the winter. In fact, at the age of 35,I -- Middle adulthood can bring large-scale changes in lifestyle and interests, as illustrated by this photo of author Barbara Bjorklund along the city wall of Siena, ltaly, Chapter 1 much later, the grandchildren began to arrive, and life setded into a nice routine. seemed I a I I L L I had done it all-marriage, parenthood, It career, single parenthood, stepparent- hood, and grandparenthood; my life was full. Suddenly, my 50th birthday loomed, and it seemed to represent so much more to me than turning "just another year older." The half-century mark was quite a shock and caused me to reevaluate my life. I realized that I wasn't ready to ride slowly into the sLrnset for the next several decades; I needed to get back on track and move forward with my education. The next fall I entered a PhD program in life-span developmental psychology at the University of Georgia. It was an invigorating experience and also very humbling. Instead of being the teacher, I was the student. Instead of supervising the research project, I was the newbie. Instead of being the one giving advice, I was the one who had to ask where the bookstore was, where to park, and how to use the copy machine. But 3 years later I was awarded a red-and-black hood in a formal graduation ceremony with my children and grandchildren, parents, and siblings cheering for me from the audience. Now I teach part time at the local university and write college textbooks. Twelve years ago my husband and I moved from our ciry home to a country home in southeastern Florida, complete with a cypress stand in the front yard and a small pine forest in the back. Our neighbors have horses, and we wake to roosters crowing in the morning. Two of our younger grandchildren live nearby, and my rypical day consists of teaching a universiry class in the morning and then picking up my 15-year-old grandson at high school so he can drive me around town on whatever errands I might have. He just got his learner's permit, and I am enjoying that magical year when he seemingly wants to go everywhere with me. Last week I helped my l0-year-old grandson with his fifth-grade science project-growing flowers with and without magnesium sulfate to see which have the brightest blooms. It was fun, but I was a little irked when "we" only got a B+. Three years ago, with three adult children and eight grandchildren ranging in age fromT ro 25, my husband and I felt that our lives were settling down a little. But then my older son, who had been divorced for many years (and had four children in college), remarried and surprised us with Miss Lily Pearl-Grandchild #9! She just had her first birthday last week, and we can't imagine how we ever thought our family was complete without her. So if there is a message to take from this book it is this: development doesn't stop at 27-or 4O or 65. Your life will never stop surprising you until you breathe your last breath. My wish for you is that the surprises are mostly happy ones. Basic Concepts in Adult Development This book is about adult development, and it follows the tenets of developmental psychology, the field of study that deals with the behavior, thoughts, and emotions of individuals as they go through various parts of the life span. The field also includes child development, adolescent development, and adult development, which is the particular 'W'e concern of this book. are interested in the changes that take place within individuals as they progress from emerging adulthood (when adolescence is ending) to the end of life. Although many autobiographies give first-person accounts of people's lives and many interesting stories about people's experiences in adulthood, this book is based on empirical research-scientific studies of observable events that are measured and evaluated objectively. tVhen personal accounts and examples are used (including the opening story about my life), they are chosen to illustrate concepts that have been carefully researched. Some of you reading this are just beginning the journey of your own adult life; some ofyou are parrway along the road, having traveled through your 20s, 30s, and perhaps 40s, 50s, and beyond. 'Whatever your age, you are traveling, moving through the years Introduction to Adult Development Eces of Change ffi**e**'t,'g*wutrw -\ge-Graded Influences first thought is-probablv of wl-rat -' -.r'': the phrase "sources of change"'1'our th"1 are linked to age and .-.;matile *g.-g,^a"d influences' iho" i'1flt"t"t' thev grow older' At least three rypes of ' -.:,-, = I -- - - r' - :- ::rr)st adults " ";;;;;;;;otiot' ..,i.tlces impinge on the typical adult' shared by all of us because we are all .- i .:': trf tire changes we see in ad'ults areprocesses' This is often represented bv . ,-r s;,ecies undergoing nattiral aging ' .- biological .loof,, tiiki"g away to mark the common changes that occur or skin - . ,..:'.'. ,.,.1-, .t .ng-..t ";t t;dt() "t' 'uth as l-rair gradually turning gray inwardly' occur but outside th-e ': : :-..rer' o.1r.^;;t ;;t "iitrt aittctiy from strength' The ,, ,-rii.t.tt-tscle tirr,r.,,uhith results in a gracluai loss of physical another' - - ,---lt phvsical changes occtLr varies qtltt " lot from one Person to ' - - -- .,-.:re,-1 nlore fullf in Chapter 2' - is dictated for most of us by our :".-::":;itct-i. Atrother normative influence that the normal sequence of adult life experi. ' - . : ' :.trued t t'" 'oeJti()tkdtfi'1ing "-i,rritro,,fnrarriage'collegegradtration'artdretiretnent'Eventhough ;l rhe timing of these experiences' \ve stili ,,. -ili.rnded ,;. ;;;:.';;h;;; j: -,. :t..,rnlarive" timing of these events. \7he-re we stat.rd in relation to the at ,.lf-rrorth. The middle-aged. mar-r still living . " - ... ...:tect ou, orrr, ,.nr'. of retired-all have f'[nds ' - : r::r:iii'll ,r.rdt'-'tt,i tht olcier working woman whose lives are out of sync " - -: ' .il i" i-p;;;o;' "'ptt1t of tl"'eii lives' but if those . - .:-. e\Pec,, ti-'" ** of ti-ming' it may lead.to some Personal doubts' In ^ is CEO of his Lu'n high-tech to^p"tit'',the middle-aged ' : --r.s itdlllt rvho - : : :-.:-:let.-s \.r., school, ,.rnd tl-re ottogt'-'"ii"''' rvho finishes the Boston Mara- : :. .raon ro celebrate over ..rnd above t\-re face value of their accomplishrnents. ' .::.-: tl-r.- social clock can have is ageism, a Wpe of discrin-iinatior-r in which ' -: i ::-:e.f rr.c1 clecisions are rnatle othe.s based solely on the f:rct that "b.r..t r" -': - :.:::;r,rlttr age group. Older irdults arc somerimes perceived to be cranky, --: :-.. -..J less valr-rable than l.ounger people. 'I'hese stereorypes are perpetu- . . -.1)ms. commercials, birthday cards, and jokes on Facebook. Emerging :.- "- : . ':* --: :.rrgets of ageism, when they are perceived as being less capable than rr" - : - - , :-i.rs or u'hen they are stereotvped as delinquents because of their style ' : -- - ::::cir. One of 61, goals for this book is to give a realistic and respectful -'"t :_:.,.n " J" aqe. -'.''-:-,r:r-:i-on of the infrtre'ce .f the social crock in virtuafly orfi curtures is -.-:--rrcnces irs.sociated u,ith fhnrilv ,,r:.,U:.. exarnple, .h. ;ra"-r;;;;;;; --' :--: :..rrer.rrhood, and once their flrst child is U"."iiir"f-fregin a fixed par_ " : ' - ' '' .tp.ri:l:.: with otl-rer parenrs that move *rrr, their childre,,s :-:.:.:r.\,. roddlerhood, the school "r.,rf 1,ears, adoles..n.I, pr.p"."tior, ,o ,- "rd Chapter 1 had never been on an airplane. But when I married my current husband (and no longer had children living at home), I had the opportuniry to travel with him to national conferences and accompany him on international trips as he collaborated with colleagues and worked as a visiting professor around the world. In the last 20 years, we have spent extended periods of time in Germany, Spain, and New Zealand. \7e have made shorter trips to Japan, China, Italy, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, England, Scotland, \7a1es, Austria, Switzerland, and Egypt. Last year we made it to Paris! I am an expert packer, and my office is filled with fra-.J photos I have taken in many exotic locations. To compare myself at 30 and 50, my travel habits would consriture a dramatic change. Other examples of change in the adult developmental process occur when one becomes a parent, switches careers, or decides to move to anorher part of the country (or to an entirely different country). One way to view the journey of adulthood is to consider both the stabiliry and fie change that define our lives. Still another way of looking at this journey is gauging how straight the road is. Some stretches of our lives are continuous-slow and gradual, taking us in a predictable direction. My gardening certainly fits this definition. In my earliest apartments I had potted plants, and when we rented our first house, I persuaded the iandlord to let me Put in a small flower garden. As our yards have grown bigger, so have my garden projects. I enjoy plant fairs, trade plant currings with friends, and of course, read books about gardening. i nna lt relaxing to spend time "digging in the dirt." I have increased my knowledge and skill over the years. Now that our yard is measured in acres instead of square feet, I'm in heaven. So far I have a butterfly garden in the front yard, and I'm working on a vegetable garden in the back. Hopefully I wili continue to "develop" as a gardener for many years. In contrast, our lives also have stages, parts of the journey where there seems to be no progress for some time, followed by an abrupt change. Stages are much like driving on a (rriit country road for a long time and then getting onto a busy interstate highway (or vice versa). In my adult life I view the years of being home with my young children as a stage that was followed by the abrupt change of the youngest entering school and me starting college. I suddeniy wenr from having minute-to-minute, hands-on parenting duties to the rype that involve prepararions the night before and then dropping the children off at school in the mornin[. And I also went from having mostly tasks that involved physical work and concrete thinking skills (how to ger crayon marks offfie wails) to those that required abstract thinking (Psychology 101) ...
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Kishnewt2017
School: UIUC

Attached.

Running head: ADULT DEVELOPMENT

1

Adult Development
Name of Student:
Institute of Affiliation:
Date:

ADULT DEVELOPMENT

2

Adult Development
Growth and development in human beings are two things which occur gradually from
birth till death. There are various developmental stages in the life an individual. Some of these
stages include the following, child development, adolescent or teen development as well as adult
development and each of these stages occur at distinct times in the life of an individual.
Stable Themes of My Life
Stable themes can be described as individual attributes which cannot change throughout
an individual’s life. One of the stable themes in my life is the love for animals; this is an aspect
of me which has been there ever since I was a child. Animals provide a great company and I
don’t see myself being separated from them in my life. Additionally, I love reading books too;
another stable theme in my life. I have reads lots of literature since I started school and
developed a love for novels. I don’t think there will be any differences in my stable themes
twenty years from now. Even if I got into a career that requires much of my time, I will still be
able to set tim...

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Tutor went the extra mile to help me with this essay. Citations were a bit shaky but I appreciated how well he handled APA styles and how ok he was to change them even though I didnt specify. Got a B+ which is believable and acceptable.

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