Hinduism Discussion Questions

Anonymous
timer Asked: Feb 24th, 2019
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Question Description

Attached are the questions.

Book: The Bhagavad-Gita and selections from the Upanishads (attached)

Should be a total of 3 question, the bottom 2 is the option of pick 1 or the other

Due Wednesday February 27 @9AM Eastern time

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Text Explanation – 30 points. Select three: 10 points each

For each of these, identify the major concepts that are being addressed here. See clues for each. You need not answer each question, but you should address why this passage is important.


Bhagavad Gita: 2:47-48: 

“You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work.  You should never engage in action for the sake of reward, nor should you long for inaction.  Perform work in this world, Arjuna, as a man established within himself – without selfish attachments, and alike in success and defeat.”  

 Which yoga is this? What does this say about dharma, and varna? How does this reinterpret the Vedic tradition?


Bhagavad Gita 7:6-7:

“Learn that this is the womb of all creatures; I am the source of all the universe, just as I am its dissolution. Nothing is higher than I am; Arjuna, all that exists is woven on me, like a web of pearls on thread.”

 What is the relationship between Krishna and creation? How would a Vaisnava such as Ramanuja understand this passage?

SELECT ONE

1) Chandogya Upanisad 6.15.13: 

“‘Put this chunk of salt in a container of water and come back tomorrow.’ The son did as he was told, and the father said to him: ‘The chunk of salt you put in the water last evening – bring it here.’ He groped for it but could not find it, as it has dissolved completely. ‘Now, take a sip from this corner,’ said the father. ‘How does it taste?’ ‘Salty.’ … The finest essence here - -that constitutes the self of this whole world; that is the truth; that is the self (Atman). And that’s how you are, Svetaketu.” 

 What is the understanding of the atman? Of Brahman? How does this exemplify Upanisadic wisdom? How does this reinterpret the meaning of Vedic religion? How would Sankara or Ramanuja interpret this passage?

2) Katha Upanisad 3:3-4: 

“Know the self as a rider in a chariot, and the body, as simply the chariot. Know the intellect as the charioteer, and the mind, as simply the reins. The senses, they say, are the horses, and sense objects are the paths around them; He who is linked to the body (atman), senses, and mind, the wise proclaim as the one who enjoys.” 

 What is the understanding of the atman? Of Brahman? How does this exemplify Upanisadic wisdom? How does this reinterpret the meaning of Vedic religion? How would Sankara or Ramanuja interpret this passage?

Text Explanation – 30 points. Select three: 10 points each For each of these, identify the major concepts that are being addressed here. See clues for each. You need not answer each question, but you should address why this passage is important. 1. Bhagavad Gita: 2:47-48: “You have the right to work, but never to the fruit of work. You should never engage in action for the sake of reward, nor should you long for inaction. Perform work in this world, Arjuna, as a man established within himself – without selfish attachments, and alike in success and defeat.” Which yoga is this? What does this say about dharma, and varna? How does this reinterpret the Vedic tradition? 2. Bhagavad Gita 7:6-7: “Learn that this is the womb of all creatures; I am the source of all the universe, just as I am its dissolution. Nothing is higher than I am; Arjuna, all that exists is woven on me, like a web of pearls on thread.” What is the relationship between Krishna and creation? How would a Vaisnava such as Ramanuja understand this passage? SELECT ONE 1) Chandogya Upanisad 6.15.13: “‘Put this chunk of salt in a container of water and come back tomorrow.’ The son did as he was told, and the father said to him: ‘The chunk of salt you put in the water last evening – bring it here.’ He groped for it but could not find it, as it has dissolved completely. ‘Now, take a sip from this corner,’ said the father. ‘How does it taste?’ ‘Salty.’ … The finest essence here - -that constitutes the self of this whole world; that is the truth; that is the self (Atman). And that’s how you are, Svetaketu.” What is the understanding of the atman? Of Brahman? How does this exemplify Upanisadic wisdom? How does this reinterpret the meaning of Vedic religion? How would Sankara or Ramanuja interpret this passage? 2) Katha Upanisad 3:3-4: “Know the self as a rider in a chariot, and the body, as simply the chariot. Know the intellect as the charioteer, and the mind, as simply the reins. The senses, they say, are the horses, and sense objects are the paths around them; He who is linked to the body (atman), senses, and mind, the wise proclaim as the one who enjoys.” What is the understanding of the atman? Of Brahman? How does this exemplify Upanisadic wisdom? How does this reinterpret the meaning of Vedic religion? How would Sankara or Ramanuja interpret this passage?

Tutor Answer

mwalimumusah
School: New York University

Attached.

Running head: HINDUISM

1

Hinduism
Student’s Name
Institutional Affiliation

HINDUISM

2
Hinduism

Q1. According to the definition of the karma yoga in the Bhagavad Gita, one has a right
to act alone. There are three types of action: Tama, which is inaction that lacks motivation;
Rajas, which is the desire driven by the action for fruit; and Sattva, that is obligatory action with
no desire or fruit (The Bhagavad Gita: A Verse Translation, 2013). The karma yoga, therefore,
involves a path of unselfish action, popularly known as Sattva.
Dharma refers to the behaviors considered to be in line with the Rta—the form that holds
the universe and life. The dharma constitutes laws that guide the nature of conduct and virtues
that dictate the right way of living. Varna, on the other hand, refers to the classification of
individuals based on their qualities. The karma yoga, therefore, offers a pathway in which
individuals should act in a social setting, and this constitutes the dharma behaviors. For instance,
individuals should practice the unselfish action that involves oblig...

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