Passion and Purpose Discussion

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Discussion 5:

  • A summary of the account, or accounts, from the course text, Passion and Purpose: Stories From the Best and Brightest Young Business Leaders, that resonated with you and an explanation of why those passages were meaningful to you.
  • Your analysis of how the individuals in the accounts you selected practiced leadership in business settings and what you have learned from reading that account. (Hint: For an exemplary response, explain how the account(s) you selected support, expand on, or contradict concepts we have explored in the course to date.)
  • Finally, compare the values, ethics, and goals of the leaders in the accounts you selected to your own. Explain how what you have learned from these readings will impact how you affect positive social change in a leadership role

i think Women in the Workplace would be a good choice.

NOTE: see attached

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m a n ag e m e n t (Continued from front flap) analyst for CNN, and former presidential adviser), Carter Roberts (President and CEO of World Wildlife Fund), Joe Kennedy (CEO and President of Pandora), and Rich Lyons (Dean of Haas Business School, University of California– Berkeley). Passion & Purpose offers profound insight into the values and vision of today’s emerging leaders, with inspiration and ideas for anyone who aspires to catalyze enduring change in the world. “Many baby boomers like to characterize the Facebook generation as entitled slackers. In reading the amazing stories of the leaders in Passion & Purpose, you quickly realize that nothing could be further from the truth. The reality is that this new generation of leaders is committed to making a difference and is ready to lead—not tomorrow, but now.” —B ill George, Professor of Management Practice, Harvard Business School; —Deb Henretta, Group President, Procter & Gamble Asia “The great challenge and the great opportunity we face today is the ability to work almost any time and any way. The new generation of leaders seems to embrace the opportunity side of this, approaching work more flexibly in terms of when and where it takes place.” —Joe Kennedy , CEO and President, Pandora “Leadership is not being the CEO; leadership is influencing outcomes. Leadership is often without formal authority. I think that for a lot of these younger folks, they demonstrate the skills of leadership, but they also embody a new mind-set.” —Rich Lyons, Dean of Haas Business School, University of California–Berkeley “The next generation of leaders will have the opportunity to shape the world. They will deal with exciting and quite different challenges than their predecessors—all in the context of a globally connected and rapidly changing world.” —Dominic Barton, Global Managing Director, McKinsey & Company PASSION PURPOSE john coleman daniel gulati w. oliver segovia foreword by bill george jac k e t d e s i g n : ja m e s d e v r i e s au t h o r p h otos : w e s l e y c h a n n e l , t r acy p ow e l l , PASSION PURPOSE “The younger generation has an integrated identity that is consistent between workplace, home, and society . . . they not only want to make a difference themselves, they want to know that the company they work for is also making a positive contribution.” ISBN 978-1-4221-6266-8 9 0000 pat r i c k a n d pat r i c i a s e g o v i a www.hbr.org/books 9 7 81 42 2 1 62 668 How will the next generation of leaders shape business? F —Carter Roberts, President and CEO, World Wildlife Fund senior political analyst, CNN; and former presidential adviser Get inspired. Stay informed. Join the discussion. Visit www.hbr.org/books Stories from the Best and Brightest Young Business Leaders “It doesn’t matter where you begin your career. What matters most is developing the ability to connect the dots . . . the rarest and most valuable commodity in our work is those individuals who can bridge government, business, civil society, and academia in solving the biggest problems facing our society.” —David Gergen, Director, Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School; To learn more, visit: www.hbr.org/passion-purpose U S $ 2 5.9 5 author, True North “With America—and the world—at a major inflection point, strong and principled leadership is as crucial as it’s ever been. As this book shows, the younger generation is stepping up more and more each day to provide that leadership—in ways all of us should be paying attention to.” John Coleman earned an MBA from Harvard Business School, where he was a Dean’s Award winner, and an MPA from the Harvard Kennedy School, where he was a Zuckerman Fellow and a George Fellow. Daniel Gulati holds an MBA from Harvard Business School, where he was a Baker Fellow and an Arthur Rock Entrepreneurial Fellow, and was awarded the Robert F. Jasse Distinguished Award in Entrepreneurship & Leadership. W. Oliver Segovia was born and raised in the Philippines and received an MBA with Distinction from Harvard Business School, where he was a LeBaron-McArthur-Ellis Fellow. coleman gulati segovia h a r v a r d busi n e ss r e vi e w p r e ss rom questions about globalization and sustainability to issues surrounding diversity, learning, and the convergence of the public and private sectors, tomorrow’s leaders have a lot to think about. But these big issues aren’t the only ones facing young leaders starting out in business today. What else are they focused on? And how do they prioritize the challenges and opportunities before them— while also making the world a better place? In Passion & Purpose, recent Harvard Business School MBAs share personal stories about assuming the mantle of leadership in ways unlike any previous generation. In candid, often moving accounts of their successes and setbacks—from launching start-ups or taking on the family business to helping kids in the Arabian Gulf or harnessing new technology to develop clean energy—they reveal how their generation’s ideas, aspirations, and practices are radically reshaping business and transforming leadership. Drawing on insights from a survey of five hundred students from top U.S. business schools, Passion & Purpose provides an overview of today’s big hot-button issues, followed by firsthand accounts from the young leaders who are tackling these issues headon. Their personal stories are rounded out with broader perspectives from established luminaries in business, academia, and the public sector, including Dominic Barton (Global Managing Director of McKinsey & Company), Deb Henretta (Group President of Procter & Gamble Asia), Nitin Nohria (Dean of Harvard Business School), David Gergen (Director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School, senior political (Continued on back flap) This document is authorized for use only by Sherrye Marshall in MMSL-6000-1/WMBA-6000B-1/WMBA-6000-1/MGMT-6000-1-Dynamic Leadership2019 Spring Sem 01/7-04/28-PT2 at Laureate Education - Walden University, 2019. Coleman10343_Mechanical.indd 1 9/26/11 5:03 PM 107124 00 i-xiv r2 vs 9/19/11 8:11 PM Page i PASSION PURPOSE This document is authorized for use only by Sherrye Marshall in MMSL-6000-1/WMBA-6000B-1/WMBA-6000-1/MGMT-6000-1-Dynamic Leadership2019 Spring Sem 01/7-04/28-PT2 at Laureate Education - Walden University, 2019. 107124 00 i-xiv r2 vs 9/19/11 8:11 PM Page ii This document is authorized for use only by Sherrye Marshall in MMSL-6000-1/WMBA-6000B-1/WMBA-6000-1/MGMT-6000-1-Dynamic Leadership2019 Spring Sem 01/7-04/28-PT2 at Laureate Education - Walden University, 2019. 107124 00 i-xiv r2 vs 9/19/11 8:11 PM Page iii Stories from the Best and Brightest Young Business Leaders PASSION PURPOSE JOHN COLEMAN DANIEL GULATI W. OLIVER SEGOVIA HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW PRESS Boston, Massachusetts This document is authorized for use only by Sherrye Marshall in MMSL-6000-1/WMBA-6000B-1/WMBA-6000-1/MGMT-6000-1-Dynamic Leadership2019 Spring Sem 01/7-04/28-PT2 at Laureate Education - Walden University, 2019. Find more digital content or join the discussion on www.hbr.org. The web addresses referenced and linked in this book were live and correct at the time of the book’s publication but may be subject to change. Copyright 2012 Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation All rights reserved No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in, or introduced into a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), without the prior permission of the publisher. Requests for permission should be directed to permissions@hbsp.harvard.edu, or mailed to Permissions, Harvard Business School Publishing, 60 Harvard Way, Boston, Massachusetts 02163. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Coleman, John, 1981Passion & purpose : stories from the best and brightest young business leaders / John Coleman, Daniel Gulati, W. Oliver Segovia. p. cm. ISBN 978-1-4221-6266-8 (alk. paper) 1. Leadership. 2. Executives. 3. Success in business. 4. Organizational effectiveness. I. Gulati, Daniel. II. Segovia, W. Oliver. III. Title. IV. Title: Passion and purpose. HD57.7.C644 2012 658'.049--dc23 2011025148 Contents Foreword, Bill George Introduction ix 1 1. Convergence 11 Creating Opportunities Across Sectors Floating Above the Boxes 17 Business, Nonprofit, and the Age of Falling Boundaries UMAIMAH MENDHRO Learning from Kibera 23 Nonprofit Lessons for Business from East Africa’s Largest Slum RYE BARCOTT Commerce and Culture 28 Combining Business and the Arts CHRISTINA WALLACE Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Business of Peace 34 JAKE CUSACK Business in the World 41 How Corporations Can Be Change Agents KELLI WOLF MOLES Interview with David Gergen, adviser to four presidents, 47 Director of Harvard’s Center for Public Leadership, and senior political analyst for CNN 2. Globalization 55 Embracing the Global Generation Bridging Two Worlds An India Story SANYOGITA AGGARWAL 61 vi Contents QatarDebate 67 Education, Civic Engagement, and Leadership in the Arabian Gulf ANDREW GOODMAN Emerging Social Enterprise 74 Learning the Business of Agriculture in Tanzania KATIE LAIDLAW Global Citizen Year 79 Learning from the World ABIGAIL FALIK The Business of Reconciliation 85 How Cows and Co-Ops Are Paving the Way for Genuine Reconciliation in Rwanda CHRIS MALONEY Interview with Dominic Barton, Global Managing Director 91 of McKinsey & Company 3. People 99 Leading in a Diverse World Nonconforming Culture 104 How to Feel Comfortable in Who You Are No Matter Where You Are KIMBERLY CARTER Diversity Day 110 Whole People, Whole Organizations, and a Whole New Approach to Diversity JOSH BRONSTEIN Women and the Workplace 118 TASNEEM DOHADWALA Joyful on the Job 124 A Generation Pursuing Happiness at Work BENJAMIN SCHUMACHER People Leadership from Baghdad to Boston 130 SETH MOULTON Interview with Deb Henretta, CEO, P&G Asia 134 Contents 4. Sustainability vii 139 Integrating Preservation and Profits A Sustainable Career 145 ANNIE FISHMAN From Safety Nets to Trampolines 151 VALERIE BOCKSTETTE The Value of Community Partnerships in 158 Addressing Climate Change CHARLEY CUMMINGS Interview with Carter Roberts, CEO, World Wildlife Fund 5. Technology 164 171 Competing by Connecting Building an Online Marketplace 175 JAMES REINHART Technology and Social Good 181 Loans, Relays and the Power of Community SHELBY CLARK Mobile Millennials 185 JASON GURWIN Interview with Joe Kennedy, 191 CEO and President of Pandora 6. Learning 197 Educating Tomorrow’s Leaders The Leadership Boot Camp 203 Training the Next Generation of Corporate Leaders KISHAN MADAMALA The MBA of Hard Knocks 210 Why Fast Failure Is the Best Thing for Business Education PATRICK CHUN The New Corporate Classrooms Training’s Tectonic Technological Shift MICHAEL B. HORN 216 viii Contents Tackling Financial Illiteracy 223 ALEXA LEIGH MARIE VON TOBEL The Education of a Millennial Leader 228 JONATHAN DOOCHIN Interview with Rich Lyons, Dean, Haas Business School, 235 University of California–Berkeley Moving Forward 243 Capstone Interview with HBS Dean, Nitin Nohria 246 Appendix: About the Passion and Purpose MBA Student Survey 255 Notes 263 Acknowledgments 273 Index 275 About the Contributors 289 About the Authors 295 107124 00 i-xiv r2 vs 9/19/11 8:11 PM Page ix Foreword Many baby boomers like to characterize the Facebook generation as entitled slackers. In reading the amazing stories of the leaders in Passion and Purpose, you quickly realize that nothing could be further from the truth. The reality is that this new generation of leaders is committed to making a difference and is ready to lead—not tomorrow, but now. The authors of this remarkable collection of twenty-six stories, all written by exceptional young leaders, were deeply impacted by the leadership failures of 2008 that led to the Great Recession. The three authors conclude, “We have faith in the young generations of leaders who have witnessed the lessons of the crisis and are now seeking to learn from the mistakes that were made and offer a new vision for the future.” Georgian John Coleman believes that “business offers solutions to some of the most pressing problems we face.” Filipino Oliver Segovia quotes the local saying, “He who doesn’t appreciate his roots shall never succeed.” Australian Daniel Gulati saw firsthand examples of how organizations can meet their financial goals and simultaneously make positive contributions to society. Unwilling to wait their turn in line, these leaders are already having enormous impact. Look at the global citizens being developed by Abby Falik, the transformation of leadership that Jon Doochin is leading at Harvard College, Marine Captain Rye Barcott’s initiative to help the slums of Kenya’s Kibera become a safe community that works for This document is authorized for use only by Sherrye Marshall in MMSL-6000-1/WMBA-6000B-1/WMBA-6000-1/MGMT-6000-1-Dynamic Leadership2019 Spring Sem 01/7-04/28-PT2 at Laureate Education - Walden University, 2019. 107124 00 i-xiv r2 vs x 9/19/11 8:11 PM Page x PASSION AND PURPOSE everyone, and Katie Laidlaw’s efforts to make agriculture in Tanzania profitable for all. Theirs are just a few of the initiatives that vividly illustrate how this generation of leaders really is different from mine. Anthropologist Margaret Mead once said, “Never doubt the power of a small group of people to change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” Through their initiatives, young leaders are confirming Mead’s wisdom. My generation started out just as idealistically as these young leaders. We were kids of the Kennedy era who flocked to Washington, D.C., Selma, and Watts to try to change the world. Somewhere along the way we lost sight of that idealism. Was it the futility of the Vietnam war and the assassinations of the Kennedy brothers and Martin Luther King, Jr., or were we seduced by flawed economic theories into believing that selfinterest should take precedence over the common good? Whatever the answers, the leadership failures of the last decade—from the fall of Enron through the economic meltdown of 2008—have vividly demonstrated the flaws in twentieth-century leadership and the need for a new generation of leaders to take charge. The response of this new generation, as these stories vividly illustrate, is to use their talents now to make a positive impact in helping others. As a professor of management practice at Harvard Business School the past eight years, I have had the privilege of working closely with several of these leaders and many more like them. After completing my tenure as CEO of Medtronic in 2001 and board chair in 2002, I took a working sabbatical in Switzerland to teach at two leading Swiss institutions. It was there that I decided to devote myself for the next decade to helping develop the next generation of leaders, from MBA students to the new generation of corporate CEOs. In early 2004 I returned to my alma mater, Harvard Business School, to help launch a new course, Leadership and Corporate Accountability, and later created Authentic Leadership Development, a course based on leading from within and built around six-person Leadership Development Groups. During these years I have spent hundreds of hours in the classroom and many more in private discussions with students in my office. This document is authorized for use only by Sherrye Marshall in MMSL-6000-1/WMBA-6000B-1/WMBA-6000-1/MGMT-6000-1-Dynamic Leadership2019 Spring Sem 01/7-04/28-PT2 at Laureate Education - Walden University, 2019. 107124 00 i-xiv r2 vs 9/19/11 8:11 PM Page xi Foreword xi Through these open, thoughtful, often poignant talks, I have learned just how committed these young leaders are about using their talents to have an impact. They are willing to work countless hours to realize their dreams, yet they also want to lead integrated lives. I have seen them follow their hearts to unite people around common causes, and the impact has often been stunning. Their approach to leadership differs sharply from that of the baby boomer generation. Command-and-control is out. So is exerting power over others. They eschew bureaucracy, hierarchical organizations, and internal politics. That’s why many are opting to start their own organizations rather than joining established institutions. The focus of their leadership is to build on their roots and align people around a common purpose and shared values. They recognize that they cannot accomplish their goals by using power to control others, as so many in my generation did. Instead, they amplify their limited power by empowering others to take on shared challenges. Their leadership style is collaborative, not autocratic. Nor are they competitive with their peers. They seek to surround themselves with the most talented people representing a wide range of skills that can be helpful in achieving their aims. They care little who gets the credit, so long as their mutual goals are achieved. Most of all, these young leaders seek to serve, using their gifts and their leadership abilities. One of the characteristics of this new generation of leaders is their ability to move easily between the for-profit, nonprofit, and government sectors. In fact, that’s because many of them have worked in all three sectors. They have firsthand knowledge of how people in each of these sectors think, how they measure success, and how they get things done. A number of the contributors to this book have joint master’s degrees in government and business, with a substantial dose of social enterprise courses and projects. This broad perspective is increasingly important because developing workable solutions to the world’s intractable problems—global health, energy and the environment, education, poverty and jobs, and global peace—requires multisector approaches. For example, take the challenges This document is authorized for use only by Sherrye Marshall in MMSL-6000-1/WMBA-6000B-1/WMBA-6000-1/MGMT-6000-1-Dynamic Leadership2019 Spring Sem 01/7-04/28-PT2 at Laureate Education - Walden University, 2019. 107124 00 i-xiv r2 vs xii 9/19/11 8:11 PM Page xii PASSION AND PURPOSE of AIDS in Africa. It isn’t sufficient for pharmaceutical makers like GlaxoSmithKline to give their AIDS drugs away. It takes support from local governments to get the drugs to the people who need them most, NGOs like Doctors Without Borders to administer the drugs to HIV patients, and funds from global organizations like the World Health Organization and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. These emerging leaders, with the diversity of experiences they have accumulated before the age of thirty, understand how to bring people together from these organizations and get them to collaborate to solve major problems. That’s what former Marine Captain Rye Barcott is doing to address the problem of poverty in Kibera, Nairobi’s largest slum. While still a student at the University of North Carolina, Barcott formed Carolina for Kibera, investing $26 and combining it with the sweat equity of nurse Tabitha Festo and a local youth named Salim Mohamed. Incredibly, he was able to build this new organization while serving for five years as a counterintelligence officer in Bosnia, Iraq, and the Horn of Africa. Barcott sees similarities between the tactics he used in building the Kibera community and the Marines’ task in community building in wartorn towns like Fallujah, Iraq. He writes, “I feel fortunate to have been able to work across the public, private, and nonprofit sector ...
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