Problem-Solving Facilitation & Mediation Model Plan

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timer Asked: Feb 5th, 2019
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Question Description

This assignment includes two components and will be evaluated on these components. The first component is a detailed plan for facilitation in the form of an outline and the second will be on your delivery/presentation as a facilitator/co-facilitator.

1. Design a Detailed Plan for Facilitation in an Outline Format in Pairs (50 points)
Minimum Page limit requirement: Masters: Students: 18 to 20 pages, .

Below you will find the sections of the Problem-Solving Facilitation Model and you are asked to design a plan for your facilitation by integrating Schwarz's Skilled Facilitator Approach, Schuman IAF readings and any other readings we have covered in class. This facilitation model essentially has an opening, body, and closing that is capture dint he problem-solving model as discussed in our Schwarz text, so I encourage you to review these steps in details. Construct your outline by filling out the template below. Make sure you include this template exactly as you see it below and maintain all the labels and roman numerals. The hard copy outline is due on the day you function as a facilitator at RI. You should fill in each section of the outline with a detailed plan for facilitation that will include content, questions, activities, methods, forms, and plans for your processes and procedures. You will be designing a detailed plan for facilitation.

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RI PROJECT DESCRIPTION FACILITATION PLAN & OURLINE 100 POINTS (25% of the total grade in class) 9 Step Problem Solving Approach with Integration of the Schwarz’s Skilled Facilitator Approach (SFA) & IAF Handbook Concepts Learning Objectives: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Learning how to design a detailed facilitation plan with an outline Demonstrating how to apply the 9 Step Problem Solving Approach with the SFA & IAF Understanding how to make appropriate and professional facilitation interventions Delivering a developmental facilitation workshop by teaching participants Learning how to set up activities for a facilitation workshop using the Schwarz model Understanding how to serve as an ethical facilitator using the IAF guidelines Learning how to co-facilitate, develop memory logs, and present results to your clients Learning effective delivery as a facilitator Context and Topic for Facilitation Workshop: The topic for the workshop will be announced and discussed in class, so look for this update. Directions for the RI Assignment: This assignment includes two components and will be evaluated on these components. The first component is a detailed plan for facilitation in the form of an outline and the second will be on your delivery/presentation as a facilitator/co-facilitator. 1. Design a Detailed Plan for Facilitation in an Outline Format in Pairs (50% of grade) Minimum Page limit requirement: Masters: 20 pages, Doctoral Students: 26 pages, (each extra person to be added to a group should add 10 pages). Below you will find the sections of the Problem Solving Facilitation Model and you are asked to design a plan for your facilitation session by integrating Schwarz’s Skilled Facilitator Approach, Schuman IAF readings and any other readings we have covered in class. This facilitation model essentially has an opening, body, and closing that is captured in the 9 step problem-solving model as discussed in your book. Construct your outline by filling out the template below. Make sure you include this template exactly as you see it below and maintain all the labels and roman numerals. The hard copy outline is due on the day you function as a facilitator at RI. You should fill in each section of the outline with a detailed plan for facilitation that will include content, questions, activities, methods, forms, and plans for your processes and procedures. You will be designing a detailed plan for facilitation. Your written assignment will constitute 50% of your grade. 2. Facilitation and Co-Facilitation Delivery at RI (50 % of grade) During RI you will function as a facilitator and you will co-facilitate in dyads (pairs). During these sessions you should practice applying the Skilled Facilitator Approach by making appropriate interventions regularly. In fact, facilitators should use at least 3 formal interventions based on this model during their specific session. The topic for the workshop will be defined in class, so follow this scenario for the RI mock facilitation. You will be evaluated on your performance and delivery as a facilitator. It is important that you should create effective activities/methods that help participants practice special techniques during each step of the model. You will not function as a facilitator for the entire facilitation, but will do a section of the facilitation workshop for the time range that will be announced in class. This means that you must proceed where your classmates have left off and you should be prepared to facilitate at any point you are called to be the facilitator. Make sure you construct an effective and detailed memory log (this is the task of the facilitation recorder) as you will be evaluated on your memory log product as well. For the memory log, post details on process (what was asked or methods used by the facilitators) and content (what was generated by the workshop participants as a result). This should be added on to each group as we progress through all steps of the model. As a class we will compile the memory log to make a master memory log for use in our final project in the class, so this is very important. As you will see there are a number of steps involved in this entire process, so you are asked to progress by moving through the steps, integrating appropriate interventions, and practicing appropriate techniques we have learned in class. As an entire class we will be moving through the 9 step problem solving model and integrating the Schwarz’s Skilled Facilitator Approach in at each step. The Skilled Facilitator approach is overviewed in Chapter 1 of Schwarz and includes the following components: (1) Group Effectiveness Model, (2) A clearly defined facilitative role, (3) Useful in a range of roles, (4) Explicit core values, (5) Ground rules for effective groups, (6) The Diagnosis-Intervention Cycle, (7) Low-level inferences, (8) Exploring and changing how we think, (9) A process for agreeing on how to work together, (10) A systems approach. See the above major components of the Skilled Facilitator Approach of Schwarz book. Please make a note of these components and integrate these into the interventions in your mock facilitation session. Also, it is expected that you integrate topics and concepts from the IAF Handbook to supplement this approach. Specifically, you are expected to integrate the Schuman book with the Skilled Facilitator Approach presented by Schwarz. Schuman showcases a number of facilitation approaches such as the following: facilitation improv, graphic facilitation, and Mutual learning…etc. to name a few examples. USE THIS OUTLINE TEMPLATE: (Fill in a detailed plan for facilitation that will include content, questions, activities, methods, forms, and plans for your processes and procedures.) I. Introduction: Beginning the Facilitation Session 1. Introduction of the Facilitators (establish credibility) and parties (in terms of role distinctions) 2. Icebreaker that directly connects with the topic of this facilitation workshop 3. Gains commitment from parties to participate 4. Describe in detail the Skilled Facilitator Approach (SFA) & 9 problem solving steps 5. Educate parties about the Facilitation process; role of Facilitation and facilitator’s role 6. Uses a metaphor for describing what Facilitation is 7. Explain the benefits of Facilitation in terms problem solving Facilitation & SFA 8. Develops rapport/credibility with the parties 9. Statement of impartiality and neutrality (avoids authoritative stance) 10. Describes a mission statement and vision statement with the participants 11. Definition of the parameters of confidentiality as parties and the client agree on. 12. Statement of Schwarz behavioral guidelines or 9 ground rules and add ones if necessary 13. Activity involved with teaching the 4 core values 14. Determine decision making rule for the group: (ie. Majority rule, consensus…etc). 15. Answers to questions posed by the parties 16. Securing a joint commitment to begin 17. Description of logistics, scheduling and length of meetings (agenda) 18. Preview the session: what should parties expect will happen II. Body: A. Defining the Problem & Stating the Problem Statement 1. Definition of this step to participants 2. Overviews the objectives of this step 3. Designs 3 activities for this section such as: Nominal Group Technique, Storytelling, Improv, Idea Writing, Graphic Facilitation, Round Robin, Brainstorming or others… 4. Appropriate set up of the activity with clear instructions (to generate 100 items) 5. Determine the sequence for handling the issues 6. Plan or form for writing an appropriate memory log for this step 7. Develop a plan (activity) for how you will categorize the problems by grouping items that are similar together 8. Activity to generate the problem statement that describes the gap between the current state and the desired state. Recall: Write the problem statement in a positive tone and begin with a word that ends in (ING) such as “Enhancing diversity initiatives and programs at NSU to reflect a diverse educational context for all students on campus.” 9. Plan and review and debrief with group B. Root Causes: Uncovering hidden or known root causes to the Problem 1. Definition of this step to participants 2. Overview the objectives of this step 3. Clear overview and description of at least 3 activities you designed for this step such as: fishbone diagram NGT, storytelling, improv, idea writing, graphic facilitation, simulation, or others. Make sure to include a set of instructions for each activity. 4. 5. 6. 7. Explain how every participant will be involved in the process Describe the method to categorize the root causes Plan or form for writing an appropriate memory log for this step Plan for review and debrief with group C. Generating Criteria (setting parameters for the solutions) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Definition of this step to participants Overviews the objectives of this step Identify 3 activities for how to generate criteria for making good solutions with directions Describe what process you will use to categorize criteria for solutions Plan or form for writing an appropriate memory log for this step Plan for review and debrief with group D. Generating Alternative Solutions 1. Definition of this step to participants 2. Overviews the objectives of this step 3. Identify 3 activities for how to generate solutions with clear instructions 4. Describe what process you will use to categorize alternative solutions 5. Plan or form for writing an appropriate memory log for this step 6. Do not evaluate solutions & quantity is important (100 items necessary) 7. Write an appropriate memory log for this step 8. Plan for review and debrief with group E. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Assessing and Evaluating Options (Solutions) Definition of this step to participants Overviews the objectives of this step Design 3 activities or methods for this step with clear instructions Plan for writing an appropriate memory log for this step Plan for review and debrief with group F. Selecting Best Solutions 1. Definition of this step to participants 2. Overviews the objectives of this step 3. Design 3 activities or methods for this step with clear instructions 4. Plan for writing an appropriate memory log for this step 5. Plan for review and debrief with group NOTE: Encourage positive settlement ranges (Groups can keep all solutions, but may need to decide how to adopt them in terms of a timeline or action plan). III. Developing a Detailed Action Plan (Settlement Closing Phase) 1. Definition of this step to participants 2. Overviews the objectives of this step 3. Design 3 activities or methods for this step 4. Plan for writing an appropriate memory log action plan structure for this step 5. Plan for review and debrief with group 6. Remember to address: Incorporate deadlines for tasks/actions decided in the final agreement Discusses Who, What, When, Why, & How involved with each action Discuss consequences of not meeting deadlines IMPORTANT: We will skip the implementation step as it is not part of the actual workshop phase. IV. Evaluation of the Implementation 1. Design a evaluation assessment form and monitoring procedure of the action plan V. DELIVERY (in your Facilitation Plan in this section address how you will ensure the following during your session- that is, discuss how you will accomplish these): 1. Cultural sensitivity 2. Rapport 3. Responsive 4. Democratic 5. Authentic 6. Credible 7. Confident 8. Impartial/Neutral 9. Composure 10. Trustworthy 11. Professional 12. Dynamic 13. Interventions: List how or when you might use the following 10 components in your delivery as these are guiding features for your interventions. The Skilled Facilitator approach is overviewed in Chapter 1 of Schwarz and includes the following components for interventions: (1) Group Effectiveness Model, (2) A clearly defined facilitative role, (3) Useful in a range of roles, (4) Explicit core values, (5) Ground rules for effective groups, (6) The Diagnosis-Intervention Cycle, (7) Low-level inferences, (8) Exploring and changing how we think, (9) A process for agreeing on how to work together, (10) A systems approach. 14. Ethical: How will you ensure that you will be an ethical facilitator? What does Schwarz and IAF handbook say about ethical behavior to follow in facilitation? Overview these in detail in this section. The IAF refers to them as facilitator’s code of conduct. Do not copy and paste from the book…rather paraphrase. NOTE: Address how you will follow code of conduct/ethics based on the Skilled Facilitator Approach and the IAF Code of Conduct for Facilitators. TOPIC AND CONTEXT FOR THE FACILITATION WORKSHOP & WEEKLY ACTIVITY SESSIONS The context and audience for your Facilitation Plan & Activity Sessions FACILITATOR ROLE: You are an expert facilitator and have been training facilitators the 9-step problem solving model with integration of the Skilled Facilitator Approach and Principles from the IAF Handbook. YOUR CLIENT: You have been contracted by the local Crime Commission to address youth violence prevention in order to enhance safety and security in schools throughout the county, but starting with this county. Essentially the agency wants you to assist them to develop an action plan to tackle this issue while also teaching them “how” to be effective facilitators so after you leave they can facilitate a number of issues they may face after you leave. TOPIC TO ADDRESS: Specifically for this training, the agency wants you to help these facilitators to address the topic of “Youth Violence Prevention”. This is a very exciting topic for your ADR agency as there is a movement across the nation that is working with volunteer facilitators and members of the community to combat youth violence and better safeguard our schools and youth. It will be important to read up and look up research on this topic in order to contribute to the facilitation workshop. ...
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Tutor Answer

chemtai
School: Purdue University

please find the attached file. i look forward to working with you again. good bye

Running head: FACILITATION OUTLINE

1

Facilitation Outline
Name
Tutor
Institution
Course
Date

FACILITATION OUTLINE
Plan
I. Introduction: Beginning the Facilitation Session
1. My name is _ and I will be your facilitator for the next few days. Previously, I have
worked closely with different organizations and facilitators in training them on IAF
Handbook’s 9-step solving model in Facilitator approach and principles. We can all introduce
ourselves, stating our role in the agency, and what we hope to learn during the workshop.
2. How many of us experienced abuse at a young age? And can we remember how we dealt
with the trauma? Young people are one of the biggest victims of violence, either though peer
bullying and maltreatment at home.


Much awareness has not been raised on youth violence in schools, and the long term
impact that such experiences have on young people.



Young people who experience violence are at a high risk of mental health illnesses,
suicide, and are likely to turn to drug abuse as a coping mechanism (WHO, 2017).
Therefore, there is a need to raise more awareness on this area.

3. In order to build a thriving community, we ought to raise young people who understand the
impact of violence. This calls for facilitators to work closely with community members in
educating young people on this issue, and in combating youth violence in order to ensure that
young people especially in schools are safeguarded.
4. In order to effectively solve a problem, we first need to know what the problem is, consider
the existing opinions and facts about the problem, look at the situation from different angles,
establish basic root causes of the problem, have alternative solutions, have a best solution to
the problem, take time before making a decision, assign responsibility, and set a scale for
evaluating results.

2

FACILITATION OUTLINE
5. The facilitation process is about diagnosing and intervening to help a group of individuals
identify and solve problems affecting them. My role is to passively aid the process and help
us come up with solutions as a team.
6. A facilitator is a doctor, whose main responsible is aiding a diagnosis of a certain issue,
and helping people solve these problems through their ability to adhere to an outlined
solution guidelines.
7. As facilitators, we are responsible of generating the group’s commitment and
accountability, reducing defensiveness increasing motivation of team members, ensuring high
quality decision making, and increasing innovation.
8. Facilitation requires one to remain substantively neutral in order to help the group identify
the problem on their won, make decisions, and solve the problem. This impartiality and
neutrality helps ensure group effectiveness.
9. The facilitators will aim at “building greater commitment of team members and generate
shared accountability”
10. The mission of this forum is help us become more effective facilitators on a number of
issues including youth violence prevention, By end of this forum, we will be able to facilitate
various forums aimed at enhancing safety and security in schools though the ability to
address youth violence.
11. Anything said in this room shall remain confidential. All issues discussed in this forum,
shall remain confidential, especially matters which are confidential in nature. Therefore, after
the forum, we are expected to refrain from talking about what others said, to those who are
not part of the discussion.

3

FACILITATION OUTLINE
12. The discussion shall be guided by various rules, including; stating one’s views and only
asking genuine questions, sharing all relevant information, only using specific examples and
agreeing what certain words shall mean, explaining one’s intentions, focusing on the interest
of the group rather than one’s position, testing all assumptions, jointly designing the steps to
take next, and discussing all issues including the un-discussible and uncomfortable ones.
13. The core values will be emphasized through employing certain strategies and techniques
in addressing the challenges which may arise, embracing transparent, curiosity, ensuring
accountability, and embracing informed choice and compassion as a guide to ensuring that
the group functions effectively.
14. A consensus approach to decision making will be adopted during this workshop. In cases
where consensus is unattainable, a majority vote approach will be adopted in order to ensure
that majority’s needs are met.
15. Questions on how to successfully facilitate teams, how to deal with certain unforeseen
uncertain events, what to say, and when to say it shall be addressed during the workshop.
Questions will be answered continuously, hence everyone should feel free to interrupt and
ask questions.
16. These sessions will be very helpful in gaining facilitation skills. Participating in all
sessions for the planned five days will ensure one’s ability to grasp the various topics which
will be addressed, including generating shared accountability and creating more productive
meetings.
17. The team shall engage in a five day intense and instructor guided workshop aimed at
learning how to apply various facilitation skills and running more productive team. The
meeting shall be carried out from morning 8am to 5pm. The final day shall be dedicated to a

4

FACILITATION OUTLINE
Q&A session during which individuals will discuss various issues in groups and raise
questions.
18. During the workshop, we should also anticipate the informative sessions, including the
reviewing of core facilitation principles and how to apply these during a meeting, how to run
more productive meetings, and building greater commitment from the team. Application of
value based approaches in improving performs and ensuring improved working relationships
will also be addressed.
II. Body:
A. Defining the Problem & Stating the Problem Statement
1. In facilitation, we should always define the problem which the forum hopes to address. The
specific urgent issue which needs to be tacked: in our case, our problem statement is Youth
violence, especially in school settings.
2. Defining the problem ensures that everyone is on board, and helps us avoid digressing to
other topics which are not as urgent, or are being addressed during other forums. Therefore,
defining this problem ensures that we understand our scope. Just as it is impossible to take a
trip without deciding where one wants to go, it is impossible to effectively solve an issue
without defining the problem and its scope. Identifying the problem also ensures that we are
clear of where we are, and how far we are from where we desire to be.
3. As a facilitator, the best activity for addressing this issue would include telling stories of
those who have experienced youth violence in school and the impact that these experiences
have had on them. Participants should also state how often they have encountered this
problem, including possible circumstances and perpetrators. This will help ensure that every
party understands the specific problem being addressed.

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FACILITATION OUTLINE
4. One of the participants should come forward and tell their story, and their experiences with
youth violence, especially bullying and abuse by teachers in schools. The participant will
demonstrate how the violence started, who instigated it, how they dealt with it, and how this
affected them.
5. Handling the issue of youth violence will ensure its preventions by promoting on-site
screening and intervention especially with students who depict multiple risk factors of
violence including drug abuse. Intervening will also ensure that an inclusive school climate is
created, thus ensuring a sense of belonging for all students regardless of their differences of
personality, gender, race, and sexual orientation.
6. At this point, participants should write down what they have learned from the program so
far, including what has stood out the most in terms of youth violence. Participants should be
encouraged to write down what the specific problem is, the possible perpetrators, likely
victims, and the circumstances under which youth violence is likely to occur.
7. Youth violence is often carried out through bullying which could be verbal, emotional,
sexual, or through sexual abuse by fellow students. This could be influenced by racial or
sexual orientation discrimination. This violence could also be due to offender’s experiences
and psychological needs, which could be as a result of child experiences or drug abuse.
8. The aim of this program is “promoting tolerance in schools and address multiple risk
factors of violence among students, in order to prevent physical violence among young
people.”
9. During this program, we will carry out an in-depth analysis of current youth violence
trends, the effects, and prevalence in certain schools. This will make it possible to facilitate
community change in preventing violence among young people, especially in schools.

6

FACILITATION OUTLINE
B. Root Causes: Uncovering hidden or known root causes to the Problem
1. Uncovering the root cause of a problem is the identification of the deeper problem which
needs to be addressed in order to avoid only fixing symptoms. The symptoms we see on the
surface are merely the results of a deeper problem, which the root cause. This root cause
could be due to human nature or organizational issues.
2. Root cause analysis helps us answer questions of why the problem is occurring in the first
place and identify origin of the problem.


This helps use establish what happened, why it happened, and identify options of
reducing the likelihood of the problem occurring again in future.



Root causes are facts, and these are established by testing various assumptions. These
facts can be established by testing assumptions through data gathering and analysis.

3. As per graphical representations on youth violence trends, certain youth are a higher risk of
being perpetrators or victims. Looking at the data, certain characteristics such as body size,
personality, race, and sexual orientation are some of these risk factors. As an improvisation,
let’s try out creating a scene leading to youth violence. What activities are likely to transpire
before violence occurs. At least two members should also tell a story of their own experience
with youth violence, what transpired before the violence occurred? What was the context?

4. Each participant should write down some of the factors which they think are likely to
expose one to high risk of being a victim or perpetrator. Members will also participate in
improvising a youth violence scene and what transpired before the violence. Two members
will also tell stories of their own experiences with youth violence, and the circumstances
surrounding the violence.

7

FACILITATION OUTLINE
5. We can categorize youth violence into two root causes. These causes could be
psychological due to the mental state of the perpetrator and personality of the victim, could
be physical due to the victim’s race, age, gender or sexual orientation. Organizational
dynamics, especially the school’s administrator structure and policies could also be cause
(CDC, 2018).
6. What events transpired in the stories that have just been told? What events transpired
before violence erupted during the improvisation?

7. During these exercises, what were we trying to accomplish? According to our results,
what are the root causes of youth violence? As per the results, what should school and start
doing or stop doing? What lessons have we learned about root causes?
C. Generating Criteria (setting parameters for the solutions)
1. Criteria can be defined as a standard of judging a phenomenon. Criteria generation is
creation of decision options through which ideas are to be evaluated against. Criteria is the
parameters and metrics which will be used to measure the effectiveness of a solution. These
parameters are established based on the opinions, assumptions, facts, and principles
established by the team.
2. Our objective of setting parameters for the solution is to ensure that we make wise
decisions. Even though there are several alternatives to addressing the issue of youth violence
in schools, only specific ones should be selected. Generating criteria ensures that
characteristics are set for the desired result, hence the generated solutions are assessed as per
these parameters. Just like a traveler would choose a mode of transport based on criteria such
as speed, timing, and cost, when resolving youth violence, we will also need to establish such
parameters in order to select the most suited.

8

FACILITATION OUTLINE
3. In order to make good decisions, we will develop strategies and portfolio, screen these
strategies, and select the most suited. These will be based on ...

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Anonymous
Thanks, good work

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