National Response Framework

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Question Description

I have 4 of my classmates posts. I need you to response to each of them separately. Also, one source for each of them. Don't write about how good their posts or how bad. All you need to do is to choose one point of the post and explore it a little bit with one source support for each response. In the attached you will find all the classmates post.

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# Question 1 :

Discuss NRF Core Capability and Critical Tasks 1 and 2.  Why are these important to an Emergency Manager? What would be your ‘target capability’ be for these Critical Tasks for the first 8 hours, 24 hours, and 72 hours in your community for an event destroying the local hospital and electrical grid? 

 

Reading Assignment:

Sylves chapters 4 (review), 6

National Response Framework: - https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/117791

PPD 8

http://www.dhs.gov/presidential-policy-directive-8-national-preparedness

This is simply the cover page of the document above.

Make sure that you click on each (+)  to open all expanded issues within the PPD.  You will also see an underlined statement at the top that opens more expanded information.

PPD 8 Overview

https://www.fema.gov/learn-about-presidential-policy-directive-8


FOCUS POINTS

Yes, these are both big documents, but the Sylves chapters make them manageable.  Start with those chapters, then open the NRF files and skim through.   I have posted an overview of PPD 8 which "boils down" that document even more than the Sylves chapter.  Don't get bogged down in the immensity and verbiage of both documents. Keep them in your personal library for future reference.


Student 1 post :

The National Response Framework is a guide to how the Nation responds to all types of disasters and emergencies. National Response Framework describes the principles, roles, and responsibilities, and coordinating structures for delivering the core capabilities required to respond to an incident and further describes how response efforts integrate with those of the other mission areas.


Moreover, the Response mission area focuses on ensuring that the Nation is able to respond effectively to all types of incidents that range from those that are adequately handled with local assets to those of catastrophic proportion that require marshaling the capabilities of the entire Nation. For example,  the objectives emergency manager of the Response mission area define the capabilities necessary to save lives, protect property and the environment, meet basic human needs, stabilize the incident, restore basic services and community functionality, and establish a safe and secure environment to facilitate the integration of recovery activities.


Three response core capabilities: Planning, Public Information and Warning, and operational coordination, these common core capabilities are essential to the success The National Response Framework, They help establish unity of effort among all those involved in the Response mission area. So my first target in the first 8 hours is planning, the planning makes it possible to manage the life cycle of a potential crisis, determine capability requirements and arrangements to perform specific missions and tasks. After 24 hours I must provide accurate and accessible information to decision makers and the public. This includes the development of accessible message content. In 72 hours For an incident response, I must occur both among those tasked to deliver the various response core capabilities and with those delivering the core capabilities of other mission areas. 

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# Question 1 : Discuss NRF Core Capability and Critical Tasks 1 and 2. Why are these important to an Emergency Manager? What would be your ‘target capability’ be for these Critical Tasks for the first 8 hours, 24 hours, and 72 hours in your community for an event destroying the local hospital and electrical grid? Reading Assignment: Sylves chapters 4 (review), 6 National Response Framework: - https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/117791 PPD 8 http://www.dhs.gov/presidential-policy-directive-8-national-preparedness This is simply the cover page of the document above. Make sure that you click on each (+) to open all expanded issues within the PPD. You will also see an underlined statement at the top that opens more expanded information. PPD 8 Overview https://www.fema.gov/learn-about-presidential-policy-directive-8 FOCUS POINTS Yes, these are both big documents, but the Sylves chapters make them manageable. Start with those chapters, then open the NRF files and skim through. I have posted an overview of PPD 8 which "boils down" that document even more than the Sylves chapter. Don't get bogged down in the immensity and verbiage of both documents. Keep them in your personal library for future reference. Student 1 post : The National Response Framework is a guide to how the Nation responds to all types of disasters and emergencies. National Response Framework describes the principles, roles, and responsibilities, and coordinating structures for delivering the core capabilities required to respond to an incident and further describes how response efforts integrate with those of the other mission areas. Moreover, the Response mission area focuses on ensuring that the Nation is able to respond effectively to all types of incidents that range from those that are adequately handled with local assets to those of catastrophic proportion that require marshaling the capabilities of the entire Nation. For example, the objectives emergency manager of the Response mission area define the capabilities necessary to save lives, protect property and the environment, meet basic human needs, stabilize the incident, restore basic services and community functionality, and establish a safe and secure environment to facilitate the integration of recovery activities. Three response core capabilities: Planning, Public Information and Warning, and operational coordination, these common core capabilities are essential to the success The National Response Framework, They help establish unity of effort among all those involved in the Response mission area. So my first target in the first 8 hours is planning, the planning makes it possible to manage the life cycle of a potential crisis, determine capability requirements and arrangements to perform specific missions and tasks. After 24 hours I must provide accurate and accessible information to decision makers and the public. This includes the development of accessible message content. In 72 hours For an incident response, I must occur both among those tasked to deliver the various response core capabilities and with those delivering the core capabilities of other mission areas. References Stevens, K. (2013). National response framework https://www.fema.gov/core-capabilities Student 2 post : The National Response Framework (NRF) depend on scalable, flexible, and adaptable coordinating structures to align key roles and responsibilities across the Nation, connecting all levels of government, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector. NRF consists of 15 core capabilities which serve as a guide to how the nation react to all types of disasters. The importance of NRF lies in its agreement to have common standard command and management structures. This will allow collaboration of the whole community and will ensure having the same mission. Therefore, as an emergency manager, you should assess the readiness of response operations of local agencies and work with local agencies on developing common plans. Planning is the first response core capabilities in the national preparedness goal .the first Objective of Planning is to establish a systematic process that engaging community as appropriate in the development of strategies that meet our goals and objectives. Second core capabilities the Public Information and Warning For a valid response, we have to provide adequate information to the public and decisionmakers and also must be accurate and accessible. The report must be included incident facts, health risk, recommendations, evacuation plan, and guidance. In the first 24 hours, your duty as emergency manager to coordinate with nearby hospitals, cities if needed for further coordination. Also, you are responsible to bring up to date changes to the public as required, and consider coordinating with other agencies if necessary. Before the first 72 hours, EM should work on a long-term plan to finish response and initiate recovery. The process of communication will continue to ensure the evacuation is completed and see the places that need supplies such as food and shelter. Reference National Response Framework Third Edition June 2016. Retrieved https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/14660146829829bcf8245ba4c60c120aa915abe74e15d/National_Response_Framework3rd.pdf Target Capabilities List A companion to the National Preparedness Guidelines U.S. Department of Homeland Security September 2007 retrieved https://www.fema.gov/pdf/government/training/tcl.pdf Question 2 : Is being Joint Commission compliant enough to be able to prepare, respond and recover from a disaster? Explain your answer. Review the JC Lessons Learned. What lesson learned resonated with you? Why? Readings: Joint Commission Lessons Learned ( found in the attached file) Review the following websites: https://www.jointcommission.org/emergency_management.aspx Student 3 post: Being Joint Commission complaint is enough to be able to prepare, respond and recover from a disaster. This is because one is able to follow all the guidelines that it provides and identify the best way to behave when an emergency has occurred. Natural and man-made disasters have been occurring each day and people who are not compliant with the commission end up losing lives and property. Also, being compliant has made sure that all hospitals are in line with the increasing complexities in the health care management systems. There has been a reduction in hazard vulnerability as one ends up being well conversant with the kind of steps to make. In fact, community helps in preparation when an emergency occurs and the response that one makes will determine the kind of utilities and resources that are needed in that aspect. At the same time, the personnel who are taking part in the safety management programs are monitored. This means that safety and security are guaranteed after complying with the Joint Commission Emergency Management. References Joint Commission Emergency Management Standards. Retrieved from https://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/6/Emergency_Management_Upda te_Presentation.pdf Reilly, M., & Markenson, D. S. (2010). Health care emergency management: Principles and practice. New York, NY: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Van Krieken, T., Kulatunga, U., & Pathirage, C. (2017). Importance of community participation in disaster recovery. The University of Salford Manchester. Retrieved from http://usir.salford.ac.uk/43859/1/ID%20086%20from%2013th%20IPGRC% 202017%20Full%20Conference%20Proceedings.pdf Student 4 post : I think the Joint Commission is compliant enough to prepare, respond and recover from a disaster, it has four key principles for an effective emergency management plan which are: • • • • Mitigation - Make plans ahead of time to lessen the severity and impact of an emergency. Preparation - Build needed organizational capacities, including supplies and equipment, agreements with vendors, staff orientation and training, planning processes, and organization- wide drills. Response - Define actions staff would take when confronted by an emergency, such as reporting to prearranged locations. Plan for a warning and notification process, priority-setting and liaison with other organizations. Recovery - Take steps to restore essential services and resume normal operations - plan for staff support and community response. By implementing these four principles, any organization will be prepared for any disaster, both man-made and natural. All listed lessons are helpful and resonated, and should be considered in case of disasters. Reviewing EOP annually is the most important lesson for me. The Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) provides the structure and processes that the organization utilizes to respond to and initially recover from an event. The EOP is therefore the response and recovery component of the EMP. It is important to be reviewed annually to find out if there is anything to be improved because EOP describes how a facility will respond to and recover from all hazards. It is inclusive of the six critical elements within the Joint Commission's Emergency Management Standards. References: Roberts, J. S., Coale, J. G., & Redman, R. R. (1987). A history of the joint commission on accreditation of hospitals.Jama, 258(7), 936-940. Image source: www.ucdenver.edu Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 1 © Copyright, The Joint Commission Emergency Management Debrief Lessons Learned Planning & Leadership Emergency Program Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 2 © Copyright, The Joint Commission EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CHAPTER OUTLINE  Foundation for the Emergency Operations Plan [EM.01.01.01]  The Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) General Requirements [EM.02.01.01]  Specific Requirements  Six Critical Areas [EM.02.02.01-EM.02.02.11]  Disaster Volunteers [EM.02.02.13-EM.02.02.15]  Evaluation Evaluating the planning activities [EM.03.01.01]  Evaluating the Emergency Operations Plan through exercises [EM.03.03.03]  Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 3 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  1. Communication [EM.02.02.01] 2. Resources & Assets [EM.02.02.03] 3. Safety & Security [EM.02.02.05] 4. Staff responsibilities [EM.02.02.07] 5. Utilities Management [EM.02.02.09] 6. Patient, clinical & support activities [EM.02.02.11] Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 4 © Copyright, The Joint Commission SIX CRITICAL AREAS 2016 Emergency Management Update Team The Joint Commission © Copyright, The Joint Commission WHAT HAS THE JOINT COMMISSION BEEN UP TO? EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT TEAM  Cross-divisional team  Review of large-scale events  Improvement  Field and surveyor education  Survey process and standards Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 6 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Debriefs  Lessons learned  Education and process improvement DEBRIEFS WITH HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS  Hurricane Sandy  West Texas Fertilizer Explosion  West Virginia Water Contamination  Boston Marathon Bombing  Ebola Outbreak  Baltimore Civil Unrest  San Bernardino Terrorist Event  Ferguson Civil Unrest Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 7 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  South Carolina Flooding LESSONS LEARNED – PLANNING/PREPAREDNESS  Establish relationships w/law enforcement & back-up security agencies  Joint education, drills, etc.  Activate ICS early in incident to support situational awareness  Plan / drill for escalating events  Mass shooting plus bomb threat. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 8 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Communication. LESSONS LEARNED – PLANNING/PREPAREDNESS  Identify & reach out to staff living in hot  e.g., laundry service  Know actual usage of utilities on ‘normal’ day, in evening, on weekends. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 9 © Copyright, The Joint Commission zones during unrest to identify support needs in advance.  Consider supply chain and alternate service providers during water contamination. LESSONS LEARNED – PLANNING/PREPAREDNESS  Plan for most emerging infectious diseases rather than new ‘outbreak of the week’ plan.  IC plan, surge plan, all hazards plan, decon plan, pan-flu plan  Don’t overlook common risks that could go on the HVA in community or region  CBRNE: Fertilizer storage facilities throughout the region that could pose risk of combustion/explosion. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 10 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Risks LESSONS LEARNED – PLANNING/PREPAREDNESS  Planning for civil unrest focused primarily on:  Communications (with staff, patients, community incident command, the public/media)  Security  Transit (to the facility for patients and staff) Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 11 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Reviewing EOP annually  Policies addressing utility disruption, including approach to clinical interventions  Water LESSONS LEARNED – PLANNING/PREPAREDNESS  Don’t overlook home care, outpatient services and other ancillary providers home care providers were held back from entering certain communities where there were clients with chronic conditions - care arrangements can be addressed proactively. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 12 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  During unrest LESSONS LEARNED – GENERAL RESPONSE hospital & campus to identify flood issues early.  Divert spontaneous volunteers (even clinical) from ED to avoid congestion during trauma response.  Community-based & mobile services (e.g., addiction services) need to choose their locations during unrest to preserve safety of staff/patients. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 13 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Conduct frequent tours (every 2 hours) of LESSONS LEARNED - COMMUNICATIONS command/control, staff, patients/families, media & the public.  Don’t presume that all staff have smart phones or use social media; use redundant methods of staff communication.  Manage staff stress and access to misinformation via proactive staff communication strategy. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 14 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Have separate lines of communication for LESSONS LEARNED - COMMUNICATIONS with cell phone during response and recovery.  Proactive media/social media outreach plan mitigates intrusions from reporters that consume leaders’ time during response.  Regular joint calls with local providers, city & state support situational awareness during unrest. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 15 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Carry extra batteries and/or chargers along  During unrest:  Monitor social media used/sponsored by protest groups to anticipate crowd movement and potential impact on transit or emergency/urgent care.  Reinforce with staff - verbally and in written messaging/scripts used as needed in patient/family interactions - values of diversity and role to care for all people to help mitigate safety concerns or racial tension impacting community. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 16 © Copyright, The Joint Commission LESSONS LEARNED - COMMUNICATIONS LESSONS LEARNED - SECURITY  Definition of ‘lock-down’ with response partners  Security forces have one meaning, hospitals may vary  Civil unrest response from small community hospital & secured it’s perimeter - closed all off-site locations  Security to central site  Moved vehicles  Removed from public access items that could be removed/damaged Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 17 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Reduced LESSONS LEARNED - SECURITY  Reinforced with staff use of de-escalation techniques during civil unrest.  Train/exercise with local law enforcement  During terrorist shooting over 40 officers were onsite in minutes Conducted bomb search and provided essential support. No need to arm hospital security.  Separate ED waiting area for injured police officers & their families during unrest Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 18 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  LESSONS LEARNED - STAFF  Senior leadership  Prioritize time and resources for staff training Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 19 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Weather/natural disasters  Prepare for staff rotations & shift relief  Designated sleeping areas, adequate meals  Shuttle system to/from homes LESSONS LEARNED - STAFF  Monitor local/county/state agencies  Road closures, curfews, etc. that impact staff movement to & from work community conditions change  Place Critical Incident Stress management staff in EOC  Provide real-time support & guidance to chain of command during unrest Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 20 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Adjust shifts, allow sheltering in place as LESSONS LEARNED – PATIENT CARE  Flooding  Review IC plan to assess patient risk for HAI. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 21 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Water contamination  Home health & DME partners proactively monitor at-risk patients  Facilitate patient education on O2 concentrators, CPAP machines, & water sourcing. LESSONS LEARNED - EXERCISES  Stress & test system, staff, leaders with escalating complications & patients with different functional needs.  Train & practice staff in active shooter response with in-house security & law enforcement. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 22 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Joint exercise LESSONS LEARNED – LEADERSHIP  Leaders met frequent w/staff to discuss quality of care and safety during flood response/recovery.  Leaders facilitated visible presence of security in and around building during unrest  Increased sense of security. managerial assistance; identified & addressed staff morale/support needs in process after terrorist attack. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 23 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Leaders rounded & provided hands-on LESSONS LEARNED – PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT/COPING  Reinforced w/staff & community role of hospital as safe zone for all injured. Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 24 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Civil unrest/recovery  Town hall meetings for information & support and to dispel myths/rumors  Made available EAP & pastoral care  Routed routine monthly prayer walk through vulnerable community.  During unrest response & recovery  Invited staff discussion (individual or small group) on racial tension  Sense of safety at home in impacted community  Need for safety tips or security/transit support (alter work hours, shelter at hospital, etc.). Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 25 © Copyright, The Joint Commission LESSONS LEARNED – PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT/COPING LESSONS LEARNED – INFECTIOUS DISEASE  Plan, train, & exercise for infectious disease emergencies:  initial screening of PPE, including don and dof  safe patient flow (entry point to isolation)  iterative training of care teams  dedicated equipment  safe transfer of patients  disposal & transport of waste Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 26 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  use LESSONS LEARNED - UTILITIES  Water  Processes for cleaning water systems after loss of water  Supply for systems management  Potable vs. non-potable • Equipment use, i.e. sterile processing • Human consumption Emergency Management Update Team 2016- 27 © Copyright, The Joint Commission  Fuel  Increase run time through load-shedding LESSONS LEARNED – HEALTH CARE PARTNERS  Water contamination:  Ambulatory dialysis company deployed water tanker truck to supply hospital  Dialys ...
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Joelda
School: New York University

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Running Head: STUDENT RESPONSE

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Student Response 1
National Response Framework is as the core in managing the disasters in a national level.
Indeed it is responsible for providing the guidelines for coordination, planning, delegating out
roles and responsibilities. There was a need for the creation of a single entity in charge of
managing all the disasters nationwide in order to ensure that the correct finances, efforts, and
accountability are accorded to each and every disaster that occurs within the nation. This
framework has therefore given specific duties and responsibilities to each involved party to
ensure that responses to these disasters are punctual and effective. This response and
management of disasters, in the long run, will be able to save lives ...

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