Children and Exposure to Domestic Violence

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Question Description

I.MAKING A SINGLE THESIS STATEMENT FROM EACH ARTICLE

1.Read the abstract of the article

2.Make a simple declarative statement from the articles abstract.

3.Do this for each of your sources before you attempt your outline

ASA Format, alphabetical order.

4. The abstracts and references are attached.

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Introduction


Educational Impact

Evaluating an Online Program to Help Children Exposed to Domestic Violence: Results of Two Randomized Controlled Trials. By: Sargent, Kelli; McDonald, Renee; Vu, Nicole; Jouriles, Ernest. Journal of Family Violence. Jul2016, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p647-654. 8p.

Abstract: The current study reports the results of two randomized controlled trials investigating effects of an online program (Change A Life) designed to educate individuals about children's exposure to domestic violence (DV), and to increase individuals' self-efficacy for providing support to children exposed to DV. In both a community sample ( n = 110) and a college student sample ( n = 146), participants who completed Change A Life, compared to those who completed a control program, reported increased knowledge about children's exposure to DV. In the community sample, but not the college student sample, those who completed Change A Life also reported increased self-efficacy for helping children exposed to DV. Neither participant sex nor history of exposure to domestic violence moderated intervention effects.

Experiences of Domestic and School Violence Among Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients. By: Völkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Huemer, Julia; Jandl-Jager, Elisabeth; Abensberg-Traun, Marihan; Marecek, Sonja; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Plattner, Belinda; Skala, Katrin. Child Psychiatry & Human Development. Oct2016, Vol. 47 Issue 5, p691-695. 5p.

Abstract: The experience of cumulative childhood adversities, such as exposure to domestic violence or abuse by caregivers, has been described as risk factor for poor mental health outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. We performed an investigation of experience of violence in all patients aged 6 to 20 years who had consulted the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, as outpatients during the period of one year. We were using the Childhood Trauma Interview (CTI) in order to obtain information on the kind of violence. Seventy-five percent of all patients had reported experiences of violence. These youth were significantly more often involved in acts of school violence, thus a significant correlation between experience of domestic violence and violence at school could be revealed. The results of our study emphasize the need for interventions preventing violence both in domestic and in school environments.

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I. Introduction II. Educational Impact Evaluating an Online Program to Help Children Exposed to Domestic Violence: Results of Two Randomized Controlled Trials. By: Sargent, Kelli; McDonald, Renee; Vu, Nicole; Jouriles, Ernest. Journal of Family Violence. Jul2016, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p647-654. 8p. Abstract: The current study reports the results of two randomized controlled trials investigating effects of an online program (Change A Life) designed to educate individuals about children's exposure to domestic violence (DV), and to increase individuals' self-efficacy for providing support to children exposed to DV. In both a community sample ( n = 110) and a college student sample ( n = 146), participants who completed Change A Life, compared to those who completed a control program, reported increased knowledge about children's exposure to DV. In the community sample, but not the college student sample, those who completed Change A Life also reported increased selfefficacy for helping children exposed to DV. Neither participant sex nor history of exposure to domestic violence moderated intervention effects. Experiences of Domestic and School Violence Among Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients. By: Völkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Huemer, Julia; JandlJager, Elisabeth; Abensberg-Traun, Marihan; Marecek, Sonja; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Plattner, Belinda; Skala, Katrin. Child Psychiatry & Human Development. Oct2016, Vol. 47 Issue 5, p691-695. 5p. Abstract: The experience of cumulative childhood adversities, such as exposure to domestic violence or abuse by caregivers, has been described as risk factor for poor mental health outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. We performed an investigation of experience of violence in all patients aged 6 to 20 years who had consulted the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, as outpatients during the period of one year. We were using the Childhood Trauma Interview (CTI) in order to obtain information on the kind of violence. Seventy-five percent of all patients had reported experiences of violence. These youth were significantly more often involved in acts of school violence, thus a significant correlation between experience of domestic violence and violence at school could be revealed. The results of our study emphasize the need for interventions preventing violence both in domestic and in school environments. III. Behavioral Impact Attachment Security and Parental Perception of Competency Among Abused Women in the Shadow of PTSD and Childhood Exposure to Domestic Violence. By: Waldman-Levi, Amiya; Finzi-Dottan, Ricky; Weintraub, Naomi. Journal of Child & Family Studies. Jan2015, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p57-65. 9p. 3 Charts. Abstract: This study examined whether low perceived parental competency of abused women was associated with previous exposure to violence during childhood, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and attachment security. The study included 54 women who were recruited from shelters for abused women. Results revealed that abused women with PTSD were anxiously attached and women who had been exposed to violence during childhood felt less satisfaction from mothering. These findings may imply that abused women are not a homogenous group; the repeated traumatic events throughout their lives may result in the formation of insecure attachment patterns and PTSD, which, consequently, may impact their perceived parenting The Effects of Child Abuse and Exposure to Domestic Violence on Adolescent Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior Problems. By: Moylan, Carrie; Herrenkohl, Todd; Sousa, Cindy; Tajima, Emiko; Herrenkohl, Roy; Russo, M. Journal of Family Violence. Jan2010, Vol. 25 Issue 1, p53-63. 11p. 5 Charts. Abstract: This study examines the effects of child abuse and domestic violence exposure in childhood on adolescent internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Data for this analysis are from the Lehigh Longitudinal Study, a prospective study of 457 youth addressing outcomes of family violence and resilience in individuals and families. Results show that child abuse, domestic violence, and both in combination (i.e., dual exposure) increase a child’s risk for internalizing and externalizing outcomes in adolescence. When accounting for risk factors associated with additional stressors in the family and surrounding environment, only those children with dual exposure had an elevated risk of the tested outcomes compared to non-exposed youth. However, while there were some observable differences in the prediction of outcomes for children with dual exposure compared to those with single exposure (i.e., abuse only or exposure to domestic violence only), these difference were not statistically significant. Analyses showed that the effects of exposure for boys and girls are statistically comparable. IV. Health Impact BDNF Methylation and Maternal Brain Activity in a Violence-Related Sample. By: Moser, Dominik A.; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Stenz, Ludwig; Adouan, Wafae; Manini, Aurélia; Suardi, Francesca; Cordero, Maria I.; Vital, Marylene; Sancho Rossignol, Ana; Rusconi-Serpa, Sandra; Ansermet, François; Dayer, Alexandre G.; Schechter, Daniel S. PLoS ONE. 12/9/2015, Vol. 10 Issue 12, p1-13. 13p. Abstract: It is known that increased circulating glucocorticoids in the wake of excessive, chronic, repetitive stress increases anxiety and impairs Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) signaling. Recent studies of BDNF gene methylation in relation to maternal care have linked high BDNF methylation levels in the blood of adults to lower quality of received maternal care measured via self-report. Yet the specific mechanisms by which these phenomena occur remain to be established. The present study examines the link between methylation of the BDNF gene promoter region and patterns of neural activity that are associated with maternal response to stressful versus non-stressful child stimuli within a sample that includes mothers with interpersonal violence-related PTSD (IPV-PTSD). 46 mothers underwent fMRI. The contrast of neural activity when watching children—including their own—was then correlated to BDNF methylation. Consistent with the existing literature, the present study found that maternal BDNF methylation was associated with higher levels of maternal anxiety and greater childhood exposure to domestic violence. fMRI results showed a positive correlation of BDNF methylation with maternal brain activity in the anterior cingulate (ACC), and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), regions generally credited with a regulatory function toward brain areas that are generating emotions. Furthermore we found a negative correlation of BDNF methylation with the activity of the right hippocampus. Since our stimuli focus on stressful parenting conditions, these data suggest that the correlation between vmPFC/ACC activity and BDNF methylation may be linked to mothers who are at a disadvantage with respect to emotion regulation when facing stressful parenting situations. Overall, this study provides evidence that epigenetic signatures of stress-related genes can be linked to functional brain regions regulating parenting stress, thus advancing our understanding of mothers at risk for stress-related psychopathology. Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse: Current Research on Effects and Adjustment. By: Geffner, Robert. Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma. Jun2016, Vol. 9 Issue 2, p95-96. 2p. Abstract: The author reflects on effect of children exposure to domestic violence and abuse including neuropsychological impact, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and resilience development. V. Social Impact Being there for my grandchild - grandparents' responses to their grandchildren's exposure to domestic violence. By: Sandberg, Linn. Child & Family Social Work. May2016, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p136-145. 10p. Abstract: Grandparents whose grandchildren are exposed to domestic violence are faced with some unique challenges in their grandparenting, which have thus far been little discussed in research. This paper discusses the narratives of 10 Swedish grandparents whose grandchildren have been exposed to violence towards their mother. The aim was to explore grandparents' narrations of their responses in the face of violence, and their understanding of the role they play in their grandchildren's social networks. Two significant responses are discussed: ‘being there’ and ‘acknowledging the independence and self‐determination of the adult children’. Grandparents experienced these responses as contradictory and felt powerless when it came to their possibilities to protect their grandchildren. The paper suggests that grandparents could be a resource for domestic violence services, and social work practice needs to assess the roles of grandparents of children exposed to domestic violence. Social workers should consider the challenges these grandparents are facing and what support they may need in order to support their grandchildren INFLUENCE OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND PARENTING STYLE ON CHILDREN’S PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING. By: Umoren, Okon A.; Owiriwa, Ngozi C. Gender & Behaviour. Dec2018, Vol. 16 Issue 3, p1224612254. 9p. Abstract: The study investigated the influence of domestic violence and parenting style on psychological wellbeing of children. Four hundred and thirty-one (431) participants (two hundred and fifty females and one hundred and eighty-one males) were selected from four primary schools in Uyo metropolis using purposive sampling technique. Participants’ ages ranged between 8 and 13 years and the mean age was 10.36. Three instruments were used for data collection: Children’s Exposure to Domestic Violence Scale, Parental Authority Questionnaire, and the Ruff Psychological Well-Being Scale. A 2 x 3 factorial design was adopted for the study and data obtained were analyzed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Two hypothesis were tested in the study and the result of the first hypothesis showed a significant influence of domestic violence on children’s psychological wellbeing [F (1,226) = 10.2; P<. 05]. The result of the second hypothesis showed that there was no significant influence of parenting style on children’s psychological well-being [F (2,226) = 1.83; P>0.5]. The result further revealed that there was no interaction effect between domestic violence and parenting style in predicting children’s psychological well-being [F (2,226) = .45; P>.05). The findings of the study were discussed in line with existing literature. Parents were advised to seek counseling from qualified and competent counsellors on how to manage or resolve conflict so that it does not escalate into violence. VI. Emotional Impact Trauma Treatment in Young Children with Developmental Disabilities: Applications of the Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) Model to the Cases of "James" and "Juan". By: HARLEY, ELIZA K.; WILLIAMS, MARIAN E.; ZAMORA, IRINA; LAKATOS, PATRICIA P. PCSP: Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy. 2014, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p156-195. 40p. Abstract: This case study series investigates the application of the ChildParent Psychotherapy (CPP) model for young children with developmental disabilities who were exposed to trauma. Two Latino clients and their families were selected for systematic write-up: "James," 14 months old who, following medical trauma (surgery and stroke) showed global developmental delays; and "Juan," 6 years 2 months old with autism in the context of early exposure to domestic violence and a history of physical and emotional abuse. Utilizing the CPP model, we addressed the families' histories of traumatic events, including domestic violence, medical trauma, and attachment concerns associated with parental adjustment to diagnosis. The CPP model was selected with the goal of strengthening the relationship between each child and his caregivers; restoring the child's sense of safety, attachment, and appropriate affect; and improving the child's behavioral and social functioning. Clinical insights regarding the application of the CPP model for young children with developmental disabilities who were exposed to trauma are offered. In addition, cultural applications for Latino families are explored. Maternal Meta-Emotion Philosophy Moderates Effect of Maternal Symptomatology on Preschoolers Exposed to Domestic Violence. By: Cohodes, Emily; Chen, Stephen; Lieberman, Alicia. Journal of Child & Family Studies. Jul2017, Vol. 26 Issue 7, p1831-1843. 13p. 5 Charts, 3 Graphs. VII. Abstract: Exposure to domestic violence in the preschool years is consistently associated with children's heightened risk for developing behavior problems. Maternal meta-emotion philosophy (awareness, acceptance, and coaching of children's emotions) has been identified as an important protective factor in children's development of internalizing and externalizing behaviors following exposure to domestic violence. However, mothers who are victims of domestic violence often experience symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress, which may undermine their capacity to respond to their children's negative emotions. The present study examines the protective role of maternal meta-emotion philosophy among mothers and preschool-aged children exposed to domestic violence. Participants were 95 mothers (mean age = 31.78) and their preschool-aged children (mean age = 4.11) who had witnessed domestic violence involving their mothers. Multiple regression analyses, controlling for family socioeconomic status and child exposure to interpersonal violence in the family, indicated that maternal symptomatology was positively associated with children's internalizing problems. In addition, maternal awareness and coaching of children's negative emotions was found to moderate relations between maternal symptomatology and children's internalizing behaviors, and maternal awareness of children's negative emotions was found to moderate relations between maternal symptomatology and children's externalizing behaviors. These findings expand our understanding of maternal metaemotion philosophy as a protective factor for preschoolers who have witnessed domestic violence Conclusion ...
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Tutor went the extra mile to help me with this essay. Citations were a bit shaky but I appreciated how well he handled APA styles and how ok he was to change them even though I didnt specify. Got a B+ which is believable and acceptable.

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