Revolutionary Women paper

Anonymous
timer Asked: Feb 15th, 2019
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Question Description

Guidelines

• Papers
o Length: 1400-1500 words (not including footnotes/bibliography): list the word count on pg. 1
o Format: 1-inch margins, double (or 1.5) spaced, 12-point font
o Citations: Footnotes in Chicago Style (http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html)

• Posters
o Posters are used in many academic fields for the presentation of research and are especially effective at

combining evidence (charts, illustrations) with text. They should be well designed visually with a clear title, not cluttered, and incorporate both text and visual evidence. Text should be concise (and not too small), and illustrations should be identified with small captions (i.e. titles/dates) and explicitly contextualized and explained within the poster. You should have the following components: background information; abstract (a concise paragraph explaining the main point/argument of the poster); and several sections explaining the evidence (cartoons, posters, photos, documents, etc.)

o PosterSize:nosmallerthan18x24butpreferablylarger
o MaybecreatedonaPowerPointslideandprintedoutprofessionallyorputtogethertheold-fashioned

way on a piece of card (i.e. print out the various pieces and use a glue stick).o For online submission: take a photo, convert it to PDF, and submit the PDF

page1image30472page1image30632page1image30792page1image30952page1image31112

• Bibliography/Works Cited Page (not included in word count): please list everything you consulted (supplying URLs for websites). For posters attach it to the back.

Academic Resources and Policy on Wikipedia

There are plenty of secondary and primary sources posted on Canvas, and I encourage you to consult optional readings when you want additional information. Other online resources should come from reputable sites (journals, universities, libraries) and not from such sites as Wikipedia. To be sure, Wikipedia does have some positive features. Many of its articles are perfectly fine for an introduction to a topic – particularly less disputed topics – and sources are often listed at the bottom of the page. However, they are NOT appropriate to research in history. Many historical topics are too contentious and too complex – this is especially true for almost anything relating to the history of radicalism. In addition, historians have particular standards of historical research: there are simply many errors of fact, argument, and interpretation in Wikipedia articles. Should you need additional resources for this paper, use the books and articles already assigned (or listed under “optional”) as well as academic encyclopedias (you must be at UCI or via the VPN):

• From the Library Homepage: search “Gale Virtual Reference Library.” Once you are in, then click onHistory (at side menu); scroll down to find the relevant volumes for this paper and course (including Europe 1789-1914, Encyclopedia of Russian History, Encyclopedia of Irish History, Encyclopedia of European Social History, Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa, and the Encyclopedia of Western Colonialism), and click on it. The encyclopedias are generally organized alphabetically by topic. Many topics are cross-listed, and additional resources (books, articles) are often cited.

• For additional examples of visual materials on the Suffragettes:http://www.sylviapankhurst.com/her_campaigns/sylvia_&_suffrage/the_suffrage_movement.php#

http://www.sylviapankhurst.com/her_campaigns/sylvi...

  • For copies of Votes for Women: https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=IMJZBBnUFLg...
  • For information and guides to Academic Posters, just google “effective academic posters” or “academic postershumanities.” There are loads of guides, mostly for STEM subjects, but you can still learn a lot from the general guidance for things like layout. I’ve listed a few examples but keep in mind that your poster may be smaller than many of these and read while held in the hand (so you may use smaller font).
page2image21872

https://www.depts.ttu.edu/tlpdc/Resources/Teaching...

ferencePapersAndPostersInTheHumanities.php

https://urc.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk3561/f... Make_an_Effective_Poster2.pdf

https://guides.nyu.edu/posters

page2image24464page2image24624page2image24784

Expectations and Grades

A good paper has a strong argument (thesis) clearly articulated in the introduction and an analytic structure (with each paragraph having a clear topic sentence (a main point) and supporting evidence (examples, quotations). All papers must use both primary and secondary sources, and particular credit will be given when (1) a paper successfully integrates the argument of a secondary source (and not just information from it) and (2) when primary sources are analyzed as evidence. I grade for content (argument, use of evidence, integration of primary/secondary sources), writing/structure, and accuracy.

Creative written prompts are graded for how well they demonstrate an accurate and nuanced understanding of the primary documents and secondary studies we have read in class, the historical context, and an ability to situate the creative work into it. Historical plausibility and accuracy are both important as are technical issues (spelling, format).

Posters are graded for content, accuracy, and presentation: they should be carefully designed to communicate your main points. They should likewise demonstrate knowledge of both the primary and secondary sources used in class.

PLEASE DON’T HESITATE TO ASK IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS!

GOOD LUCK!

Revolutionary Women: Paper 2 (Due Tuesday February 26 in class and online) Prompts: Choose ONE of the following prompts 1. Should the suffragettes be described as “revolutionaries”? In your essay, make a clear argument for or against the use of this term but be sure to take into account reasons on both sides. 2. What were the negative public representations of the suffragettes, and how did the suffragettes attempt to counter them? In your essay, analyze the interplay between negative and positive representations. How did they both tap into gender stereotypes? 3. “The suffragettes both challenged and reinforced gender norms.” Do you agree? Write an analytic essay in which you critically assess this statement and develop your own argument on this topic. a. OR: Answer this question with regard to Irish revolutionary women. 4. How important were the motifs of self-sacrifice and martyrdom in the suffragette movement? 5. Analyze how the film, Suffragette (2015), presents a historical argument about the character of the suffragette movement and the motives of some of its participants. In your essay, integrate some of the broader debate over the film: on what basis were the criticisms made with regard to both the historical context and the choices made by the film makers? Do you consider them valid? Why or why not? 6. POSTER PROJECT: make an attractive and informative academic poster that addresses one of the following themes. (See below for guidelines) a. How did the suffragettes use media and branding to define their movement? b. Analyze negative and positive representations of the suffragettes. Why were they important? c. What were the reasons for militancy and the dynamics of its radicalization? d. Explain the history and significance of hunger strikes and forced feedings. e. Another topic of your own choice: this must be cleared with me by Tuesday February 19. 7. CREATIVE: You are a suffragette: create a plausible background for yourself and briefly sketch the outlines of your biography: write a personal narrative explaining how and why you became a suffragette and your subsequent choices within the movement (for example, either for or against militancy and/or hunger strikes). a. If you are especially adventurous, you may put together several primary documents for your suffragette modelled upon those in the National Archives. You must discuss this option with me in advance, and I must approve your plans. Guidelines • • Papers o o o Posters o o o o Length: 1400-1500 words (not including footnotes/bibliography): list the word count on pg. 1 Format: 1-inch margins, double (or 1.5) spaced, 12-point font Citations: Footnotes in Chicago Style (http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html) Posters are used in many academic fields for the presentation of research and are especially effective at combining evidence (charts, illustrations) with text. They should be well designed visually with a clear title, not cluttered, and incorporate both text and visual evidence. Text should be concise (and not too small), and illustrations should be identified with small captions (i.e. titles/dates) and explicitly contextualized and explained within the poster. You should have the following components: background information; abstract (a concise paragraph explaining the main point/argument of the poster); and several sections explaining the evidence (cartoons, posters, photos, documents, etc.) Poster Size: no smaller than 18x24 but preferably larger May be created on a PowerPoint slide and printed out professionally or put together the old-fashioned way on a piece of card (i.e. print out the various pieces and use a glue stick). For online submission: take a photo, convert it to PDF, and submit the PDF • Bibliography/Works Cited Page (not included in word count): please list everything you consulted (supplying URLs for websites). For posters attach it to the back. Academic Resources and Policy on Wikipedia There are plenty of secondary and primary sources posted on Canvas, and I encourage you to consult optional readings when you want additional information. Other online resources should come from reputable sites (journals, universities, libraries) and not from such sites as Wikipedia. To be sure, Wikipedia does have some positive features. Many of its articles are perfectly fine for an introduction to a topic – particularly less disputed topics – and sources are often listed at the bottom of the page. However, they are NOT appropriate to research in history. Many historical topics are too contentious and too complex – this is especially true for almost anything relating to the history of radicalism. In addition, historians have particular standards of historical research: there are simply many errors of fact, argument, and interpretation in Wikipedia articles. Should you need additional resources for this paper, use the books and articles already assigned (or listed under “optional”) as well as academic encyclopedias (you must be at UCI or via the VPN): • From the Library Homepage: search “Gale Virtual Reference Library.” Once you are in, then click on History (at side menu); scroll down to find the relevant volumes for this paper and course (including Europe 1789-1914, Encyclopedia of Russian History, Encyclopedia of Irish History, Encyclopedia of European Social History, Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa, and the Encyclopedia of Western Colonialism), and click on it. The encyclopedias are generally organized alphabetically by topic. Many topics are cross-listed, and additional resources (books, articles) are often cited. • For additional examples of visual materials on the Suffragettes: http://www.sylviapankhurst.com/her_campaigns/sylvia_&_suffrage/the_suffrage_movement.php# http://www.sylviapankhurst.com/her_campaigns/sylvia_&_suffrage/perceptions_of_women.php • For copies of Votes for Women: https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=IMJZBBnUFLgC • For information and guides to Academic Posters, just google “effective academic posters” or “academic posters humanities.” There are loads of guides, mostly for STEM subjects, but you can still learn a lot from the general guidance for things like layout. I’ve listed a few examples but keep in mind that your poster may be smaller than many of these and read while held in the hand (so you may use smaller font). • https://www.depts.ttu.edu/tlpdc/Resources/Teaching_resources/TLPDC_teaching_resources/PresentingCon ferencePapersAndPostersInTheHumanities.php • • https://urc.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk3561/files/local_resources/documents/pdf_documents/How_To_ Make_an_Effective_Poster2.pdf https://guides.nyu.edu/posters Expectations and Grades A good paper has a strong argument (thesis) clearly articulated in the introduction and an analytic structure (with each paragraph having a clear topic sentence (a main point) and supporting evidence (examples, quotations). All papers must use both primary and secondary sources, and particular credit will be given when (1) a paper successfully integrates the argument of a secondary source (and not just information from it) and (2) when primary sources are analyzed as evidence. I grade for content (argument, use of evidence, integration of primary/secondary sources), writing/structure, and accuracy. Creative written prompts are graded for how well they demonstrate an accurate and nuanced understanding of the primary documents and secondary studies we have read in class, the historical context, and an ability to situate the creative work into it. Historical plausibility and accuracy are both important as are technical issues (spelling, format). Posters are graded for content, accuracy, and presentation: they should be carefully designed to communicate your main points. They should likewise demonstrate knowledge of both the primary and secondary sources used in class. PLEASE DON’T HESITATE TO ASK IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS! GOOD LUCK!

Tutor Answer

Kevins_Jr
School: Rice University

Attached.

REVOLUTIONARY WOMEN

Your name
Instructor
Course
Date

(1409 words

Surname 2

Suffragettes were members of women organization who demanded the right to vote for
women and participate in public elections. They were led by Millicent Fawcett, Emmeline
Pankhurst, and her daughters Sylvia and Christabel. Revolutionaries are the people in the society
who aim at bringing a significant impact in the restructuring of the political, economic and social
systems within society. The revolutionaries may be violent or peaceful when ailing their
grievances. The suffragettes can also be termed as revolutionaries. Their practices in demanding
for votes for women consider them as revolutionaries. They carried out demonstrations where
some were arrested, and others were killed, but they remained focused on their demands.1 This
paper shall argue why suffragettes, are described as revolutionaries.
Suffragettes can be described as revolutionaries since they founded a union known as
Women Social and Political Union. Emmeline Pankhurst and her two daughters known as
Christabel and Sylvia led the union. The union was to unite the members to present their
grievances in one voice.2 Most revolutionaries in the world had to form an organization for
bringing members together. The organization strengthened the members, and they were able to
demand their rights as a union without fear. Even though the union did not come to an agreement
to some of the practices such as using violence the union played a significant role in the
revolution.
Suffragettes can be described as revolutionaries since they carried out demonstrations of
violence when demanding the rights for women to vote. The violence demonstrations started

1 .Nisha Mukherjee Bellinger, "Voting And Human Rights In Democratic Societies", Human Rights
Review 18, no. 3 (2017): 263-282, doi:10.1007/s12142-017-0451-9.

2 .G. W. E. R., "Suffragettes", Notes And Queries 10-, no. 261 (1908): 518-518, doi:10.1093/nq/s10x.261.518d.

Surname 3

when there was an interruption by Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenney in a meeting which
was held by Winston Churchill and Edward grey where they demanded a response from the two
li...

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Review

Anonymous
Tutor went the extra mile to help me with this essay. Citations were a bit shaky but I appreciated how well he handled APA styles and how ok he was to change them even though I didnt specify. Got a B+ which is believable and acceptable.

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