BIO 1302 CSU Biodiversity Discussion

Anonymous
timer Asked: Feb 19th, 2019
account_balance_wallet $20

Question Description

BIO 1302 UNIT 4

JOURNAL

Based on what you learned in Unit IV, describe the biodiversity in the area you live in. What kind of habitat do you live in, and what plants and organisms are common? What are some of the ecosystem services this biodiversity provides for you and your city or town?

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words. No references or citations are necessary.

UNIT 4 HOMEWORK

Unit IV Homework

This activity can be completed in your backyard, in your office yard, a nearby park, an urban green space, or anywhere you can get a little bit of nature under your feet!

Now that you have learned about food webs and biodiversity, you will explore the environment “in your own backyard.” It may be easiest to print out this sheet and take it with you to complete the assignment. You can always record your answers on a separate piece of paper while outside and then bring them back to your computer to type in your responses afterward.

Scientists are trained to take very detailed notes when they head out into the field. This is because all of the information you can collect could be important to analyzing your data in the future. It is important to be descriptive and even use drawings if you need to make sure your data is as complete as possible.

Part I (4 points each = 28 points)

The first thing scientists record when out in the field is general data. You will practice this by filling in the information below.

Date:

Location (City, State, Country):

Time of day:

Temperature outside (estimate if you don’t have a phone with capabilities or a thermometer around):

Weather (e.g., rainy, humid, dry, cloudy, sunny, overcast):

Number of people around:

Describe the space/habitat (Is it a prairie? Does it have tall grasses, are there a lot of trees, or is it near water or a city?):

Part II (20 points)

Now, let’s do some exploring and observing. Sit down on the soil, and take a closer look. Do you see small insects? Do you notice different types of grasses, weeds, and small flowers?

Take a few minutes to identify everything you can in the area. (Set a maximum time to about 15 minutes). Record what you find in the table below, and remember to be as descriptive as possible.

In the section “Label of what you found,” identify as best you can what it is you are looking at. Is it a plant (grass, weed, tree, flower), reptile, amphibian, insect, arachnid (spider), mammal, or bird? Do you know what species it is? You can use resources to help you identify what you find. If you are in the United States, download the iNaturalist app, and you can use field guides on the app to help identify what you see. If you are at a park, at the visitor center, there may be field guide pamphlets or online pamphlets to help with identifications. You can also try finding field guides for your area online. (Type the following terms into Google: “field guide to plants, butterflies, or whatever you’re looking at in [insert the place you are]”). Be as specific as possible.

In the description column, describe what it is. How tall is it? What distinguishing features does it have? Does it have a scent? Does it have a color?

In the last column, count how many of that species you see in the area.

You are filling in the table with what you find. Your grade is based on the quality of filling in the details of the table (label, description, and how many found). You will need to include at least five species.

Label of what you found

Description

How many found

Part III (2 points each = 16 points)

You will now build two food chains using what you found. You may not find all parts of the food chain as seeing top trophic levels are more rare than seeing primary producers. In that case, think about what would live in this habitat, look for signs of these animals (e.g., tracks, burrows, nests), and fill in the chart with what you think would be there.

Primary Producer

Primary Consumer

Secondary Consumer

Tertiary Consumer

Example

oak tree

inchworm

field mouse

hawk

1

2

Questions (36 pts)


1. In this unit, we looked at threats to biodiversity. Describe what is affecting the biodiversity in the area you are in? What natural or man-made disturbances have happened in the area? How could the biodiversity increase in the area? Your response should be at least 200 words in length.BIO 1302 UNIT 4

JOURNAL

Based on what you learned in Unit IV, describe the biodiversity in the area you live in. What kind of habitat do you live in, and what plants and organisms are common? What are some of the ecosystem services this biodiversity provides for you and your city or town?

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words. No references or citations are necessary.

UNIT 4 HOMEWORK

Unit IV Homework

This activity can be completed in your backyard, in your office yard, a nearby park, an urban green space, or anywhere you can get a little bit of nature under your feet!

Now that you have learned about food webs and biodiversity, you will explore the environment “in your own backyard.” It may be easiest to print out this sheet and take it with you to complete the assignment. You can always record your answers on a separate piece of paper while outside and then bring them back to your computer to type in your responses afterward.

Scientists are trained to take very detailed notes when they head out into the field. This is because all of the information you can collect could be important to analyzing your data in the future. It is important to be descriptive and even use drawings if you need to make sure your data is as complete as possible.

Part I (4 points each = 28 points)

The first thing scientists record when out in the field is general data. You will practice this by filling in the information below.

Date:

Location (City, State, Country):

Time of day:

Temperature outside (estimate if you don’t have a phone with capabilities or a thermometer around):

Weather (e.g., rainy, humid, dry, cloudy, sunny, overcast):

Number of people around:

Describe the space/habitat (Is it a prairie? Does it have tall grasses, are there a lot of trees, or is it near water or a city?):

Part II (20 points)

Now, let’s do some exploring and observing. Sit down on the soil, and take a closer look. Do you see small insects? Do you notice different types of grasses, weeds, and small flowers?

Take a few minutes to identify everything you can in the area. (Set a maximum time to about 15 minutes). Record what you find in the table below, and remember to be as descriptive as possible.

In the section “Label of what you found,” identify as best you can what it is you are looking at. Is it a plant (grass, weed, tree, flower), reptile, amphibian, insect, arachnid (spider), mammal, or bird? Do you know what species it is? You can use resources to help you identify what you find. If you are in the United States, download the iNaturalist app, and you can use field guides on the app to help identify what you see. If you are at a park, at the visitor center, there may be field guide pamphlets or online pamphlets to help with identifications. You can also try finding field guides for your area online. (Type the following terms into Google: “field guide to plants, butterflies, or whatever you’re looking at in [insert the place you are]”). Be as specific as possible.

In the description column, describe what it is. How tall is it? What distinguishing features does it have? Does it have a scent? Does it have a color?

In the last column, count how many of that species you see in the area.

You are filling in the table with what you find. Your grade is based on the quality of filling in the details of the table (label, description, and how many found). You will need to include at least five species.

Label of what you found

Description

How many found

Part III (2 points each = 16 points)

You will now build two food chains using what you found. You may not find all parts of the food chain as seeing top trophic levels are more rare than seeing primary producers. In that case, think about what would live in this habitat, look for signs of these animals (e.g., tracks, burrows, nests), and fill in the chart with what you think would be there.

Primary Producer

Primary Consumer

Secondary Consumer

Tertiary Consumer

Example

oak tree

inchworm

field mouse

hawk

1

2

Questions (36 pts)


1. In this unit, we looked at threats to biodiversity. Describe what is affecting the biodiversity in the area you are in? What natural or man-made disturbances have happened in the area? How could the biodiversity increase in the area? Your response should be at least 200 words in length.

Tutor Answer

MathChampionRUP
School: University of Maryland

hi there,, please find the attached answer to your assignment. i hope my answer will be satisfactory and you will give me a good review. thanks✌

Running head: BIODIVERSITY

1

BIODIVERSITY
Course title:
Student name:
School affiliation:
Professor’s name:
Date

BIODIVERSITY

2

Unit IV homework
Journal
Biodiversity is the foundation of ecosystem services. It includes variability among all
aspects of living organisms from all sources such as aquatic, terrestrial and marine organisms.
Biodiversity shows the interactions between species in an ecosystem (Forester, 2016). I live in a
tropical like habitat where there the climate is warm and wet. The ecosystem is rich in species of
all manners, plants and animals fill the habitat. The biodiversity around has food, water and
shelter for all the living organisms around.
The habitat is composed of many trees which grow tall to compete for sunlight with other
plants; the conifers act as wind breaks and provide shelter to the living organisms around. There
are beautiful flowers and grasses around which provide ground cover and nesting sites for birds.
Vines around provide cover for nesting birds and also give nectar to insects such as bees. The
fruiting plants around provide food for human and birds. The habitat has water which is needed
by both plant and animals for reproduction. Looking around, there are snags where small
animals like squirrels live, the rocks around provide shelter for rabbits, snakes, frogs and lizards.
Taking a close look on the soil, there are small organisms which live there which include
nematodes, ants, earthworms and insects. These organisms help in decomposition of organic
matter in the habitat making the soils healthy and full of nutrients.

BIODIVERSITY

3

Part I
Date
The survey was conducted on 22nd Feb 2019 so that I could meet the requirement of
su...

flag Report DMCA
Review

Anonymous
Tutor went the extra mile to help me with this essay. Citations were a bit shaky but I appreciated how well he handled APA styles and how ok he was to change them even though I didnt specify. Got a B+ which is believable and acceptable.

Similar Questions
Hot Questions
Related Tags
Study Guides

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors