MATH221 UDEL Week 6 Lab Statistics For Decision Making

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Week 6 Lab

Week 6 Lab

CriteriaRatingsPts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeQuestions 1 - 5

40.0 pts

Full Marks

32.0 pts

4 Questions

24.0 pts

3 Questions

16.0 pts

2 Questions

8.0 pts

1 Question

0.0 pts

No Marks

40.0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeQuestion 6

16.0 pts

Full Marks

0.0 pts

No Marks

16.0 pts

This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeQuestion 7

24.0 pts

Full Marks

0.0 pts

No Marks

24.0 pts

Total Points: 80.0


Drive (miles) 36 20 88 6 71 42 76 63 36 63 38 28 55 33 40 80 86 83 4 39 25 25 54 54 81 73 29 76 78 77 42 36 71 94 6 Mean Stdev State MI IL CA IL MI IL NY PA TX NY OR NY OH SC IL NV FL FL NY SC CA GA FL CA CA FL TX PA CA PA TX OR PA KY OR Mean (Coin) Stdev (Coin) Shoe Size 10 5 6 12 8 8 9 10 7 11 10 7 9 11 10 12 11 13 9 11 8 9 9 5 10 12 9 11 9 10 9 9 7 11 13 4.400 1.499 Height (inches) 61 62 63 63 64 65 65 66 66 67 67 67 67 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 73 73 74 74 75 Sleep (hours) 7 7 5 7 6 8 7 8 5 8 8 4 8 8 6 8 8 8 7 10 6 7 8 5 8 7 7 4 9 8 7 7 8 8 10 Gender M F F F F F F F M M F F F M M M M M F M F M F F F F M M M M F M M M M Car blue black black blue blue red red silver orange green silver black dark blue blue green white black blue blue red silver silver green green black green silver silver blue blue black blue black red silver TV (hours)Money (dollars) 3 5.00 3 10.00 3 43.00 2 44.00 2 1.00 4 4.00 3 7.00 3 5.00 3 6.00 3 4.00 2 15.00 1 29.00 4 31.00 1 9.00 5 16.00 4 3.00 3 6.00 3 8.00 5 21.00 3 26.00 4 34.00 3 53.00 2 5.00 6 6.00 2 7.00 4 15.00 2 32.00 5 13.00 2 47.00 1 52.00 3 7.00 5 23.00 4 6.00 3 20.00 6 7.00 Coin 7 2 6 2 4 4 6 7 3 6 4 4 4 4 5 4 3 3 5 4 4 5 3 7 7 3 3 5 2 5 3 5 7 4 4 Die1 4 3 5 6 4 3 2 4 5 4 2 3 1 3 4 5 3 4 5 4 3 4 5 6 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 5 4 Die2 1 1 2 1 4 3 5 6 5 4 3 4 3 2 2 1 4 3 6 5 4 6 3 4 3 2 1 4 5 6 4 3 2 3 4 Die3 6 4 5 3 4 3 4 5 2 3 1 2 3 3 2 4 6 5 4 5 3 2 1 4 5 4 3 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 3 Die4 Die5 6 2 5 3 3 5 2 1 5 6 4 3 6 4 2 4 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 6 6 1 1 2 2 2 1 5 Die6 4 3 5 2 1 6 1 2 6 3 3 6 4 3 1 2 2 2 5 6 6 1 3 4 4 2 5 2 5 3 2 2 4 5 1 2 3 5 6 5 4 5 2 4 4 6 3 4 1 2 4 1 1 2 6 6 2 3 2 1 5 2 4 4 2 1 2 1 1 1 Die7 Die8 2 5 2 4 6 2 2 5 2 5 6 3 2 6 3 4 1 5 2 2 2 2 5 5 6 1 3 4 3 2 6 1 2 3 6 Die9 5 2 1 2 5 3 4 1 1 6 5 3 1 6 2 4 3 3 4 5 5 2 5 1 6 1 4 2 1 2 1 4 4 2 6 Die10 4 4 3 5 2 6 1 3 4 1 1 1 1 2 3 1 3 5 5 3 5 6 2 1 4 5 3 5 1 6 5 5 1 5 1 4 2 5 3 2 1 2 5 2 5 3 3 5 3 6 4 2 6 1 4 1 2 6 6 6 4 2 4 4 3 2 1 6 1 4 P(x≥1) P(x>1) P(4
Drive (miles) 36 20 88 6 71 42 76 63 36 63 38 28 55 33 40 80 86 83 4 39 25 25 54 54 81 73 29 76 78 77 42 36 71 94 6 State MI IL CA IL MI IL NY PA TX NY OR NY OH SC IL NV FL FL NY SC CA GA FL CA CA FL TX PA CA PA TX OR PA KY OR Shoe Size 10 5 6 12 8 8 9 10 7 11 10 7 9 11 10 12 11 13 9 11 8 9 9 5 10 12 9 11 9 10 9 9 7 11 13 Height (inches) 61 62 63 63 64 65 65 66 66 67 67 67 67 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 73 73 74 74 75 Sleep (hours) 7 7 5 7 6 8 7 8 5 8 8 4 8 8 6 8 8 8 7 10 6 7 8 5 8 7 7 4 9 8 7 7 8 8 10 Gender M F F F F F F F M M F F F M M M M M F M F M F F F F M M M M F M M M M Car blue black black blue blue red red silver orange green silver black dark blue blue green white black blue blue red silver silver green green black green silver silver blue blue black blue black red silver TV (hours)Money (dollars) 3 5,00 3 10,00 3 43,00 2 44,00 2 1,00 4 4,00 3 7,00 3 5,00 3 6,00 3 4,00 2 15,00 1 29,00 4 31,00 1 9,00 5 16,00 4 3,00 3 6,00 3 8,00 5 21,00 3 26,00 4 34,00 3 53,00 2 5,00 6 6,00 2 7,00 4 15,00 2 32,00 5 13,00 2 47,00 1 52,00 3 7,00 5 23,00 4 6,00 3 20,00 6 7,00 Coin 7 2 6 2 4 4 6 7 3 6 4 4 4 4 5 4 3 3 5 4 4 5 3 7 7 3 3 5 2 5 3 5 7 4 4 Die1 4 3 5 6 4 3 2 4 5 4 2 3 1 3 4 5 3 4 5 4 3 4 5 6 4 3 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 5 4 Die2 1 1 2 1 4 3 5 6 5 4 3 4 3 2 2 1 4 3 6 5 4 6 3 4 3 2 1 4 5 6 4 3 2 3 4 Die3 6 4 5 3 4 3 4 5 2 3 1 2 3 3 2 4 6 5 4 5 3 2 1 4 5 4 3 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 3 Die4 Die5 6 2 5 3 3 5 2 1 5 6 4 3 6 4 2 4 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 6 6 1 1 2 2 2 1 5 Die6 4 3 5 2 1 6 1 2 6 3 3 6 4 3 1 2 2 2 5 6 6 1 3 4 4 2 5 2 5 3 2 2 4 5 1 2 3 5 6 5 4 5 2 4 4 6 3 4 1 2 4 1 1 2 6 6 2 3 2 1 5 2 4 4 2 1 2 1 1 1 Die7 Die8 2 5 2 4 6 2 2 5 2 5 6 3 2 6 3 4 1 5 2 2 2 2 5 5 6 1 3 4 3 2 6 1 2 3 6 Die9 5 2 1 2 5 3 4 1 1 6 5 3 1 6 2 4 3 3 4 5 5 2 5 1 6 1 4 2 1 2 1 4 4 2 6 Die10 4 4 3 5 2 6 1 3 4 1 1 1 1 2 3 1 3 5 5 3 5 6 2 1 4 5 3 5 1 6 5 5 1 5 1 4 2 5 3 2 1 2 5 2 5 3 3 5 3 6 4 2 6 1 4 1 2 6 6 6 4 2 4 4 3 2 1 6 1 4
1 MATH221 Statistics for Decision Making Week 6 Lab Name:_______________________ Statistical Concepts: • Data Simulation • Confidence Intervals • Normal Probabilities Short Answer Writing Assignment All answers should be complete sentences. We need to find the confidence interval for the SLEEP variable. To do this, we need to find the mean and standard deviation with the Week 1 spreadsheet. Then we can the Week 5 spreadsheet to find the confidence interval. First, find the mean and standard deviation by copying the SLEEP variable and pasting it into the Week 1 spreadsheet. Write down the mean and the sample standard deviation as well as the count. Open the Week 5 spreadsheet and type in the values needed in the green cells at the top. The confidence interval is shown in the yellow cells as the lower limit and the upper limit. 1. Give and interpret the 95% confidence interval for the hours of sleep a student gets. Change the confidence level to 99% to find the 99% confidence interval for the SLEEP variable. 2. Give and interpret the 99% confidence interval for the hours of sleep a student gets. 3. Compare the 95% and 99% confidence intervals for the hours of sleep a student gets. Explain the difference between these intervals and why this difference occurs. Last Revised for SEP18 2 In the Week 2 Lab, you found the mean and the standard deviation for the HEIGHT variable for both males and females. Use those values for follow these directions to calculate the numbers again. (From Week 2 Lab: Calculate descriptive statistics for the variable Height by Gender. Click on Insert and then Pivot Table. Click in the top box and select all the data (including labels) from Height through Gender. Also click on “new worksheet” and then OK. On the right of the new sheet, click on Height and Gender, making sure that Gender is in the Rows box and Height is in the Values box. Click on the down arrow next to Height in the Values box and select Value Field Settings. In the pop up box, click Average then OK. Write these down. Then click on the down arrow next to Height in the Values box again and select Value Field Settings. In the pop up box, click on StdDev then OK. Write these values down.) You will also need the number of males and the number of females in the dataset. You can either use the same pivot table created above by selecting Count in the Value Field Settings, or you can actually count in the dataset. Then use the Week 5 spreadsheet to calculate the following confidence intervals. The male confidence interval would be one calculation in the spreadsheet and the females would be a second calculation. 4. Give and interpret the 95% confidence intervals for males and females on the HEIGHT variable. Which is wider and why? 5. Give and interpret the 99% confidence intervals for males and females on the HEIGHT variable. Which is wider and why? 6. Find the mean and standard deviation of the DRIVE variable by copying that variable into the Week 1 spreadsheet. Use the Week 4 spreadsheet to determine the percentage of data points from that data set that we would expect to be less than 40. To find the actual percentage in the dataset, sort the DRIVE variable and count how many of the data points are less than 40 out of the total 35 data points. That is the actual percentage. How does this compare with your prediction? Mean ______________ Last Revised for SEP18 Standard deviation ____________________ 3 Predicted percentage ______________________________ Actual percentage _____________________________ Comparison ___________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ 7. What percentage of data would you predict would be between 40 and 70 and what percentage would you predict would be more than 70 miles? Use the Week 4 spreadsheet again to find the percentage of the data set we expect to have values between 40 and 70 as well as for more than 70. Now determine the percentage of data points in the dataset that fall within this range, using same strategy as above for counting data points in the data set. How do each of these compare with your prediction and why is there a difference? Predicted percentage between 40 and 70 ______________________________ Actual percentage _____________________________________________ Predicted percentage more than 70 miles ________________________________ Actual percentage ___________________________________________ Comparison ____________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Why? __________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Last Revised for SEP18
1 MATH221 Statistics for Decision Making Week 4 Lab Name: Pitsil Kwabena Annan Statistical Concepts: • Probability • Binomial Probability Distribution Calculating Binomial Probabilities NOTE: For question 1, you will be using the same data file your instructor gave you for the Week 2 Lab. 1. Using the data file from your instructor (same one you used for the Week 2 Lab), calculate descriptive statistics for the variable (Coin) where each of the thirty-five students in the sample flipped a coin 10 times. Round your answers to three decimal places and type the mean and the standard deviation in the grey area below. Mean: 4.400 Standard deviation:1.499 NOTE: for questions 2-7, you will NOT be using the data file your instructor gave you. Please follow the instructions given in each question. Plotting the Binomial Probabilities ➢ For the next part of the lab, open the Week 3 Excel worksheet. This will be used for the next few questions, rather than the data file used for the first question. 1. Click on the “binomial tables” workbook 2. Type in n=10 and p=0.5; this simulates ten flips of a coin where x is counting the number of heads that occur throughout the ten flips 3. Create a scatter plot, either directly in this spreadsheet (if you are comfortable with those steps), or by using the Week 1 spreadsheet and copying the data from here onto that sheet (x would be the x variable, and P(X=x) would be the y variable. 4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 with n=10 and p=0.25 5. Repeat steps 2 and 3 with n=10 and p=0.75 6. In the end, you will have three scatter plots for the first question below. Last Revised for SEP18 2 2. Create scatter plots for the binomial distribution when p=0.50, p=0.25, and p=0.75 (see directions above). Paste the three scatter plots in the grey area below. Sucess Against One Fourth(1/4) 0.3 One Fourth 0.25 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7 8 9 10 Success Success Against One Half(1/2) 0.3 0.25 One half 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 Success Last Revised for SEP18 6 3 Success Against Three Fourths(3/4) 0.3 Three Fourths 0.25 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Success Calculating Descriptive Statistics Short Answer Writing Assignment – Both the calculated binomial probabilities and the descriptive statistics from the class database will be used to answer the following questions. Round all numeric answers to three decimal places. 3. List the probability value for each possibility in the binomial experiment calculated at the beginning of this lab, which was calculated with the probability of a success being ½. (Complete sentences not necessary; round your answers to three decimal places.) P(x=0) P(x=1) P(x=2) P(x=3) P(x=4) P(x=5) 0.001 0.010 0.044 0.117 0.205 0.246 P(x=6) P(x=7) P(x=8) P(x=9) P(x=10) 0.205 0.117 0.044 0.010 0.001 4. Give the probability for the following based on the calculations in question 3 above, with the probability of a success being ½. (Complete sentences not necessary; round your answers to three decimal places.) P(x≥1) P(x>1) P(4
Running head: MATH221 Statistics for Decision Making MATH221 Statistics for Decision Making Week 2 Lab Name: Pitsil Kwabena Annan Corey Greenlaw Date: 01/20/2019 1 MATH221 Statistics for Decision Making 2 Creating Graphs 1. Create a pie chart for the variable Car Color: Select the column with the Car variable, including the title of Car Color. Click on Insert, and then Recommended Charts. It should show a clustered column and click OK. Once the chart is shown, right click on the chart (main area) and select Change Chart Type. Select Pie and OK. Click on the pie slices, right click Add Data Labels, and select Add Data Callouts. Add an appropriate title. Copy and paste the chart here. Vehicle Color Frequency white, 1, 3% silver, 7, 20% black, 7, 20% red, 4, 11% blue, 9, 26% orange, 1, 3% green, 5, 14% dark blue, 1, 3% 2. Create a histogram for the variable Height. You need to create a frequency distribution for the data by hand. Use 5 classes, find the class width, and then create the classes. Once you have the classes, count how many data points fall within each class. It may be helpful to sort the data based on the Height variable first. Once you have the classes and the frequency counts, put those data into the table in the Freq Distribution worksheet of the Week 1 Excel file. Copy and paste the graph here. MATH221 Statistics for Decision Making 3 Heights by inches 14 13 12 STUDENTS 10 8 8 6 5 4 5 4 2 0 61 - 63 64 - 66 67 - 69 70 - 72 73 - 75 HEIGHT FREQUENCY 3. Create a scatter plot with the variables of height and money. Copy the height variable from the data file and paste it into the x column in the Scatter Plot worksheet of the week 1 Excel file. Copy the money variable from the data file and paste it into the y column. Copy and paste the scatter plot below. Scatter Plot of height against Money in $ 60 Money ($) 50 40 30 20 10 0 0 10 20 30 40 Height 50 60 70 80 MATH221 Statistics for Decision Making 4 Calculating Descriptive Statistics 4. Calculate descriptive statistics for the variable Height by Gender. Sort the data by gender by clicking on Data and then Sort. Copy the heights of the males form the data file into the Descriptive Statistics worksheet of the week 1 Excel file. Type the standard deviations below. These are sample data. Then from the data file, copy and paste the female data into the Descriptive Statistics workbook and do the same Females Males Mean 67.058 69.666 Standard deviation 3.111 3.307 Short Answer Writing Assignment All answers should be complete sentences. 5. What is the most common color of car for students who participated in this survey? Explain how you arrived at your answer. The most common color is blue. This answer was arrived at by creating a pie chart that of vehicle color as the variable. The pie chart displayed the color frequency by numerical value & as the total sample percentage. The color with the largest percentage was blue at 26% 6. What is seen in the histogram created for the heights of students in this class (include the shape)? Explain your answer. In the histogram created for heights of students in this class, it is seen that the heights are almost symmetrically distributed. This is so since the majority of the heights fall in the middle bin of 67-69 resulting in a histogram of two halves that are almost a mirror of each other. 7. What is seen in the scatter plot for the height and money variables? Explain your answer. In the scatter plot for the height of student and money variables, it is quite evident that that money does not determine the height of the student. In other words there is no relationship that exists between the height of a student and the money they have. This is so since increase or decrease in money had little impact on the height of the student. MATH221 Statistics for Decision Making 5 8. Compare the mean for the heights of males and the mean for the heights of females in these data. Compare the values and explain what can be concluded based on the numbers. The mean for the heights of the male gender was greater than the mean for the height of the female gender by 2.6 inches. Therefore we can conclude that students belonging to the male gender are generally taller than students belonging to the female gender. 9. Compare the standard deviation for the heights of males and the standard deviation for the heights of females in the class. Compare the values and explain what can be concluded based on the numbers. The standard deviation for the heights of male students was slightly greater than the standard deviation for the heights of female students. Therefore, we can conclude that the heights of the male students differed significantly from the mean for the heights of male students in comparison to the way the heights of the female students differed from the mean for the heights of female students. 10. Using the empirical rule, 95% of female heights should be between what two values? Either show work or explain how your answer was calculated. According to the 95% empirical rule, the female heights will be between ̅𝑥 ± 2s = 67.058 – 2(3.111) = 60.836 inches and 67.058 + 2(3.111) =73.28 inches 11. Using the empirical rule, 68% of male heights should be between what two values? Either show work or explain how your answer was calculated. According to the 95% empirical rule, the female heights will be between ̅𝑥 ± s =69.666-3.307= 66.359 inches and 69.666+3.307= 72.973

Tutor Answer

pallveechem123
School: Purdue University

Please find attached the complete work.Kindly do ask in case of any doubtPallvee

1

MATH 221 Statistics for Decision Making
Week 6 iLab
Name: ____
Statistical Concepts:
• Data Simulation
• Confidence Intervals
• Normal Probabilities
Short Answer Writing Assignment
All answers should be complete sentences.
We need to find the confidence interval for the SLEEP variable. To do this, we need to
find the mean and then find the maximum error. Then we can use a calculator to find the
interval, (x – E, x + E).
First, find the mean. Under that column, in cell B38, type =AVERAGE (A2:A36).
Under that in cell A39, type =STDEV (A2:A36), For A40, type=COUNT (A2; A36),
Alpha B44=1-Confidence (95%) Now we can find the maximum error of the confidence
interval. To find the maximum error, we use the “confidence” formula. In cell B45, type
=CONFIDENCE (B44, B39, B40). Then we calculate the confidence interval by using
a calculator to subtract the maximum error from the mean (x-E) and add it to the mean
(x+E).
1. Give and interpret the 95% confidence interval for the hours of sleep a student gets.
(5 points)
A 95% confidence interval for the hours of sleep a student gets is (6.7, 7.7).
With 95% confidence, it can be said that the hours of sleep a student gets is between the
bounds of the confidence interval.

Then, you can go to cell E45 and type =CONFIDENCE (E44, B39, B40) to find the
maximum error for a 99% confidence interval. Again, you would need to use a calculator
to subtract this and add this to the mean to find the actual confidence interval.
2. Give and interpret the 99% confidence interval for the hours of sleep a student gets.
(5 points)
A 99% confidence interval for the hours of s...

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Anonymous
awesome work thanks

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