Engineering: Gas powered car

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timer Asked: Feb 24th, 2019
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I would like someone to answer and break down each question in steps by showing their work so I can get a visual on how they received their answer.

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An engineer wants to determine how the weight of a gas-powered car, x, affects gas mileage, y. The accompanying data represent the weights of various domestic cars and their miles per gallon in the city for the most recent model year.

Complete parts (a) through (d) below.

Click here to view the weight and gas mileage data. 1

(a) Find the least-squares regression line treating weight as the explanatory variable and miles per gallon as the response variable. y = x +

(Round the x coefficient to five decimal places as needed. Round the constant to two decimal places as needed.)

(b) Interpret the slope and y-intercept, if appropriate. Choose the correct answer below and fill in any answer boxes in your choice.

(Use the answer from part a to find this answer.)

2/23/2019 Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton 2. An engineer wants to determine how the weight of a gas-powered car, x, affects gas mileage, y. The accompanying data represent the weights of various domestic cars and their miles per gallon in the city for the most recent model year. Complete parts (a) through (d) below. 1 Click here to view the weight and gas mileage data. (a) Find the least-squares regression line treating weight as the explanatory variable and miles per gallon as the response variable. y= x+ (Round the x coefficient to five decimal places as needed. Round the constant to two decimal places as needed.) (b) Interpret the slope and y-intercept, if appropriate. Choose the correct answer below and fill in any answer boxes in your choice. (Use the answer from part a to find this answer.) A. For every pound added to the weight of the car, gas mileage in the city will decrease by mile(s) per gallon, on average. A weightless car will get miles per gallon, on average. B. For every pound added to the weight of the car, gas mileage in the city will decrease by mile(s) per gallon, on average. It is not appropriate to interpret the y-intercept. C. A weightless car will get interpret the slope. miles per gallon, on average. It is not appropriate to D. It is not appropriate to interpret the slope or the y-intercept. (c) A certain gas-powered car weighs 3700 pounds and gets 20 miles per gallon. Is the miles per gallon of this car above average or below average for cars of this weight? Below Above (d) Would it be reasonable to use the least-squares regression line to predict the miles per gallon of a hybrid gas and electric car? Why or why not? A. Yes, because the hybrid is partially powered by gas. B. No, because the absolute value of the correlation coefficient is less than the critical value for a sample size of n = 11. C. Yes, because the absolute value of the correlation coefficient is greater than the critical value for a sample size of n = 11. D. No, because the hybrid is a different type of car. 1: Car Weight and MPG https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math 2/12 2/23/2019 https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton Weight (pounds), x Miles per Gallon, y 3754 17 3960 16 2760 24 3511 20 3377 21 2978 23 3641 18 2525 24 3530 19 3793 18 3261 18 3/12 2/23/2019 Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton 3. The accompanying data represent the number of days absent, x, and the final exam score, y, for a sample of college students in a general education course at a large state university. Complete parts (a) through (e) below. 2 Click the icon to view the absence count and final exam score data. 3 Click the icon to view a table of critical values for the correlation coefficient. (a) Find the least-squares regression line treating number of absences as the explanatory variable and the final exam score as the response variable. y= x+ (Round to three decimal places as needed.) (b) Interpret the slope and the y-intercept, if appropriate. Choose the correct answer below and fill in any answer boxes in your choice. (Round to three decimal places as needed.) A. For every additional absence, a student's final exam score drops average. It is not appropriate to interpret the y-intercept. points, on B. The average final exam score of students who miss no classes is appropriate to interpret the slope. . It is not C. For every additional absence, a student's final exam score drops points, on average. The average final exam score of students who miss no classes is . D. It is not appropriate to interpret the slope or the y-intercept. (c) Predict the final exam score for a student who misses five class periods. y= (Round to two decimal places as needed.) Compute the residual. (Round to two decimal places as needed.) Is the final exam score above or below average for this number of absences? Below Above (d) Draw the least-squares regression line on the scatter diagram of the data. Choose the correct graph below. B. Final Exam Score Exam Scores vs. Absences 100 80 60 40 20 0 2 4 6 8 Exam Scores vs. Absences Final Exam Score A. 10 100 80 60 40 20 0 2 Number of Absences D. Final Exam Score Exam Scores vs. Absences 100 80 60 40 20 0 2 4 6 6 8 10 8 10 Exam Scores vs. Absences Final Exam Score C. 4 Number of Absences 100 80 60 40 20 0 Number of Absences 2 4 6 8 10 Number of Absences (e) Would it be reasonable to use the least-squares regression line to predict the final exam score for a student who has missed 15 class periods? Why or why not? A. No, because 15 absences is outside the scope of the model. B. No, because the absolute value of the correlation coefficient is less than the critical value for a https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math 4/12 2/23/2019 Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton sample size of n = 10. C. Yes, because the absolute value of the correlation coefficient is greater than the critical value for a sample size of n = 10. D. Yes, because the purpose of finding the regression line is to make predictions outside the scope of the model. 2: Absences and Final Exam Scores No. of absences, x 0 Final exam score, y 89.1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 85.5 83.3 80.3 78.9 74.6 63.5 71.6 65.9 66.2 3: Critical Values for Correlation Coefficient https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math 5/12 2/23/2019 https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton 6/12 2/23/2019 Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton 4. What is meant by a marginal distribution? What is meant by a conditional distribution? What is meant by a marginal distribution? A. A marginal distribution is a frequency or relative frequency distribution of either the row or column variable in a contingency table. B. A marginal distribution is the relative frequency of each category of one variable, given a specific value of the other variable in a contingency table. C. A marginal distribution is the effect of either row variable or the column variable in the contingency table. D. A marginal distribution is the relative distribution of both row or column variables in the contingency table. What is meant by a conditional distribution? A. A conditional distribution is the relative association between two categorical variables in the contingency table. B. A conditional distribution is a frequency or relative frequency distribution of either the row or column variable in a contingency table. C. A conditional distribution is the relative distribution of both row or column variables in the contingency table. D. A conditional distribution lists the relative frequency of each category of the response variable, given a specific value of the explanatory variable in a contingency table. https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math 7/12 2/23/2019 Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton 5. Consider the data set given in the accompanying table. Complete parts (a) through (d). 4 Click the icon to view the data table. (a) Construct a frequency marginal distribution. x1 x2 x3 y1 20 15 50 y2 30 15 50 Marginal distribution Marginal distribution (b) Construct a relative frequency marginal distribution. x1 x2 x3 y1 20 15 50 y2 30 15 50 Relative frequency marginal distribution Relative frequency marginal distribution (Round to three decimal places as needed.) 1 (c) Construct a conditional distribution by x. x1 x2 x3 1 1 1 y1 y2 Total (d) Draw a bar graph of the conditional distribution found in part (c). Let the blue (left) bars represent the conditional distribution of y1 and let the red (right) bars represent the conditional distribution of y2 . Choose the correct graph below. B. 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 x1 x2 x3 C. 1 Relative Frequency 1 Relative Frequency Relative Frequency A. 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 x1 x2 x3 1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 x1 x2 x3 4: Data Table https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math x1 x2 x3 y1 20 15 50 y2 30 15 50 8/12 2/23/2019 Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton 6. In an effort to gauge how the country's population feels about the immigration, researchers surveyed adult citizens. One question asked was, "On the whole, do you think immigration is a good thing or a bad thing for this country today?" The results of the survey, by ethnicity, are given in the acompanying table. Complete parts (a) through (f). 5 Click the icon to view the data table. (a) How many adult citizens were surveyed? How many Hispanics were surveyed? (b) Construct a relative frequency marginal distribution. Ethnicity Non-Hispanic Whites Blacks Hispanics Good thing 180 154 147 Bad thing 110 101 33 Good and bad 9 14 12 No opinion 9 11 6 Opinion Relative frequency marginal distribution Relative frequency marginal distribution (Round to three decimal places as needed.) 1 (c) What proportion of adult citizens feel that immigration is a good thing for this country? (Round to three decimal places as needed.) (d) Construct a conditional distribution of immigration opinion by ethnicity. Ethnicity Opinion Non-Hispanic Whites Blacks Hispanics Good thing Bad thing Good and bad No opinion Total 1 (Round to three decimal places as needed.) 1 1 (e) Draw a bar graph of the conditional distribution found in part (d). Let the left-most (blue) bars represent "Good thing" opinion, the middle-left (green) bars represent "Bad thing" opinion, the middle-right (red) bars represent the "Good and bad" opinion, and the right-most (gray) bars represent "No opinion". Choose the correct graph below. A. B. https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math C. 9/12 2/23/2019 Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton 1 1 1 0.8 0.8 0.8 (f) Is ethnicity associated with opinion regarding immigration? If so, how? Choose the correct answer below. A. No, ethnicity is not associated with opinion regarding immigration. B. Yes, ethnicity is associated with opinion regarding immigration. Hispanics are more likely to feel that immigration is a good thing for the country and much less likely to feel it is a bad thing. C. Yes, ethnicity is associated with opinion regarding immigration. Hispanics are more likely to feel that immigration is a bad thing for the country and much less likely to feel it is a good thing. 5: Data Table Non-Hispanic Whites Blacks Hispanics Good thing 180 154 147 Bad thing 110 101 33 Good and bad 9 14 12 No opinion 9 11 6 https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math 10/12 2/23/2019 Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton 7. Is there an association between party affiliation and gender? The accompanying data represent the gender and party affiliation of registered voters based on a random sample of 810 adults. Complete parts (a) through (f). 6 Click the icon to view the data table. (a) Construct a frequency marginal distribution. Gender Political Party Female Male Republican 110 120 Democrat 150 101 Independent 150 179 Frequency Marginal Distribution for Gender Frequency Marginal Distribution for Political Party (b) Construct a relative frequency marginal distribution. Gender Political Party Female Male Republican 110 120 Democrat 150 101 Independent 150 179 Relative frequency marginal distribution Relative frequency marginal distribution (Round to three decimal places as needed.) 1 (c) What proportion of registered voters considers themselves to be Independent? (Round to three decimal places as needed.) (d) Construct a conditional distribution of party affiliation by gender. Gender Political Party Female Male Republican Democrat Independent Total 1 1 (Round to three decimal places as needed.) (e) Draw a bar graph of the conditional distribution found in part (d). Let the red bars (left most) represent Republican, the blue bars (middle) represent Democrat, and the green bars (right most) represent Independent. Choose the correct graph below. A. B. https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math C. 11/12 2/23/2019 Homework #7 (Sections 4.2 part 2 & 4.4)-Dayja Melton (f) Is gender associated with party affiliation? If so, how? Choose the correct answer below. A. Yes, gender is associated with party affiliation. Males are more likely to be Independents and less likely to be Democrats. B. Yes, gender is associated with party affiliation. Males are more likely to be Independents and less likely to be Republicans. C. No, gender is not associated with party affiliation. 6: More Info https://xlitemprod.pearsoncmg.com/api/v1/print/math Female Male Republican 110 120 Democrat 150 101 Independent 150 179 12/12

Tutor Answer

andythewxman
School: New York University

Solutions are attached, answers in red. There were a couple questions I could not do because the grap...

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Anonymous
awesome work thanks

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