ENG350 SIU Tensile Test Lab Report & Stress Vs. Strain Worksheet

Anonymous

Question Description

I have All the data, I need you to make the Lab report according to the rubric.

THIS IS AN EMAIL SENT BY THE PROFESSOR

>>>>

"The attached lab reports are from some of my previous courses during my undergrad years, there are a few sections that I do not have included in the lab reports but given both of them you should get an idea of what is expected with given info and the layout of the lab report that you are currently working on. As I told all the lab sections, here is the link to the youtube video of the experiment, as I stated I really like this video and think that it is very detailed in its explanation of what is going on.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8U4G5kcpcM&t=325s"

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Brass Lo (in) 2 Lf (in) Do (in) Df (in) Area (in ) 2 2.53 0.505 0.38 0.2003 Load(lbf) 0 100 900 1000 1250 1500 1750 2000 2250 2500 2750 3000 3250 3500 3750 4000 4250 4500 4750 5000 5250 5500 5750 6000 6250 6500 6750 7000 7500 7250 7750 8000 8250 8500 8750 9000 9250 9500 9750 10000 Deflection (in) 0.0000 0.0059 0.0103 0.0108 0.0122 0.0133 0.0146 0.0162 0.0171 0.0182 0.0193 0.0206 0.0223 0.0227 0.0239 0.0250 0.0261 0.0273 0.0284 0.0294 0.0308 0.0318 0.0323 0.0345 0.0361 0.0372 0.0386 0.0396 0.0431 0.0414 0.0447 0.0463 0.0463 0.0504 0.0527 0.0560 0.0590 0.0659 0.0787 0.1000 Stress (psi) 0 499.260678 4493.3461 4992.60678 6240.75848 7488.91017 8737.06187 9985.21357 11233.3653 12481.517 13729.6687 14977.8203 16225.972 17474.1237 18722.2754 19970.4271 21218.5788 22466.7305 23714.8822 24963.0339 26211.1856 27459.3373 28707.489 29955.6407 31203.7924 32451.9441 33700.0958 34948.2475 37444.5509 36196.3992 38692.7026 39940.8543 41189.006 42437.1577 43685.3093 44933.461 46181.6127 47429.7644 48677.9161 49926.0678 Strain (in/in) 0 0.00295 0.00515 0.0054 0.0061 0.00665 0.0073 0.0081 0.00855 0.0091 0.00965 0.0103 0.01115 0.01135 0.01195 0.0125 0.01305 0.01365 0.0142 0.0147 0.0154 0.0159 0.01615 0.01725 0.01805 0.0186 0.0193 0.0198 0.02155 0.0207 0.02235 0.02315 0.02315 0.0252 0.02635 0.028 0.0295 0.03295 0.03935 0.05 10250 10500 10750 11000 11200 11000 10500 10250 0.1267 0.1678 0.2324 0.2900 0.4300 0.5500 0.6100 0.6483 51174.2195 52422.3712 53670.5229 54918.6746 55917.196 54918.6746 52422.3712 51174.2195 0.06335 0.0839 0.1162 0.145 0.215 0.275 0.305 0.32415 Aluminum Lo (in) 2 Lf (in) Do (in) Df (in) Area (in ) 2.05 2.416 0.505 0.32 0.2003 Load(lbf) 0 250 500 750 1000 1250 1500 1750 2000 2250 2500 2750 3000 3250 3500 3750 4000 4250 4500 4750 5000 5250 5500 5750 6000 6250 6500 6750 7000 7500 7250 7750 8000 8250 8500 8670 7500 7000 6400 Deflection (in) 0.0000 0.0030 0.0047 0.0063 0.0077 0.0090 0.0104 0.0117 0.0130 0.0144 0.0157 0.0170 0.0182 0.0196 0.0208 0.0221 0.0234 0.0247 0.0259 0.0272 0.0285 0.0298 0.0311 0.0323 0.0335 0.0348 0.0361 0.0374 0.0388 0.0401 0.0417 0.0447 0.0555 0.0955 0.1488 0.2550 0.3780 0.4610 0.5010 Stress (psi) 0 1248 2496 3744 4993 6241 7489 8737 9985 11233 12482 13730 14978 16226 17474 18722 19970 21219 22467 23715 24963 26211 27459 28707 29956 31204 32452 33700 34948 37445 36196 38693 39941 41189 42437 43286 37445 34948 31953 Strain (in/in) 0.0000 0.0015 0.0023 0.0031 0.0038 0.0044 0.0051 0.0057 0.0063 0.0070 0.0077 0.0083 0.0089 0.0096 0.0101 0.0108 0.0114 0.0120 0.0126 0.0133 0.0139 0.0145 0.0152 0.0158 0.0163 0.0170 0.0176 0.0182 0.0189 0.0196 0.0203 0.0218 0.0271 0.0466 0.0726 0.1244 0.1844 0.2249 0.2444 Steel Lo (in) Lf (in) Do (in) Df (in) Area (in ) 2.00 2.76 0.505 0.295 0.2003 Load(lbf) 0 250 500 750 1000 1250 1500 1750 2000 2250 2500 2750 3000 3250 3500 3750 4000 4250 4500 4750 5000 5250 5500 5750 6000 6250 6500 6750 7000 7500 7250 7750 8000 8250 8500 8750 9000 9250 9500 9800 Deflection (in) 0.0000 0.0021 0.0037 0.0051 0.0062 0.0072 0.0081 0.0091 0.0100 0.0109 0.0118 0.0127 0.0136 0.0145 0.0154 0.0163 0.0171 0.0180 0.0188 0.0197 0.0206 0.0215 0.0223 0.0231 0.0239 0.0247 0.0256 0.0264 0.0272 0.0280 0.0288 0.0296 0.0305 0.0313 0.0321 0.0329 0.0337 0.0345 0.0415 0.0450 Stress (psi) 0 1248 2496 3744 4993 6241 7489 8737 9985 11233 12482 13730 14978 16226 17474 18722 19970 21219 22467 23715 24963 26211 27459 28707 29956 31204 32452 33700 34948 37445 36196 38693 39941 41189 42437 43685 44933 46182 47430 48928 Strain (in/in) 0.0000 0.0011 0.0019 0.0026 0.0031 0.0036 0.0041 0.0046 0.0050 0.0055 0.0059 0.0064 0.0068 0.0073 0.0077 0.0082 0.0086 0.0090 0.0094 0.0099 0.0103 0.0108 0.0112 0.0116 0.0120 0.0124 0.0128 0.0132 0.0136 0.0140 0.0144 0.0148 0.0153 0.0157 0.0161 0.0165 0.0169 0.0173 0.0208 0.0225 2 10000 10250 10500 10750 11000 11250 11500 11750 12000 12250 12500 12750 13000 13250 13500 13750 14000 14250 14325 12500 11000 0.0907 0.0956 0.1018 0.1090 0.1175 0.1265 0.1365 0.1478 0.1604 0.1735 0.1879 0.2032 0.2258 0.2490 0.2758 0.3130 0.3780 0.5580 0.571 0.6300 0.6500 49926 51174 52422 53671 54919 56167 57415 58663 59911 61159 62408 63656 64904 66152 67400 68648 69896 71145 71519 62408 54919 0.0454 0.0478 0.0509 0.0545 0.0588 0.0633 0.0683 0.0739 0.0802 0.0868 0.0940 0.1016 0.1129 0.1245 0.1379 0.1565 0.1890 0.2790 0.2855 0.3150 0.3250 ENGR 350 A-001: Tentative Lab Schedule Description Assign Date Tension Lab 1/22/2019 Compression Lab 2/12/2019 Buckling Lab 2/26/2019 Torsion Lab 3/19/2019 Shear and Moment Lab 4/2/2019 Lab Final 4/16/2019 Due Date 2/12/2019 2/26/2019 3/19/2019 4/2/2019 4/16/2019 4/16/2019 ENGR 350 A/B-002: Tentative Lab Schedule Description Assign Date Tension Lab 1/22/2019 Compression Lab 2/12/2019 Buckling Lab 2/26/2019 Torsion Lab 3/19/2019 Shear and Moment Lab 4/2/2019 Lab Final 4/16/2019 Due Date 2/12/2019 2/26/2019 3/19/2019 4/2/2019 4/16/2019 4/16/2019 ENGR 350 A/B-003: Tentative Lab Schedule Description Assign Date Tension Lab 1/23/2019 Compression Lab 2/13/2019 Buckling Lab 2/26/2019 Torsion Lab 3/19/2019 Shear and Moment Lab 4/3/2019 Lab Final 4/17/2019 Due Date 2/13/2019 2/26/2019 3/19/2019 4/3/2019 4/17/2019 4/17/2019 ENGR 350 A/B-004: Tentative Lab Schedule Description Assign Date Tension Lab 1/24/2019 Compression Lab 2/14/2019 Buckling Lab 2/27/2019 Torsion Lab 3/20/2019 Shear and Moment Lab 4/4/2019 Lab Final 4/18/2019 Due Date 2/14/2019 2/27/2019 3/20/2019 4/4/2019 4/18/2019 4/18/2019 Rectilinear Dynamic System Control ME 407 Measurements & Controls Lab 8 Lab Conducted By: Sulaiman Alareefi David McKavanagh Cameron Bowes Maxwell Hopkins Lab Report Written By: David McKavanagh Due By: 12/2/2016 1|Page Table of Contents Section Page Title Page 1 Table of Contents 2 Procedure 3 Results 3 ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Analysis 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 9 Conclusions 2|Page Procedure First the system must be set up properly, with the four 500g masses on the first carriage, no springs or dampers connected to it, and the other carriages secured out of range of the first carriage’s path. Set Ts at 0.00442, the step size of 0, duration set to 3000 ms, and repetition of 1. Once these amounts have been entered the PID controller needs to be set up with the value found, and then execute the program, when the program is finished the data is exported for use later. The process is repeated with the derivative gain, critically damped, overdamped, and the integral gain. Results Figure 1: Proportional Gain 3|Page Figure 2: Doubled Proportional Gain Figure 3: Derivative Gain 4|Page Figure 4: Five Times Derivative Gain Figure 5: Underdamped 5|Page Figure 6: Critically Damped Figure 7: Overdamped 6|Page Figure 8: Integral Gain Figure 9: Integral Gain Doubled 7|Page Figure 10: Integral Gain Halved Figure 11: Integral Adjusted 8|Page Analysis Through this experiment the carts mass and the mass upon it is unchanged. It was possible to find out the natural frequency for each of the trial with the data that was graphed. From the four figures above it was possible to find To, Xo, Tn, Xn, and n for each of the segments of the lab. τd=(τnτo)/n, then uses τd for ωd=(2π)/τd then δ=(1/n)ln(Xo/Xn), from there the value d would be used to find ζ which is ζ=(1/(1+(2π/δ)2)1/2), with ζ we can find the ωn which is ωn=(ωd/(1-ζ2)1/2). The values that were obtained from Figure 1, Proportional Gain To=0.522, Xo=2071, Tn=1.372, Xn=396, and n being 1. Using the formals Wn = 7.64. Also calculating the derivational gain, kd=50 N/(m/s)/khw, giving us a kd of 0.0043, ki=750 N/(m/s)/khw, giving us a ki value of 0.0645. These values are the derivative gain and the integral gain respectively. Conclusion Though this experiment was interesting, the values for the integral gain seem to have been calculated wrong, as the values needed to be changed to 0.02 to get the correct graph as seen in the adjusted integral gain graph. Though there also seemed to be a small point in the cart where it would get hung up and stall as it was moving. These two problems seem to have kept us from achieving the correct outcome of this experiment. 9|Page Southern Illinois University Carbondale Department of Engineering Bernoulli’s Equation Lab # 2 Fluid Mechanics ENGR 370A Written By: David McKavanagh Submitted to: Ganesh Ghimire Completed on: Wednesday July 8th 2015 Submitted on: Thursday July 9th 2015 1|Page Table of Contents A. List of Figures 2 B. Objectives 3 C. Theory 3 D. Apparatus 5 E. Procedure 5 F. Results 6 G. Conclusion 8 H. Appendix 10 I. Figure 1: Venturi Nozzle 5 II. Table 1 6 III. Table 2 6 IV. Table 3 7 V. Table 4 7 2|Page Objectives It is to show the validity of the Bernoulli equation by gathering data from different points along a horizontal duct. Gathering the pressure heads and the velocity heads along said duct. Theory This experiment focuses on gathering data from points along a horizontal duct called a Venturi Nozzle. There are multiple forces acting on the flow of fluids through the horizontal duct. Those forces are: Static Pressure Head, Stagnation Pressure Head, the Velocity Head, and the Total Energy Head. The Summation of Forces ∑ 𝐹 = 𝑚𝑎𝑠 𝑠 Where the ∑F is the summation of the forces acting on the fluid traveling through the Bernoulli Apparatus. The Bernoulli Equation 𝑝1 𝑉12 + + 𝑧1 = 𝐶𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑡 = 𝐻 𝛾 2𝑔 Where p is the pressure, ᵞ is the specific weight of the fluid, V is the velocity, g is the force of gravity, and z is the elevation of the fluid. This equation is frequently expressed as: 𝑝1 𝑉12 𝑝2 𝑉22 + 𝑧1 + = + 𝑧2 + 𝛾 2𝑔 𝛾 2𝑔 Since there is no elevation component 3|Page 𝑝1 𝑉12 𝑝2 𝑉22 + = + 𝛾 2𝑔 𝛾 2𝑔 To find the Flow Rate 𝑄= ∀ 𝑡 Where Q is the volumetric flow rate of the fluid, ∀ is the volume in cubic meters, and t is the time measured in seconds Finding the cross section of the flow area, 𝐴= 𝜋 2 𝐷 4 Where A is the area, and D is the diameter of the Venturi Nozzle. These are the important equations that are used to find the figures needed in the Bernoulli Equation. 4|Page Apparatus: Venturi Nozzle At least six manometers Bernoulli Apparatus At least twelve liters of fluid Figure 1: Venturi Nozzle Procedure: The measurements of the diameter, the distance from a fixed point (called point A), and the Volume target that must be reached for time where given by the instructor. Firstly activate the entire system and begin running water through the system to clear the air out of all of the manometers. Once all of the air is removed from the system start your timer, adjust the device until there is a steady flow and record the amount of fluid within the manometers. After ten liters of fluid has flowed through the venturi nozzle stop the timer and record the amount of time that has elapsed. After recording the figures for the static pressure heads and the stagnation pressure head (which would be 5|Page the last of the manometers on the device, adjust the flow rate of the fluid to the second rate that is to be used in the experiment. Once that flow rate is achieved start the timer once again, and record the static pressure heads and the stagnation pressure head on the manometers. Stop the timer once the ten liter amount is reached. Results Table 1: First Flow Rate Volume, L 1.00E+01 Test Section Time, t (s) Volume m^3 3.57E+02 Diameter, d, (mm) Flow rate, Q (m^3/s) 1.00E-02 Distance from Test Section A (mm) 2.80E-05 Static Pressure Head Stagnation Pressure (mm) Head (mm) A 2.50E+01 0.00E+00 9.50E+01 9.60E+01 B 1.39E+01 6.03E+01 9.40E+01 9.60E+01 C 1.18E+01 6.87E+01 9.00E+01 9.60E+01 D 1.07E+01 7.26E+01 8.90E+01 9.60E+01 E 1.00E+01 8.11E+01 8.60E+01 9.60E+01 Cross Section of Flow Area, A Velocity, V Velocity (m^2) (m/s) Head (m) Total Energy Head (m) Table 2: Calculations for First Flow Rate Distance from Static Diameter, Test Section Pressure d (m) A (m) Head (m) Stagnation Pressure Head (m) 2.50E-02 0.00E+00 9.50E-02 9.60E-02 4.91E-04 0.00E+00 0.00E+00 9.69E-06 1.39E-02 6.03E-02 9.40E-02 9.60E-02 1.52E-04 1.69E-04 1.45E-09 9.59E-06 1.18E-02 6.87E-02 9.00E-02 9.60E-02 1.09E-04 5.94E-05 1.798E-10 9.18E-06 1.07E-02 7.26E-02 8.90E-02 9.60E-02 8.99E-05 5.32E-05 1.44E-10 9.08E-06 1.00E-02 8.11E-02 9.60E-02 9.60E-02 7.85E-05 4.26E-05 9.25E-11 8.78E-06 6|Page Table 3: Second Flow Rate Volume, L 1.00E+01 Test Section Time, t (s) Volume m^3 1.12E+02 Diameter, d, (mm) Flow rate, Q (m^3/s) 1.00E-02 8.90E-05 Distance from Test Section A (mm) Static Pressure Head Stagnation Pressure (mm) Head (mm) A 2.50E+01 0.00E+00 2.70E+02 2.73E+02 B 1.39E+01 6.03E+01 2.50E+02 2.73E+02 C 1.18E+01 6.87E+01 2.34E+02 2.73E+02 D 1.07E+01 7.26E+01 2.30E+02 2.73E+02 E 1.00E+01 8.11E+01 1.85E+02 2.73E+02 Cross Section of Flow Area, A Velocity, V Velocity (m^2) (m/s) Head (m) Total Energy Head (m) Table 4: Calculations for the Second Flow Rate Distance from Static Diameter, Test Section Pressure d (m) A (m) Head (m) Stagnation Pressure Head (m) 2.50E-02 0.00E+00 2.70E-01 2.73E-01 4.91E-04 0.00E+00 0.00E+00 2.76E-05 1.39E-02 6.03E-02 2.50E-01 2.73E-01 1.52E-04 2.46E-04 3.08E-09 2.55E-05 1.18E-02 6.87E-02 2.34E-01 2.73E-01 1.09E-04 1.89E-04 1.82E-09 2.39E-05 1.07E-02 7.26E-02 2.30E-01 2.73E-01 8.99E-05 1.70E-04 1.47E-09 2.35E-05 1.00E-02 8.11E-02 1.85E-01 2.73E-01 7.85E-05 1.36E-04 9.43E-10 1.89E-05 The values presented in tables 1 and 3 were partially given by the instructor, those being the diameter, the volume, and the distance from test section A. The values entered into the table, being static pressure head, stagnation pressure head, and time where found during the experiment. The values in tables 2 and 4 where calculated using the formula given in the Theory section. 7|Page Discussion Accuracy and Precision: The topic of accuracy and precision is probably the most important aspect of experimentation, this is true, especially within this experiment. Within the general populous the terms are interchangeable, while with in the scientific community they couldn’t be farther from one another. Accuracy refers to the ability to record a measured variable close to the known value of a substance. Precision refers to the ability to record two or more measurements close to each other. To ensure a proper experiment, accuracy and precision is what is needed. The first results that need to be checked for accuracy and precision would be calculations from millimeters to meter for the first four columns in the second and fourth tables. Those would be diameter, distance from test section A, the Static Pressure Head and the Stagnation Pressure Head. The second result that needs to be checked would be to ensure that the correct equations are used to calculate the flow rate, the cross section of flow area, velocity, velocity head and the total energy head for both flow rate tables. Probable Sources of Error The main source of error that would present its self in these experiments would be human error, if not all of the air was removed from the manometers, or that if the person recording the numbers from the manometers, watching the time, or watching for the mark of the volume. 8|Page Conclusion The initial objective was met, the experiment definitely show the validity of Bernoulli Equation. The students gained the knowledge of how to read a Bernoulli Apparatus correctly and with the proper procedures. A recommendation for a future of the experiment would be to have a better timer, or a bigger Bernoulli Apparatus that would be easier to read, to negate the human error. Ensuring that all equations needed for the experiment would also be a step to reduce the error. 9|Page Appendix References Cited Nicklow, John, PHD. "Engineering Fluid Mechanics -Laboratory Manual." Fluids. Southern Illinoi University, # Nov. 2010. Web. 24 June 2014. 10 | P a g e Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner Scanned with CamScanner ...
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JesseCraig
School: New York University

Attached.

Running head: TENSILE TEST LAB REPORT

TENSILE TEST LAB REPORT
Name:
Institution affiliation:
Date:

1

TENSILE TEST LAB REPORT

2
Contents

Objectives and scope....................................................................................................................... 3
Description ...................................................................................................................................... 3
Equipment and specimens............................................................................................................... 3
Procedure ........................................................................................................................................ 4
Results ............................................................................................................................................. 5
Discussion and conclusion .............................................................................................................. 8
References ..................................................................................................................................... 10

TENSILE TEST LAB REPORT

3
Objectives and scope

Objectives
The main purpose of this experiment is to determine the mechanical properties of brass,
aluminum, and steel, i.e., how these material behave when loading is subjected. The main
interest is to determine the maximum load that these materials can withstand.
Scope
The determination of the mechanical properties of construction materials such as steel,
aluminum, and brass is very important to structural engineers whose main interest is to ensure
public safety. To prevent structural failure, studying the plastic behavior of the metals under
loading is very vital. Conducting a tensile test enables the engineers and engineering students to
determine mechanical properties of these materials particularly the ultimate strength (σ ult), yield
point (σ y), and elastic modulus (E). This enhances the design and construction of safe structures
that can serve the public efficiently as per the design life.

Description
The strength properties of the test materials (steel, brass, and aluminum) is tested using
the universal test machine. The process starts with the preparation of the tester followed by
placing of the test piece. The extensometer is then switched into working position, and the
testing machine started. The material's behavior is observed by recording the data of the applied
force and extension until failure (fracture occurs).

Equipment and specimens


Universal Testing Machine

TENSILE TEST LAB REPORT


Control computer



Plain-carbon steel



Brass rod



Aluminum rod

4
...

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