Stress Relief Video Discussion

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timer Asked: Feb 5th, 2019
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Question Description

Watch the Stress Relief video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wElUb6OcOSE.

The video is meant to bring a laugh. Humor is a great tool for learning!

What went wrong and what went right? Be sure to think about your reading (I have attached chapters PowerPoint below) and utilize one or two examples from the video. After your original post, be sure to respond to two of your colleagues (screenshot attached)

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Chapter 1 What Does it Mean to be a Leader? ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 6e Learning Objectives • Understand the full meaning of leadership and see the leadership potential in yourself and others • Recognize and facilitate the six fundamental transformations in today’s organizations and leaders • Identify the primary reasons for leadership derailment and the new paradigm skills that can help avoid it ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 2 Learning Objectives • Recognize the traditional functions of management and the fundamental differences between leadership and management • Appreciate the crucial importance of providing direction, alignment, relationships, personal qualities, and outcomes ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 3 Learning Objectives • Explain how leadership has evolved and how historical approaches apply to the practice of leadership today ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 4 Leadership Influence based relationship among leaders and followers who intend real changes and outcomes that reflect their shared purposes ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 5 Exhibit 1.1 - What Leadership Involves ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 6 Leadership • Influencing others to come together around a common vision – Multidirectional – Noncoercive • Reciprocal in nature • Involves creating change • Qualities required for effective leadership are also needed to be an effective follower ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 7 Leadership • Effective followers are: – Self thinkers who do assignments with energy and enthusiasm • Leaders are: • Committed to the common good rather than self-interest • Firm in their beliefs ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 8 Paradigm Shared mindset that represents a fundamental way of thinking about, perceiving, and understanding the world ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 9 Exhibit 1.2 - The New Reality for Leaders ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 10 Management and Vision Management • Attainment of organizational goals in an effective and efficient manner through: • Planning and organizing • Staffing and directing • Controlling organizational resources Vision • Picture of an ambitious, desirable future for the organization or team ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 11 Exhibit 1.3 - Comparing Management and Leadership Source: Based on John P. Kotter, A Force for Change: How Leadership Differs from Management (New York: The Free Press, 1990) and ideas in Kevin Cashman, Lead with Energy, Leadership Excellence, (December 2010) :7; Henry Mintzberg ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 12 Theories of Leadership Great man theories • Leadership was conceptualized as a single Great Man who put everything together and influenced others to follow along based on the strength of inherited traits, qualities, and abilities Trait theories • Leaders had particular traits or characteristics that distinguished them from non-leaders and contributed to success ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 13 Theories of Leadership Behavior theories • Leaders’ behavior correlated with leadership effectiveness or ineffectiveness Contingency theories • Leaders can analyze their situation and tailor their behavior to improve leadership effectiveness • Known as situational theories • Emphasized that leadership cannot be understood in a vacuum separate from various elements of the group or organizational situation ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 14 Theories of Leadership Influence theories • Examined the influence processes between leaders and followers • Charismatic leadership - Influence based on the qualities and personality of the leader Relational theories • Focused on how leaders and followers interact and influence one another • Transformational leadership and servant leadership are two important relational theories ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 15 Exhibit 1.4 - Leadership Evolution ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 16 Derailment Phenomenon wherein individuals can’t advance further because of a mismatch between job needs and their personal skills and qualities ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 17 Fatal Flaws That Cause Derailment Performance problems • Failing to meet business objectives because of too much time promoting themselves and playing politics, a failure to fulfill promises, or a lack of hard work Problems with relationships • Being insensitive, manipulative, critical, and not trustworthy in relationships with peers, direct reports, customers, and others Difficulty changing • Not learning from feedback and mistakes to change old behaviors • Defensive, unable to handle pressure, and unable to change management style to meet new demands ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 18 Fatal Flaws That Cause Derailment Difficulty building and leading a team • Poor management of direct reports • Inability to get work done through others • Not identifying and hiring the right people Too narrow management experience • Inability to work effectively or collaborate outside their current function • Failing to see big picture when moved into general management position over several functions ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 19 Exhibit 1.6 - Learning to Be a Leader Source: Based on “Guidelines for the Apprentice Leader,” in Robert J. Allio, “Masterclass: Leaders and Leadership—Many Theories, But What Advice Is Reliable?” Strategy & Leadership 41, no. 1 (2013): 4–14. ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 20 Chapter 2 Traits, Behaviors, and Relationships Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved.May Maynot notbe bescanned, scanned, copied oror posted to atopublicly accessible website, in whole or in part. ©2015©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. copiedororduplicated, duplicated, posted a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 6e Learning Objectives • Outline some personal traits and characteristics that are associated with effective leaders • Identify your own traits that you can transform into strengths and bring to a leadership role • Distinguish among various roles leaders play in organizations, including operations, collaborative, and advisory roles, and where your strengths might best fit ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 2 Learning Objectives • Recognize autocratic versus democratic leadership behavior and the impact of each • Know the distinction between peopleoriented and task-oriented leadership behavior and when each should be used ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 3 Learning Objectives • Understand how the theory of individualized leadership has broadened the understanding of relationships between leaders and followers • Describe some key characteristics of entrepreneurial leaders ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 4 The Trait Approach • Traits: Distinguishing personal characteristics of a leader – Intelligence – Honesty – Self-confidence – Appearance • Great Man approach: Sought to identify the inherited traits leaders possessed that distinguished them from people who were not leaders ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 5 Exhibit 2.1 - Personal Characteristics of Leaders Sources: Bass and Stogdill’s Handbook of Leadership: Theory, Research, and Management Applications, 3rd ed. (New York: The Free Press, 1990), pp. 80–81; S. A. Kirkpatrick and E. A. Locke, “Leadership: Do Traits Matter?” Academy of Management Executive 5, no. 2 (1991), pp. 48–60; and James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner, The Leadership Challenge: How to Get Extraordinary Things Done in Organizations (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1990) ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 6 Characteristics of Leaders Optimism • Tendency to see the positive side of things and expect that things will turn out well Self-confidence • Assurance in one’s own judgments, decision making, ideas, and capabilities Honesty • Refers to truthfulness and nondeception Integrity • Quality of being whole, integrated, and acting in accordance with solid ethical principles Drive • High motivation that creates a high effort level by a leader ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 7 What are Strengths? • Natural talent or ability that has been supported and reinforced with learned knowledge and skills • Acts as the central point of focus in life – Enables leadership to be based on: • Energy • Enthusiasm • Effectiveness ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 8 Matching Strengths with Roles • Operational role – Vertically oriented leadership role – Executive has direct control over people and resources and the position power to accomplish results – Leaders • • • • Deliver results Assertive Analytical and knowledgeable Riveted on changing knowledge to vision ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 9 Matching Strengths with Roles • Collaborative role – Horizontal leadership role – Leader works behind the scenes and uses personal power to influence others and get things done • Proactive • Flexible • Manage ambiguity and uncertainty ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 10 Matching Strengths with Roles • Advisory role – Provides advice, guidance, and support – Responsible for developing broad organizational capabilities rather than accomplishing specific business results – Leaders • People skills • Ability to influence others • High levels of honesty and integrity ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 11 Exhibit 2.2 - Three Types of Leadership Roles ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 12 Behavior Approaches Autocratic • Centralizes authority and derives power from position, control of rewards, and coercion Democratic • Delegates authority, encourages participation, relies on subordinates’ for completion of tasks, and depends on subordinate respect for influence • Effective if subordinates possess decision-making skills • Effective when the skill difference between the leader and subordinates is high ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 13 Exhibit 2.3 - Leadership Continuum Source: Harvard Business Review. An exhibit from Robert Tannenbaum and Warren Schmidt, “How to Choose a Leadership Pattern” (May– June 1973). Copyright 1973 by the president and Fellows of Harvard College ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 14 Ohio State Studies • Developed and administered the Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ)to employees – Resulted in: • Consideration: Extent to which a leader is sensitive to subordinates, respects their ideas and feelings, and establishes mutual trust • Initiating structure: Extent to which a leader is task oriented and directs subordinates’ work activities toward goal achievement ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 15 University of Michigan Studies Employee-centered • Leadership behavior that displays a focus on the human needs of subordinates Job-centered • Leadership behavior in which leaders direct activities toward efficiency, cost cutting, and scheduling • Dimensions • Goal emphasis • Work facilitation ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 16 The Leadership Grid • Describes major leadership styles based on measuring both concern for people and concern for production – Two-dimensional model – Proposed by the University of Texas ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 17 Exhibit 2.4 - Leadership Grid® Source: The Leadership Grid figure from Leadership Dilemma—Grid Solutions by Robert R. Blake and Anne Adams McCanse (formerly the Managerial Grid by Robert R. Blake and Jane S. Mouton). Houston: Gulf Publishing Company, p. 29. Copyright 1991 by Scientific Methods, Inc. Reproduced by permission of the owners ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 18 Exhibit 2.5 - Themes of Leader Behavior Research Sources: Based on Marilyn R. Zuckerman and Lewis J. Hatala, Incredibly American: Releasing the Heart of Quality (Milwaukee, WI: American Society for Quality, 1992), pp. 141–142; and Mark O’Connell, Gary Yukl, and Thomas Taber, “Leader Behavior and LMX: A Constructive Replication,” Journal of Managerial Psychology 27, no. 2 (2012), pp. 143–154 ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 19 Individualized Leadership • Notion that a leader develops a unique relationship with each group member, determining: – Leader's behavior toward the member – Member's response to the leader ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 20 Exhibit 2.6 - Stages of Development of Individualized Leadership Sources: Based on Fred Danereau, “A Dyadic Approach to Leadership: Creating and Nurturing This Approach Under Fire,” Leadership Quarterly 6, no. 4 (1995), pp. 479–490, and George B. Graen and Mary Uhl-Bien, “Relationship-Based Approach to Leadership: Development of Leader–Member Exchange (LMX) Theory of Leadership over 25 Years: Applying a Multi-Level, Multi-Domain Approach,” Leadership Quarterly 6, no. 2 (1995), pp. 219–247 ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 21 Vertical Dyad Linkage (VDL) Model • Argues for the importance of the dyad formed by a leader with each member of the group – In-group relationship - Seen among members with whom leaders spend a disproportionate amount of time – Out-group relationship - Seen among members of the group who did not experience a sense of trust and extra consideration ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 22 Exhibit 2.7 - Leader Behavior Toward In-Group versus Out-Group Members Sources: Based on Jean François Manzoni and Jean-Louis Barsoux, “The Set-Up-to-Fail Syndrome,” Harvard Business Review (March–April 1988), pp. 110–113; and Mark O’Donnell, Gary Yukl, and Thomas Taber, “Leader Behavior and LMX: A Constructive Replication,” Journal of Management Psychology 27, no. 2 (2012), pp. 143–154. ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 23 Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) • Explores how leader-member relationships develop over time and how the quality of exchange relationships affects outcomes • Higher-quality relationship will lead to higher performance – Leading to greater job satisfaction for ingroup members ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 24 Partnership Building • Leaders strive to develop a positive relationship with each subordinate – Positive relationship will have a different form for each person – Performance and productivity gains can be achieved if the leader develops positive relationships with each subordinate – Third phase of the research ©2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. 25 Entrepreneurial Traits and Behaviors • Entrepreneurship – Initiating a business venture, organiz ...
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IvyTommy
School: Carnegie Mellon University

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