GSP187 SUSS Report for performance management

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will give the necessary materials for you to work on. all the information is in the PDF. need it urgently though. thanks!

GSP187e – ASSESSMENT RUBRIC FOR “GROUP PROJECT” - 2ND FACE-TO-FACE SESSION 2 (Gallery Walk Presentation) RATING Score CRITERIA 5 to 4: EXCELLENT 3 to 2: GOOD 1 to 0: FAIR PERFORMANCE PROBLEM DEFINITION Problem performance statement is clearly defined and easy to understand. Describes, identifies and provides relevant information that explains the relevant issues behind the problem. Problem performance statement is clearly defined but lacks sufficient information that helps to describe the problem for a better understanding of the relevant issues behind the problem. Problem performance statement is not clear and lacks adequate information that helps to describe the problem. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Able to describe in detail, critically analyse and justify all actions taken to resolve the performance problems. All recommendations are well justified. Able to describe, analyse and justify some of the actions taken to resolve the performance management problems. Some recommendations are justified. Able to briefly describe, analyse and justify few of the actions taken to resolve the performance management problems. Few recommendations are justified. LEARNING Shows that learning has effectively demonstrated where new ideas are applied to improve the outcomes of the team project (learning from comments from participants). Also shows that learning has taken place where taught performance management framework, processes and practices are well applied in the team project through the presentation. Shows that learning has demonstrated where new ideas are applied to improve the outcomes of the team project (learning from comments from participants). Also shows that learning has taken place where the performance management framework, processes and practices are sufficiently applied in the team project through the presentation. Response and comments from participants are lacking and ideas presented may not help to improve the outcome of the team project. Also shows that limited learning has taken place where the performance management framework, processes and practices are adequately applied in the team project through the presentation. ENGAGEMENT Engagement with participants is highly interactive. Questions are answered clearly and insightful questions are raised to offer different perspectives from the participants. Shows good commitments to solve problems even if there is no clear solution. Engagement with participants is interactive. Questions from participants are appropriately answered. Show sufficient commitments to solve problems even if there is no clear solution. Engagement with participants is found lacking; one-way communication approach. Did not adequately answered questions raised by participants. Show little commitments to solve problems even if there is no clear solution. PREPAREDNESS Overall, the team has prepared and rehearsed very well for the presentation, supported with useful and relevant information and explanations to facilitate participants’ understanding. Overall, the team has prepared and rehearsed sufficiently well for the presentation, supported with necessary information and explanations to facilitate participants’ understanding. Overall, the team has not prepared and rehearsed adequately well for the presentation, and there was insufficient or unclear information and explanations to facilitate participants’ understanding. Copyright SUSS 2017. All rights reserved. Page 1 of 1
Manpower ng ManpowerPlanni Planning Performance gement RecruitmentMana & Selection Compensation & Benefits Benefits Compensation & HR CAPABILITY Performance Recruitment &Management Select ion TOOLKIT Learni ng & & Developmen t Learning Development Discipline Grievance Handli ng & Exit P rocedure Talent Management & Succession Planning Talent ManRelations agment Employee Career gement CareerMana Management 1 To start, you can navigate around the content page to get to the respective section that you wish to access. 2 To go back to the content page, simply click on the home icon on the top left-hand corner of every page. 3 You can also download the various tools and templates directly. * Kindly note that internet connection is required 4 Click on any italicized / underlined text to go to the reference page. Tips on Toolkit DISCLAIMER By registering and downloading the HR Capability Toolkit, you agree to the following: The Information, forms and templates (“Information”) contained in this Toolkit are for general information purposes only. Whilst we endeavour to keep the Information up-todate and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, expressed or implied, regarding the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability of the Information for any purpose. Any reliance you place on the Information is therefore strictly at your own risk. Further this Toolkit and the website is provided on an “as available” basis. In no event will SNEF, SPRING or WDA will be liable for any loss or damage, including, without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage arising from, or in connection with the use of the Information or this Toolkit or any material contained on the website. 04 Performance management Introduction Purpose Benefits Framework APPENDICES A4.1 Guidelines on Conducting Performance Appraisal A4.2 Performance Appraisal Methods A4.3 Guidelines on Moderating Performance Ratings A4.4 Recommended Target Setting Measures A4.5 Guidelines for Crafting a Performance Improvement Plan A4.6 Guidelines on Writing Performance Objectives A4.7 Guidelines on Terminating Non-Performing Employees [ 02 ] [ 02 ] [ 02 ] [ 03 ] [ 19 ] [ 26 ] [ 32 ] [ 41 ] [ 43 ] [ 48 ] [ 52 ] case stories Heatec Jietong Pte Ltd QSS Safety Products (S) Pte Ltd [ 56 ] [ 59 ] Tools And Templates click to download ( internet connection required ) T4.1 T4.2 T4.3 T4.4 T4.5 PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL FORM (EXECUTIVE) PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL FORM (NON-EXECUTIVE) PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PLAN PERFORMANCE RANKING LETTER OF PROMOTION Performance management PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - INTRODUCTION, PURPOSE AND BENEFITS 02 Introduction Performance Management is the integrated process of maintaining or improving employee job performance through the use of objective setting, appraisal, coaching and feedback. Purpose This module establishes the guidelines to appraise and continuously monitor the performance of employees based on agreed performance objectives. Benefits An effective performance management system enables a company to leverage on its manpower resources to achieve its short- and long-term goals. Clear and measurable goals can also be set for employees to support the company’s goals. A well implemented performance management process establishes a strong link between an employee’s performance and rewards through objective measurement of his performance and achievements. As part of the performance management process, employees’ developmental needs and career aspirations, two of the most critical factors to address when building an engaged and motivated workforce, are also identified. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK Performance Management framework Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 03 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK TOOLS / TEMPLATES APPENDICES / REFERENCES 04 STEPS IN PROCESS MAP [A4.1] Guidelines for performance apprasial [A] DEVELOPING PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL FORM [A4.2] Methods of appraisal [B] DEFINING RESPONSIBILITIES Step 1 Recommended performance measures DEVELOPING [C] ACTION PLAN DETERMINING APPRAISAL CYCLE [T4.1 and T4.2] Performance appraisal form (Executive and NonExecutive) [A4.6] Guidelines for writing performance objectives [A4.1] Guidelines for performance apprasial Steps 2, 3, 4 [A4.4] Recommended target setting measures [D] CONDUCTING APPRAISAL DISCUSSION [T4.1 and T4.2] Performance appraisal form (Executive and Non-Executive) [T4.3] Performance improvement plan form [A4.1] Guidelines for performance apprasial Steps 5, 6, 7, 8 [T4.1 and T4.2] Performance appraisal form [E] DEVELOPING ACTION PLAN [T4.4] Performance ranking template [T4.5] Letter of promotion [A4.3] Guidelines on moderating performance ratings [A4.7] Guidelines on termination of nonperforming employees Steps 9, 10, 11, 12 Performance improvement plan procedure Figure 4-1: Performance Management framework Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK management START 9 1 Approve recommendations Determine performance appraising supervisors Hr department 2 Agree on criteria for appraisal, notify staff of Performance Appraisal (PA) period 3 Disseminate PA information & document to supervisors and employees 9 10 8 Collate all forms and send to MD for approval Prepare promotion/ increment letters employee 4 Complete PA form 5 Performance appraisal meeting with supervisor 6 Update HR system/P-file on employee’s performance rating Head of department 11 Recommend employees for -promotion -increment 7 Submit completed PA form to HR Figure 4-2: Performance Management process map Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. Notify employees of promotion/ increment END 05 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK [A] DEVELOPING PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL FORMS Performance Appraisal Forms will be distributed at the start of the appraisal period to all employees. Management should be responsible for communicating the year’s appraisal cycle to set the appropriate tone for the importance of the appraisal exercise. The form typically comprises of the following information: Goals and objectives for the review period Process Owner: Leading Heads of Department (HODs) Supporting Human Resource Department (HR) Endorsing Management Comments and ratings on specific areas of responsibility and overall performance in relation to established outcomes and objectives Feedback on areas of concern performance improvement needed and Opportunities for employee development, including options for acquiring additional knowledge and skills to support career growth The ranking and grading system must be accompanied by clear definitions and guidelines on assigning grades in the appraisal forms. Please refer to A4.1 Guidelines on Conducting Performance Appraisal and A4.2 Performance Appraisal Methods for more information. Please refer to T4.1 Performance Appraisal Form (Executive) and T4.2 Performance Appraisal Form (Non-Executive) for samples. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 06 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK [B] DEFINING RESPONSIBILITIES Process Owner: Leading Human Resource Department (HR) Supporting Management HR is responsible for monitoring the performance appraisal process. They help to ensure that all employees have established performance goals and development plans, and are assessed objectively by their respective supervisors. HR should also conduct briefings and administer training on the performance management process for all Appraising Supervisors. A Management representative (e.g. CEO/MD/ GM) is responsible for communicating the business direction and corporate goals and also approves the performance management guidelines. Depending on the reporting structure of the company, Management may also be an Appraising Supervisor assigned to several managerial and key positions. This is particularly true for companies with relatively flat organisational structures. The HOD is responsible for assigning an Appraising Supervisor to each employee in his department to monitor individual performance. He needs to ensure that the performance management process is implemented in his department according to the guidelines approved by Management. The Appraising Supervisor will set an employee’s individual goals with him, provide ongoing feedback and coaching throughout the year and appraise the employee at the end of the appraisal period. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 07 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK Appraising Supervisors are usually the immediate supervisors of employees. A possible appraisal structure is as follows: APPRAISING SUPERVISORS LEVEL OF EMPLOYEE Director Managing Director / Chief Executive Officer Head of Department Director / General Manager Section/Team Leader Head of Department General employee Section / Team Leader Figure 4-3: Appraising Supervisors Both the employee and his Appraising Supervisor are responsible for setting individual goals. The employee is expected to proactively seek continuous feedback from his Appraising Supervisor and document achievements for discussions with the Appraising Supervisor. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 08 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK [C] DETERMINING APPRAISAL CYCLE The appraisal process is an on-going process that takes place throughout the year. This process consists of three stages as shown below: Goal Setting Process Owner: Leading Human Resource Department (HR) Supporting Heads of Department (HODs) Appraising Supervisor Appraisal Feedback Figure 4-4: Appraisal cycle Performance goal setting HR is responsible for initiating and communicating the annual appraisal cycle activities and timelines to the HODs. A briefing session can be conducted to educate the HODs and the Appraising Supervisors on the procedures. The employee and his Appraising Supervisor will be responsible for discussing and setting goals at the start of each appraisal cycle. Individual performance goals take into consideration performance expectations and developmental goals of the individual employee. Performance expectations are drawn from the company and departmental objectives, and job-level expectations. HODs should ensure that an employee’s performance goals are aligned to departmental and company goals and objectives. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 09 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK Performance expectations must be communicated to all employees in writing to achieve the following: Setting of expectations on job performance by Management Better understanding of the level of expectations by the employee Fostering an open and trusting relationship between employees and Management Increased job satisfaction because employees know when they have performed tasks well Some examples of performance objectives are: Reduce customer complaints by 50% within the first half of the year Submit bank reconciliation report for all current accounts within 5 days of receipt of bank statements Secure at least 10 new customer accounts by the end of the first quarter of the fiscal year Increase sales team revenue by 25% within a year Reduce attrition rate by 10% for (year) compared to previous year Goal setting for the upcoming year may overlap with the last stage of the previous appraisal process. Individual performance goals, standards and expectations for the new appraisal cycle can be summarised and incorporated into the Performance Appraisal Form. Please refer to A4.4 Recommended Target Setting Measures and for examples of possible competency measures for job positions (e.g. Administrative, Technical, Managerial). Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 10 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK As a best practice, HR should also advise managers to keep records of an employee’s performance (positive and negative) throughout the year to be used for discussion during the appraisal exercise. Examples of positive and negative performance are: P EXAM LE 1 Positive – Receiving customers for good compliments from service rendered 2 Negative – Obtaining traffic summons while on delivery runs Managers should also be advised to consistently provide performance feedback to employees. Please refer to A4.6 Guidelines for Writing Performance Objectives for step-by-step instructions. Feedback The HODs is responsible for ensuring that the Appraising Supervisor provide ongoing and informal feedback to an individual employee’s performance before a formal appraisal is conducted. Informal feedback opportunities arise regularly during day-to-day operations. Using the individual performance and development goals set at the beginning of the year, the Appraising Supervisors can provide support and guidance to his employee through coaching. Coaching is a feedback tool that focuses on identifying specific positive performance or area for improvement instead of the overall performance review that takes place during an appraisal discussion. Observation of specific performance or behaviour that is commendable or requires improvement should be clearly communicated to employees. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 11 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK The Appraising Supervisor should engage his employee in identifying factors that contribute to his performance. When providing coaching to improve performance, engaging employees in problem solving by asking questions and listening with a non-judgmental attitude is important. Obta ining traffi HODs and Appraising Supervisors should regard c sum mon while s feedback and coaching sessions as a method of deliv ering enhancing communication, building trust and an it em c enhancing the esteem of employees. These sessions lassi fies as n e should be used to reinforce the value of the gativ e perfo employees’ contributions to achieving the goals rman ce. of the department or to suggest specific actions to correct undesirable performance and behaviour. Performance appraisal HR is responsible for initiating the annual appraisal process for all regular employees and the appraisal of probationary employees for confirmation purposes. Please refer to T4.1 Performance Appraisal Form (Executive) and T4.2 Performance Appraisal Form (Non-Executive) when undertaking the confirmation appraisal process. The annual performance appraisal will focus on: Achievements and performance for the current year Areas done well and areas that require improvement Development plan for the following year Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 12 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK Annual Performance Appraisal [D] CONDUCTING APPRAISAL DISCUSSION Process Owner: Leading Appraising Supervisors Supporting Employees The employee and his Appraising Supervisor should decide on a date, time and venue for the appraisal discussion. Prior to an appraisal discussion, the employee should complete relevant sections of the appraisal form by documenting his achievements for the year as well as identifying possible development needs and career aspirations. The Appraising Supervisor prepares for the appraisal discussion by consolidating feedback from the employee and completing the appropriate sections in the appraisal form. The Appraising Supervisor must be able to provide supporting examples on his appraisee’s achievements and details to show where the appraisee has not done well in. Please refer to T4.1 Performance Appraisal Form (Executive) and T4.2 Performance Appraisal Form (Non-Executive) for a sample. The appraisal discussion should focus on the following: Purpose of the discussion Goals achieved and areas for improvement Development opportunities and career aspirations Next year’s goals (if both are ready to discuss them) Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 13 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK Some good practices recommended for Appraising Supervisors during the appraisal discussion are: Show interest in the employee’s overall progress Acknowledge good performance Give specific feedback on performance Be empathetic to the employee’s challenges on the job Offer specific assistance to the employee where necessary The appraisal discussion ends with the Appraising Supervisor giving an overall performance rating and developing an action plan. Performance improvement plan When a manager believes that an employee is not meeting the job expectations set for him, it is advised that a performance improvement meeting be conducted. This meeting will involve the employee and his supervisor for the verbal and the first written warning. The findings and contents of discussion with the employee will be documented and sent to HR who will update the employee’s Personnel File. HR will be involved for the subsequent meetings (second written warning, third written warning and termination where necessary). When there is a large gap between the expected performance level and the actual performance delivered, there may be a need to issue the first written warning to the employee, instead of providing a verbal warning. Please refer to T4.3 Performance Improvement Plan for more information. Please refer to A4.5 Guidelines for Crafting a Performance Improvement Plan for more information. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 14 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK The Appraisal Supervisor is responsible for documenting the action plans pertaining to the results of the appraisal of all employees evaluated during the performance appraisal exercise. [E] DEVELOPING ACTION PLAN Process Owner: Leading Heads of Department (HODs) Supporting Appraising Supervisor Human Resource Department (HR) The recommended actions below may be included in the action plan, where appropriate. EXAM PLE Examples of these actions are: 1 Performance bonus 2 Promotion 3 Incentives and privileges 4 Recognition programmes 5 Informal encouragement 6 Stretch projects (giving employee the opportunity to undertake a project that would allow him/ her to derive new competencies or to deepen knowledge of an area)^ 7 Secondment/attachment to another country or subsidiary^ 8 Scholarship^ 9 Inclusion to high potential programmes^ 10 Learning and Development programmes^ Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 15 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK 11 Mentoring^ 12 Coaching 13 Counselling* 14 Performance warning* 15 Demotion* 16 Reduction or withholding of performance bonus* ^ Please refer to A7.3 Talent Management and Development for further examples. This can be found in Talent Management and Succession Planning Module. * The recommended actions above, with the exception of the last five items, can be used to reward and reinforce good performance. The last five items may be used to address specific performance improvement areas. An employee may be recommended for promotion to give recognition for his expanded work scope or changes in duties or responsibilities that are more challenging and complex. The new job profile would usually require a higher level of knowledge, skills, and abilities to carry out those responsibilities. The following are some possible criteria that may be used to evaluate an employee’s readiness for promotion: Demonstration of sustained positive performance since the last appointment or promotion as reflected in performance appraisals; Demonstration of sustained achievements of key objectives of the employee’s role/job consistent to the company’s mission and core values; and Demonstration of potential to take on higher responsibilities. Please refer to T4.5 Letter of Promotion for a sample. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 16 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK The HODs ensures that the appraisal is conducted according to guidelines and signs off on the Performance Appraisal Form when he concurs with the results of the performance appraisal. Performance scores are summarised for every department on the Performance Ranking Sheet and submitted to HR together with the completed Performance Appraisal Forms of all employees in the department. Performers are ranked according to guidelines approved by Management. Please refer to A4.6 Guidelines on Writing Performance Objectives and T4.4 Performance Ranking for more information. If required, HR will consolidate the company-wide performance score ranking and communicate it to all employees to give a general perspective of how the employees have performed in this exercise cycle (compared to previous years). Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 17 Appendices Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL A4.1 Guidelines on Conducting Performance Appraisal - Why performance appraisals are important - Definition of ranking and grading system (sample) - Common pitfalls in conducting performance appraisals - Tips for Appraising Supervisors in conducting the appraisal discussion - Documentation record keeping Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 19 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL Why performance appraisals are important Performance appraisals are necessary for the following reasons: 1 Provide a review of past work performance and create the opportunity to develop new performance goals. 2 Establish lines of communication on employee performance. 3 Create an opportunity to discuss professional development goals and objectives. 4 Document employee performance and provide support for merit increases, promotions, or terminations. 5 Document corrective action necessary to improve work performance. Definition of ranking and grading system (sample) A grading system specifies the performance standards and is used to assess an employee’s performance level. A clearly defined grading system ensures that all employees are measured with the same yardstick. w an e i v To f the o e l p exam tem, s y s ng grad i d ing! a e r on keep Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 20 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL EXAMPLE OF STEM GRADING SY The following grading system is an example which a company can adopt: Outstanding: Consistently exceeds expectations “Outstanding” shows competence well above the needs/requirements of the current grade. It indicates an employee has the capacity and capability to perform beyond his level. Very good: Exceeds most expectations “Very good” indicates an employee is performing above the required performance level for his grade. Good: Consistently meets expectations “Good” indicates that an employee is fully competent to handle the requirements of the job in his current grade. Some developmental action may be required for other jobs at the same level. Average: Does not meet some expectations “Average” indicates that an employee has not met some of the goals during the year. The employee has some areas for improvement. Development/training or other follow-up action is necessary. Needs improvement: Performance is unsatisfactory “Needs improvement” suggests that an employee will be put on a performance improvement plan. Please refer to A4.5 Guidelines for Crafting a Performance Improvement Plan and T4.3 Performance Improvement Plan for more information. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 21 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL Common pitfalls in conducting performance appraisals E H T R O F S R E POINT APPRAISERS Following are pointers for appraisers when preparing for the performance appraisal process: The “Halo effect” is the tendency to rate the employee based on the overall impression of the work, but avoiding or ignoring smaller problem areas that need attention. Continuous documentation over the course of the appraisal period can assist the Appraising Supervisor in writing the evaluation. The “Recency effect” is the tendency to rate the employee based on a recent event, either positive or negative. Evaluations are for employee’s performance over the entire time period indicated and continuous documentation of performance can help the Appraising Supervisor avoid focusing on a recent event. “Stereotyping” is a preconceived perception of the employee. Appraising Supervisors need to be aware of their perceptions and biases, and avoid these when preparing a written appraisal. “Comparing” is when Appraising Supervisors compare an employee’s performance with another employee of the same team with a different job scope without considering the differences of each individual. One way to avoid this is to write evaluations for employees based on his performance objectives, which will allow the Appraising Supervisor to focus on the individual rather than a group of employees. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 22 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL POINTERS FOR APPRAISERS THE “Mirroring” is the tendency for people to favour people much like themselves. This tendency carries over into the workplace and during the performance appraisal period. Appraising Supervisors may have difficulty evaluating and appreciating the differences that others bring to the workplace. Appraising Supervisors may rate the employee most like themselves higher than those who are different. It is important for the Appraising Supervisor to consider the work performance of each employee and avoid favouritism. Appraising Supervisors want to “avoid being the bad guy”. They avoid writing negative evaluations because they fear it will reflect badly on themselves as Appraising Supervisors if an employee is not performing up to expectations, or they prefer not to “upset” the employee with negative feedback. The effect of this tendency is that employees will not know where they may need to improve their work performance or behaviour. By providing this information in a constructive manner, the Appraising Supervisor is helping the individual become a better employee. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 23 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL Tips for Appraising Supervisors in conducting the appraisal discussion Welcome the employee; put the employee at ease. Let the employee start: Listen and take notes Maintain attentive posture Ask questions or clarify points, if necessary, to check for understanding of what the employee said Be non-judgmental Compare the actual specific performance results and behaviour to performance expectations. Refer to the “Goals and objectives for this review period” portion of the Performance Appraisal Form. Use the performance and development plans as a reference. Achievements and performance for the current year may include the following aspects: Demonstration of initiative/pro-activeness High performance/ under-performance Changes to productivity levels Contributions to overall company performance Commitment to the company or project Contribution to an improved working environment Relationships with colleagues Keep the appraisal open for the employee to provide their input. Ask the employee for ideas on how to resolve problems. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 24 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON CONDUCTING PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL Focus on the work done in the past year of the appraisal. Reinforce good performance, emphasise strengths. Identify areas that need improvement. Be honest and be prepared to discuss sensitive issues. employee’s effort to improve. Support the Set goals, expectations and other considerations together with the employee for the next appraisal cycle. Discuss developmental the employee. opportunities and action plans with The Appraising Supervisor endorses the written appraisal by signing on the Performance Appraisal Form. Signing the appraisal does not necessarily mean that the employee agrees with the appraisal. The signature means that the appraisal has been shared with the employee, and that the employee understands the appraisal results. In the instance where the employee does not agree with the appraisal, he can provide a written response on the appraisal form. Summarise the session and end on a positive note. Documentation record keeping The Appraising Supervisor should retain the Performance Appraisal Form. The Performance Appraisal Form and any supporting documents are to be forwarded to HR for filing in the Personnel File. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 25 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL METHODS A4.2 Performance D Appraisal methods The following types of appraisals listed below are listed according to the level of openness and transparency during the appraisal process (lowest to highest) Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 26 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL METHODS L A S I A R P P A D E CLOS CONFIDENTIAL REPORTS • This is an appraisal prepared by the employee’s Appraising Supervisor where he highlights the employee’s strengths and weaknesses in performance over the past year. • In this instance, the employee will not get to view the feedback provided by his Appraising Supervisor. • The inherent weakness of using this appraisal method is that the feedback on the report prepared is not provided to the employee concerned because every report is kept confidential. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 27 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL METHODS SEMI-OPEN AP PRAISAL SEMI-OPEN PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL • An appraisal is conducted between the employee and his Appraising Supervisor. • The Appraising Supervisor will speak to the employee about qualitative aspects of the appraisal exercise; to discuss goals and objectives for review period, duties/projects undertaken, summary of strengths/areas for improvement. Please refer to T4.1 Performance Appraisal Form (Executive) or T4.2 Performance Appraisal Form (Non-Executive). • Employee may be asked to rate his performance. This may or may not be similar to the final score that the Appraising Supervisor assigns to the employee. • The Appraising Supervisor will then fill up the scores relative to the performance of the employee after the face-to-face exercise and submit it to HR. • Such an approach is beneficial in that it would allow the employee to share his achievements for the year and perceived developmental needs. The Appraising Supervisor will also be able to give a final quantitative rating for the employee without having to justify any reason for giving a particular score. • This format might be perceived by employees as not sufficiently objective as the employee is unable to understand his final grade/score. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 28 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL METHODS L– A OPEN APPRAIS F O L E V E L G N I S BY INCREA Y TRANSPARENC SUPERVISOR – LED APPRAISAL 1 • An appraisal is conducted between the employee and his Appraising Supervisor. • The Appraising Supervisor sends completed appraisal to the Head of Department for consolidation. • The Head of Department will review and endorse all appraisals done for the department and sends forms to HR. • This appraisal format may however be prone to subjectivity as feedback is principally from one single supervisor (although less than closed appraisal). 2 APPRAISAL WITH RANKING EXERCISE • An appraisal is conducted between the employee and his Appraising Supervisor. • The Appraising Supervisor sends completed appraisal to the Head of Department for consolidation. • All Heads of Departments will sit together with the completed reviews for the purpose of categorising individuals into the categories of “Outstanding”, “Competent” and “Needs Improvement”. A bell curve system may be put in place in order to force-rank all individuals at the same level to a particular category (e.g. all managers will be ranked). Please refer to A4.3 Guidelines on Moderating Performance Ratings for more information. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 29 30 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL METHODS • HR will be in charge of facilitating the moderation and ranking exercise. • This is seen as a fairer open appraisal system as employees are now graded against peers in the same level. Management will also be able to provide a consistent guide to how all employees are graded. TARGET SETTING 3 Pre-requisite: In order to use this method, the company’s vision, mission and objectives have to be communicated and made known to all employees prior to conducting the appraisal • This style of performance appraisal requires a manager and employee to agree upon specific, obtainable objectives with a set deadline at the start of each year. • For example, a HR Manager may be tasked to improve the employee satisfaction score to at least 75% in the annual employee perception survey. Once this goal is set, the responsibility is on the HR manager to direct himself/herself towards the objective. • Some of the benefits include the ease in determining success failure, motivation for the employee, additional empowerment (the employee has a role in setting his own targets) and well aligned objectives for the company and its employees. • Some limitations include over-emphasising the setting of objectives, neglecting core and functional competencies for the development of the employee and the inability to plan training interventions as there may not be clear indicators of the employee’s weaknesses. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL METHODS 360 DEGREE 4 Pre-requisite: The company should have spent a good amount of time on previous methods of appraisal, with an open company culture in place and where constructive feedback is received and acted upon. • In a 360 Degree appraisal system, employees are able to appraise their employers, peers and employees under their charge. • For this method of performance appraisal, employees get a broad perspective of how they are perceived by others and how they impact others positively and negatively. This encourages open feedback and is perceived as more valid and objective. • This appraisal style fosters a climate of continuous improvement and focuses on the identification of key development areas for the employee, the team or the company as a whole. • On an interpersonal level, gaps are identified between employee’s self-perception versus the perception of manager, peers or direct reports. On the downside, there is also a possibility that emotions can be in play (e.g. negative review from a superior towards his employee may result in the employee providing an unfavourable rating in a 360 degree review, a popular employee getting a more favourable rating than an employee who is a better performer but may not be as socially engaging with the rest of the team). Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 31 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON MODERATING PERFORMANCE RATINGS A4.3 Guidelines on moderating Performance De ratings Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 32 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON MODERATING PERFORMANCE RATINGS The forced distribution method is a concept commonly used in moderating the performance rating process where employees are rated against each other. When different departments or business groups within the same company have largely differing employee performance ratings, an equalisation exercise may be undertaken where median performance ratings are aligned. This method establishes a bell curve to distribute employee performance ratings into high, normal and low rating categories. For example, the normal rating category can consist of the 75-80% of employees who are in the “Satisfactory” to the “Good” range. High rating category can be 1015% that represents the employees who are rated as “Outstanding” and “Very good”. The remaining 5-10% is the low rating group of performers who “Need improvement”. Figure 4-5: The bell curve Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved.   33 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON MODERATING PERFORMANCE RATINGS HR and Management should be aware of the advantages and disadvantages in using the forced distribution method. Some of these are as follows: CONS PROS Guide to Management on how to rate employees, prevent managers from overrating employees Criticised for being biased Manage the total bonus payout sum Subjective (the poor performers in some teams could be the better performers in other teams. This may lead to displacement or reduction of employees who may not be poor performers) Help managers identify bottom performers in the team Not suitable for companies with a small employee base as they will deem every co-worker as a competitor, and hold back collaboration opportunities Figure 4-6: Pros and cons of the forced distribution method Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 34 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON MODERATING PERFORMANCE RATINGS To minimise the issues faced when using of the forced distribution method, the following should be taken into consideration by HR and Management: Use clear and appraisal system. objective parameters for the performance Appraising Supervisors should keep HR in the loop at each step of the performance appraisal cycle. Focus on performance improvement efforts; counsel the employee regarding his poor performance and allow him to explain. Shift the onus of improvement onto the employee and offer assistance if needed. Follow up with employee’s performance and development frequently. Document all performance-related conversations with employee to gather important evidence. The information is important when considering terminating an employee’s service. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 35 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON MODERATING PERFORMANCE RATINGS Procedures to implement the forced distribution method S T E P Collate a list for each department/rank, indicating initial performance ratings as per Performance Appraisal Form. Rank all employees according to performance (1: top performer, 20: worst performer). The ranking should be in line with the appraisal discussions, which compares employees against one another. E L P M A S Figure 4-7: Implementing the forced distribution method (Step 1) Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved.   36 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON MODERATING PERFORMANCE RATINGS S T E P Calculate the current number/proportion of employees in each performance rating. E L P M A S Figure 4-8: Implementing the forced distribution method (Step 2) Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved.   37 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON MODERATING PERFORMANCE RATINGS S T E P Input the desired number/proportion of employees in each performance rating. E L P M A S Figure 4-9: Implementing the forced distribution method (Step 3) Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved.   38 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON MODERATING PERFORMANCE RATINGS S T E P According to the rank given to each employee, reassign ratings to employees, in accordance with desired number (i.e. 3 “outstanding”, etc). E PL M A S Figure 4-10: Implementing the forced distribution method (Step 4) S T E P Present moderated performance ratings to Management for concurrence. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved.   39 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON MODERATING PERFORMANCE RATINGS S T E P Determine bonus payout amount based on initial and adjusted individual performance ratings. E L P M A S Figure 4-11: Implementing the forced distribution method (Step 6)   S T E P Finalise performance ratings and bonus payout amount and seek the approval of Management. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 40 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - RECOMMENDED TARGET SETTING MEASURES 41 A4.4 Recommended Target Setting Measures When deciding on the measures to use to set targets for specific job positions, it is important to ensure that the measures are SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, result-focused and time-bound). Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - RECOMMENDED TARGET SETTING MEASURES The list below shows possible measures for specific job families that may be used within a performance appraisal: ROLE Technical TARGET SETTING MEASURES Productivity: - Ability to complete production (xx quantity of item within x days/ weeks/ months) - Time spent producing per unit should be under xx hours/minutes - Ensure less than xx hours of downtime per production line per day/week/month Adherence to Safety Standards: - xx of days spent with no incidents/fatalities - less than xx non-adherence cases per safety audit Processing Time: - Time taken to process and approve each form is less than xx minutes/hours - Less than x number of errors per document processed Administrative Transactional Efficiency: - Calls answered per hour (for call center or shared service type employees) - Picking up the phone within x rings - Respond to customer queries/complaints within x working days Project Management: - Project KPI met (meet budget, timeline, manage stakeholders) - Meet Service Level Agreement (SLA) set by client x% of the time Managerial Financial Targets: - Meet revenue targets - Meet cost targets Supervisory Role: - Employee turnover stays below x% for department - Capital Expenditure or Operating Expenditure for business unit not exceeding set budget - Meet profitability targets Administrative Targets: - Meet x% of revenue target - Meet x% of revenue from recurring accounts - Obtain x number of new accounts Service Levels: - Obtain client satisfaction score of x.xx - Meet all clients within portfolio xx times per quarter/year Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 42 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES FOR CRAFTING A PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PLAN 43 A4.5 Guidelines for Crafting a Performance improvement PLAN A Performance Improvement Plan should not take place only during the Annual Performance Appraisal Cycle, but should be used for intervention as and when required to correct the employee’s performance/behaviour as soon as possible. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES FOR CRAFTING A PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PLAN 44 UNDERSTAND THE AREAS O F WEAKNESS Evaluate the current shortcoming(s) of the employee to ascertain areas that require improvement; determine if the weakness is due to internal factors (attributable to self) or external factors (e.g. training, equipment used, support provided by team members). OYEE EMPL H IT W S S E N K A S OF WE DISCUSS AREA Have a frank discussion with the employee to have him explain the reasons behind his unsatisfactory performance. Ask the employee what type of support (in terms of training or tools) can be provided in order for him to improve. DRAFT AN AC TION PLAN Determine a positive action plan for the employee. Do up an action plan for the employee that inculcates SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, results-focused and time-bound) elements. Share the plan with the employee and obtain his agreement regarding the measures listed. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES FOR CRAFTING A PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PLAN 45 HING E COAC ID V O R P D N A S OGRES MONITOR PR Provide positive feedback for items done well alongside any negative feedback. Ensure that there is a fixed and regular number of hours spent per week to answer any queries that the employee might have while trying to correct the weaknesses identified at the start; document discussions if necessary. REVIEW AND DECIDE IF FU RTHER ACTIO N IS REQUIRED Should there be an improvement in the employee’s level of work standard within the targeted time frame, no further action needs to be taken. If the employee is still unable to perform up to the expected standard, his line manager may choose to discuss with HR on possibility of internal transfers (for those with a good attitude), counsel, or even terminate the employee. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES FOR CRAFTING A PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PLAN 46 Recommended course of action to undertake for a Performance Improvement Plan*: ACTIVITIES TO UNDERTAKE - Record areas where there are shortcomings - Conduct meeting with employee Verbal Warning - Contents of discussion with employee should be documented and sent to HR to be kept in the employee’s Personnel File - Obtain employee’s comments on the shortcomings - Agree upon action plan for improvement with employee (include SMART elements) - Record areas where there are shortcomings and comment on how progress has not met expected standards since last verbal warning session (input date and details of warning session(s)) First Written Warning - Conduct meeting with employee (HR presence optional) - Obtain employee’s comments on the highlighted shortcomings - Agree upon action plan for improvement with employee (include SMART elements) - Contents of discussion should be documented within employee’s Personnel file - Record area where there are shortcomings, provide a short description where required and comment on how progress has not met expected standards since verbal warning and first warning session (input date and details of warning session(s)) Second Written Warning - Conduct meeting with employee (HR presence compulsory) - Obtain employee’s comments on the shortcomings - Agree upon action plan for improvement with employee (include SMART elements) - Contents of discussion should be documented within employee’s Personnel file Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES FOR CRAFTING A PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PLAN 47 ACTIVITIES TO UNDERTAKE - Record area where current shortcoming is seen, provide a short description where required and comments on how progress has not met expected standards since last warning session (input date and details of warning session(s)) Final Written Warning - Conduct meeting with employee (HR presence compulsory) - Obtain employee’s comments on the highlighted shortcomings - Agree upon action plan for improvement with employee (include SMART elements) - Contents of discussion should be documented within employee’s Personnel file *In the event of a major misconduct by the employee, , the regular procedure need not be followed prior to dismissal without a need for a Performance Improvement Plan. Examples of major misconduct may include theft of company property, subjecting coworkers to racial abuse, fights, drinking on the job etc. Please refer to A8.4 Guidelines on Implementing Disciplinary Procedures, T8.5 Letter of Warning and T8.6 Disciplinary Warning Form for more information. This can be found in Employee Relations Module. It is important for Management to follow the procedures in place for their Performance Improvement Plan, because if an employee has been dismissed unfairly, it can damage the company’s reputation. In such a case, if an employee feels he has been unfairly dismissed, he can file for an appeal with MOM to be reinstated to his former employment. Please refer to A8.3 Guidelines on Grievance Handling Procedures for more information. This can be found in Employee Relations Module. More information on misconduct can be found on MOM’s website. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON WRITING PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES A4.6 Guidelines on writing Performance objectives Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 48 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON WRITING PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES The guidelines below outline the steps to be taken by an employee in writing performance objectives S T E P List all the jobs and tasks that need to be performed for the role on a regular basis, no matter how large or small. Do not worry about grouping them together in similar categories at this point. Taking note of such tasks over a one or two week period may help with this step. Group the items listed into broad categories/headings. The number of categories will be dependent on the individual’s role at work. S T E P Consult the Appraising Supervisor and list down the knowledge and skills required for the job. Refer to the list created in Step 1 to complete this section. S T E P The Appraising Supervisor will list the department objectives. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 49 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON WRITING PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES S T E P List individual performance goals and objectives: Examine each category/heading accomplished in step 1 and the department’s performance objectives in step 3. The categories become the employers’ objectives by answering “What do I need to deliver or achieve?” Under each objective, list the activities that need to be undertaken to meet the objectives. Look at each objective and ask “What activities will I concentrate on during the period of the plan that will achieve the desired outcome?” There may be a number of tasks and actions that will need to be undertaken to achieve the outcome. When adding objectives, care should be taken that only realistically achievable objectives are included. The objectives will be finalised and agreed by the Appraising Supervisor, in line with his workplace priorities. Examine each objective and the activities that relate to it and ask “How do I, or my Head of Department (HOD), know when the task is accomplished to a satisfactory level?” or “How can I measure the quality and completion of the task and objective?” A number of measurement tools may be used for each outcome and objectives. These measurement tools will act as the “Performance Measures” for the performance plan. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 50 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON WRITING PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES S T E P Once the plan has been created and discussed with the Appraising Supervisor, the individual should concentrate on asking “What training or experience do I need to meet my performance targets?” and “What training, experience or development opportunities are available to me to meet the future needs of the company and my career?” The Appraising Supervisor and HODs can help the employee explore development needs and opportunities. S T E P Use and review the performance and development plan. The plan should be a live document and updated whenever the need arises. If the individual’s position or role changes, it should be discussed with the Appraising Supervisor and changes should be made to the plan. Informal feedback should occur several times before the formal appraisal. Ideally the employee and his Appraising Supervisor will create the plan together. The plan must be agreed between the employee and his Appraising Supervisor during the discussion which should include issues such as workload and development needs. Both the employee and the Appraising Supervisor should retain a copy of the plan. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 51 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON TERMINATING NON-PERFORMING EMPLOYEES A4.7 Guidelines on terminating non-performing employees The following guidelines assist HR to execute tasks related to termination of employment due to non-performance of duties and responsibilities. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 52 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON TERMINATING NON-PERFORMING EMPLOYEES HR schedules a termination meeting that includes the employee, Appraising Supervisor, and Head of Department (HOD). Inform the employee that his job or service is terminated, according to the notice period for termination of contract. Be civil, concise, and compassionate. The notice period to be given for the termination of contract depends on what is agreed in the contract or employment letter. The length of the notice period must be the same for both parties. If no notice period is previously agreed or included in the contract or employment letter, the notice period indicated in Section 10 of the Employment Act can be used as a reference. Allow the employee to speak, if he wants to. The Appraising Supervisor may wish to share his perspective leading to the termination. EXAM PLE An example of some reasons for termination: The employee was not a good “fit” for his role from the start, the employee’s work style was too slow for the pace of the company, or the employee had become bored of his work. Do not give the employee the impression that the termination decision is not final. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 53 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - GUIDELINES ON TERMINATING NON-PERFORMING EMPLOYEES The employee may lose control of his emotions upon receiving notice of his termination. Avoid getting into an argument with the employee and make sure that emotions are kept under control. Advise employee on his strengths and the type of job he may succeed in and suggest some resources to aid in his search for a new job. In cases of immediate termination, the employee will be informed about removing his personal belongings from his work station immediately or after office hours. Complete the employee exit procedures found in Employee Relations Module. Please refer to A8.4 Guidelines on Implementing Employee Exit Procedures and T8.2 Letter of Termination for more information. This can be found in Employee Relations Module. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 54 case stories Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. Heatec JieTong Pte Ltd Fast Facts • Year of Incorporation: 1990, listed in 2009 • Staff Strength: 800-900 • Industry Focus: Precision Engineering & Marine • Sales Turnover: S$20-S$50 Million Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - CASE STORIES 57 Heatec JieTong Pte Ltd Background of company Prior to the usage of the Toolkit, there were Heatec Jietong Pte Ltd (Heatec) has also no appraisal system and subsequent two core businesses in its portfolio – benchmarking in place. As a result, there Heat Exchanger and Piping. Originally were numerous complaints in the past a marine industry focused company, about biasness in performance appraisal Heatec has now expanded into the Oil exercises and Gas Industry. Heatec prides itself increments for management employees. on being a family oriented and managed For business. Listed in 2009, the company offsite, there were no proper records aims to be more corporate, but seeks and benchmarking in place for them to maintain its family like environment at as well. As a result, it was only the same time. possible to have the and their corresponding general workers pay based supervisors provide a simple grading system for Before Heatec implemented the HR each employee, and subsequently HR Capability evaluation would provide an increment based and disbursement of pay increments on the performance grade accorded. Toolkit, their were done on the anniversary from the employment date of the employee. Putting in This was a laborious task for the HR performance management system department, as they would have to After their introduction to the HR track in advance on a monthly basis to Capability Toolkit, Heatec was able to determine the list of employees due for a customize and adopt the templates and pay increment for that month. In addition, guidelines to suit its company’s needs. this process was also extremely informal For its management employees, the with HR providing an execution role company has adopted an E-Appraisal based on the manager’s request. system whereby HR’s role is to drive each Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. place a structured PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - CASE STORIES 58 year’s appraisal exercise by being the Positive impact administrator for its system. A form on implementation the system will be created with the names The implementation of new systems, of the employee and appraiser. This form together will then be sent to the Appraiser to rate guidelines provided in the HR Capability the employee under his charge. When Toolkit have enabled Heatec to perform the form has been completed by both a more objective performance appraisal the employee and the Appraiser, the exercise across different levels and form would automatically be sent back departments within the company. This to HR, with an email response being sent has resulted in a reduction of conflicts to the employee for acknowledgement. and with the from templates misunderstandings the and between managers and employees, and has led For their general workers, Heatec made to an overall improvement in employee use of the grading system recommended morale and productivity. While turnover within Toolkit. rates have not changed significantly, Employees are now first graded by their employees have displayed an increase in supervisor, who will subsequently pass motivation. Employees are willing to stay on the file to the Operations Manager for a longer period with the company, as for review before submission to HR. they now feel that a proper Performance The company has also invested in a HR Management system is in place. the HR Capability management system whereby personal details of the general workers such as demerit points for absenteeism without reason will be flagged up. The additional round of checks done by HR allowed them to verify the scores provided by their supervisors, which helped to ensure that the appraisal was conducted without bias. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. QSS Safety Products (S) Pte Ltd Fast Facts: • • • • Year of Incorporation: 1988 Staff Strength: 55 Industry Focus: Trading Sales Turnover: Undisclosed Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - CASE STORIES 60 qss safety products (s) pte ltd Background of company improvement measures and actions QSS Safety Products (S) Pte Ltd (QSS) flagged out after this annual exercise. specialises in providing a comprehensive Bonuses range of Personal Protective Equipment provided at the recommendation of the and Quality Safety Solutions in Singapore. Heads of Departments, and were based They Equipment on the available bonus pool without a Manufacturer (OEM) of their own in- company-wide moderation of results. are the Original to employees were also house brands, and are also distributors of other global safety products. QSS In addition, warnings were only verbal also provides consultancy and training in nature for cases of bad performance services or non-adherence to company policy. to enhance and improve workplace safety. Being a progressive company, it is part of QSS’s culture to be Better linkage between vocal and proactive in learning. It is also performance and compensation currently a member of a management After undertaking a consultancy project association which allows them to share under the HR Capability Program, QSS and learn new management techniques. is currently using the Performance Appraisal Form and linking it to each Prior to implementation and use of the HR department’s Capability Toolkit, QSS’s performance purposes. For cases of non-compliance management program was more a to company policy or under-performing documentation exercise with little follow- staff members, a letter is now issued to up action beyond a bonus payout to the employee and a duplicate copy is employees. There were no performance filed in the employee’s personnel file. Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. KPI for goal setting PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT - CASE STORIES In addition, QSS has also started appraisals received throughout the year providing staff members with a company- (HOD Evaluation, Self-Evaluation, CEO’s wide bonus, and a Personal Achievement Observation), will allow the individual to Bonus in 2011. This is done by allocating a constantly receive feedback on how to sum of money for individual performance act on his highlighted shortcomings. bonuses at the start of the year if the company makes a profit. After By being progressive in HR practices the performance review exercise, the and in sustaining an excellent culture completed Appraisal of continuous learning, QSS is able to Forms are given to the Board of further evolve their HR System from a Directors for moderation and evaluation basic to a more comprehensive and before deciding on any pay increment or integrated system to assist the business. Performance promotion for the employee. Should an individual not meet individual performance benchmarks for work done during the year, he will receive a smaller quantum of the bonus payout. This step, along with the formal and informal Copyright © 2012 SPRING Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation. All rights reserved. 61
GSP187 Performance Management (Practice) Tutor-Marked Assignment 01 January 2019 Presentation GSP187 Tutor-Marked Assignment 01 TUTOR-MARKED ASSIGNMENT 01 (TMA01) This assignment is worth 50% of the final mark for GSP187: Performance Management (Practice). The cut-off date for this assignment is 2355hours on 25 Feb 2019. Submit your solution document in the form of a single MS Word file on or before the cut-off date shown above. Additional instructions: 1. You will need to indicate clearly on the front page your name, student ID, course title and assignment number. 2. You are to use the report template stated below for your TMA submission. 3. You must document all information that you use from another source, or you will be penalised severely. If you copy from the work of another student, regardless of the course or programme, you will be severely penalised. You are not permitted to re-use material from past assignments whether in part or in full. All of the above actions can result in your failing the TMA. _________________________________________________________________________________ Scope TMA01 tests your ability to:   Identify the challenges, benefits and concerns in implementing and aligning performance management systems with other Human Resource Systems in an organisation. Examine effective approaches for implementing an appraisal system through implementation plan. SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) Page 2 of 4 GSP187 Tutor-Marked Assignment 01 WORKPLACE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT REPORT Describe performance management planning and performance appraisal in the context of your organisation. Evaluate the problems that are related to performance management at your workplace. Explain your findings for these above problems that are related to performance management. Applying the Human Resource Toolkit to evaluate competencies in your organisation, what are your recommendations for addressing the problems and how will you apply your implementation plan? Demonstrate your understanding by setting goals for performance that are aligned to your organisation’s strategic objectives. Total: 100 marks Guidance Notes for Students You are required to use the template below to write a report of up to 1500 words, ARIAL font size 12, Spacing 1.5 in response to ALL the following questions: Your report should adhere to the following format and address the points listed below:  Background information of your workplace  Current situation (identifying workplace performance management problems)  Analysis of problems  Main findings  Recommendations and critical success factors  Implementation plan (timeline and involvements of relevant stakeholders) – You can use these learning resources: Spring Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation’s (SNEF) Performance Management Framework and Process Map You must use proper referencing and citation formats where applicable. Remember to use accurate grammar, correct sentence structures and a tone appropriate to academic writing. Marks will be deducted for poor English. SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) Page 3 of 4 GSP187 Tutor-Marked Assignment 01 ---- END OF ASSIGNMENT ---- SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) Page 4 of 4
GSP187 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT (PRACTICE) STUDY GUIDE (2.5CU) Course Development Team Head of Programme : Dr Regina Lee Course Developer : Mr Koh Gim Han Henry Production : Educational Technology & Production Team © 2017 Singapore University of Social Sciences. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced in any form or by any means without permission in writing from the Educational Technology & Production, Singapore University of Social Sciences. Educational Technology & Production Singapore University of Social Sciences 461 Clementi Road Singapore 599491 Version 1.2 CONTENTS COURSE GUIDE 1. Welcome .................................................................................................................1 2. Course Description and Aims .............................................................................1 3. Learning Outcomes .............................................................................................. 3 4. Learning Material .................................................................................................3 5. Assessment Overview .......................................................................................... 4 6. Course Schedule ....................................................................................................5 7. Learning Mode ......................................................................................................5 STUDY UNIT 1 INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Learning Outcomes ......................................................................................... SU1-1 Overview ........................................................................................................... SU1-2 Chapter 1 Purpose of Performance Management ...................................... SU1-5 Chapter 2 Performance Management Framework ..................................... SU1-8 STUDY UNIT 2 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT PLANNING Learning Outcomes ......................................................................................... SU2-1 Overview ........................................................................................................... SU2-2 Chapter 1 Identifying and Measuring Performance ................................... SU2-3 Chapter 2 Performance Appraisal ............................................................... SU2-10 STUDY UNIT 3 APPLICATION OF PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Learning Outcomes ......................................................................................... SU3-1 Overview ........................................................................................................... SU3-1 Chapter 1 Performance Management in Action .......................................... SU3-2 COURSE GUIDE GSP187 COURSE GUIDE 1. Welcome (Access video via iStudyGuide) Welcome to the course GSP187 Performance Management (Practice), a 2.5 credit unit (CU) course. This Study Guide will be your personal learning resource to take you through the course learning journey. The guide is divided into two main sections – the Course Guide and Study Units. The Course Guide describes the structure for the entire course and provides you with an overview of the Study Units. It serves as a roadmap of the different learning components within the course. This Course Guide contains important information regarding the course learning outcomes, learning materials and resources, assessment breakdown and additional course information. 2. Course Description and Aims An organisation’s success and sustainability are very much determined by the performance of its people. This course establishes the guidelines for evaluating and continuously monitoring the performance of individuals and teams based on agreed performance objectives that are aligned with an organisation’s strategy. A well-constructed and implemented performance management system establishes a strong link between employees’ performance and rewards through objective measurement of their performance and achievements, and provides constructive feedback to engage employees for developing their capability and for performing better. As part of the organisation’s performance management system, employees’ developmental needs and career aspirations are also considered. This course is intended to be practice-oriented and is targeted at practising HR personnel. Practice-oriented learning is reflected in the pedagogic approach and assessment method. The pedagogic approach will be problem-based where students 1 GSP187 COURSE GUIDE address real workplace performance management problems. The assessment method focuses on demonstrated abilities to reflect on identified problems, and will integrate theory, framework, process, toolkit and guidelines with practice to deal with workplace problems. (This course was suggested by the Workforce Development Agency [WDA] to address the need for short practice-oriented Human Resource modules which would give Human Resource personnel relevant skills to improve Human Resource Management practices in targeted areas. The reference materials can be downloaded from www.hrcapability.sg - HR Capability Toolkit, Performance Management) Course Structure This course is a 2.5-credit unit course presented over 6 weeks. There are three Study Units in this course. The following provides an overview of each Study Unit: Study Unit 1 – Introduction to Performance Management This unit will help students to explain, describe and understand the purpose, benefits, challenges, framework and processes in the performance management system. Study Unit 2 – Performance Management Planning This unit will help students to explain, describe and understand the appraisal process, evaluation approaches and conduct of performance appraisal. Study Unit 3 – Application of Performance Management This unit will require students to identify challenges and concerns in implementing and aligning performance management systems with other Human Resource systems in an organisation, and to examine approaches for implementing an appraisal system through action plans. 2 GSP187 COURSE GUIDE 3. Learning Outcomes Knowledge & Understanding (Theory) By the end of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the components of performance management systems. 2. Describe performance management planning. 3. Evaluate the importance of the performance management system in relation to business and organisational outcomes. 4. Describe performance appraisal. Key Skills (Practical) By the end of this course, you should be able to: 1. Use/modify the Human Resource ToolKit to evaluate competencies. 2. Apply and implement a competencies development and action plan. 3. Set goals for performance that are aligned with an organisation’s strategic objectives. 4. Learning Material The following is a list of the required learning materials to complete this course. Required Textbook(s) and Publication(s) Author(s) Title Year Publisher Last name, First name Bacal, Robert Manager’s Guide to Performance Management 2012 McGraw-Hill Human Resource Capability ToolKit – Performance Management 2012 SPRING and Singapore National Employers’ Federation (SNEF) 3 GSP187 COURSE GUIDE 5. Assessment Overview The overall assessment weighting for this course is as follows: Assessment Description Weight Allocation Assignment 1 Pre-Class Quiz 20% Assignment 2 Group Presentation 30% Assignment 3 TMA 50% TOTAL 100% The following section provides important information regarding Assessments. Continuous Assessment: There will be continuous assessment in the form of one pre-class quiz, one group presentation and one individual project. In total, this continuous assessment will constitute 100 percent of overall student assessment for this course. The three assignments are compulsory and are non-substitutable. If you do not attempt any one of the assessments, you will be deemed withdrawn from the course. These assignments will test the understanding of both the concepts and applications of performance management. It is imperative that you read through your Assignment questions and submission instructions before embarking on your Assignment. Passing Mark: To successfully pass the course, you must obtain a minimum passing mark of 40 percent for both the Group Presentation and the Individual Assignment and 60 percent for the pre-class quiz component. To obtain a pass grade for the course, you must achieve at least 40 percent for the overall combined assessments. For detailed information on the Course grading policy, please refer to The Student Handbook (‘Award of Grades’ section under Assessment and Examination Regulations). The Student Handbook is available from the Student Portal. Three attempts are allowed up to the closing deadline of the Pre-class Quiz. The highest marks out of all attempts will be the final score. If a student fails to meet the minimum passing mark for the Pre-class Quiz, or if he/she fails to attempt the Preclass Quiz by the stipulated deadline, he/she will be deemed to have withdrawn from the course, and will receive a ‘W’ for the course. 4 GSP187 COURSE GUIDE Non-graded Learning Activities: Activities for the purpose of self-learning are present in each study unit. These learning activities are meant to enable you to assess your understanding and achievement of the learning outcomes. The type of activities can be in the form of Quizzes, Review Questions, Application-Based Questions or similar. You are expected to complete the suggested activities either independently and/or in groups. 6. Course Schedule To help monitor your study progress, you should pay special attention to your Course Schedule. It contains study unit related activities including Assignments, Self-assessments, and Examinations. Please refer to the Course Timetable in the Student Portal for the updated Course Schedule. Note: You should always make it a point to check the Student Portal for any announcements and latest updates. 7. Learning Mode The learning process for this course is structured along the following phases: WEEK 1 Study Unit 1&2 Self-study guided by the study guide units. Independent study will require at least 6 hours per week. By the end of Week 1:  Completion of pre-class quiz  Submission of Individual Project Proposal by end of Week 1 on Workplace Performance Management problems WEEK 2 Study Unit 3 st 1 Face-to-Face Classroom Session (3 hours)   Case Study Discussion Selection of Groups and group projects WEEK 3 WEEK 4 WEEK 5 & WEEK 6 Application Application Application Self-Study, Individual and Group work 2nd Face-to-Face Classroom Session (3 hours) Self-study and Individual work Groups & Individuals are working on their projects respectively Group project presentations  5  Individuals are working on their projects Submission of Individual projects by Week 6 GSP187 COURSE GUIDE iStudyGuide You may be viewing the iStudyGuide version, which is the mobile version of the Study Guide. The iStudyGuide was developed to enhance your learning experience with interactive learning activities and engaging multimedia. Depending on the reader you are using to view the iStudyGuide, you will be able to personalize your learning with digital bookmarks, note-taking and highlight sections of the guide. Interaction with Instructor and Fellow Students Although flexible learning – learning at your own pace, space and time – is a hallmark at SUSS, you are encouraged to engage your instructor and fellow students in online discussion forums. Sharing of ideas through meaningful debates will help broaden your learning and crystallize your thinking. Academic Integrity As a student of SUSS, it is expected that you adhere to the academic standards stipulated in The Student Handbook, which contains important information regarding academic policies, academic integrity and course administration. It is necessary that you read and understand the information stipulated in the Student Handbook, prior to embarking on the course. 6 STUDY UNIT 1 INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 Learning Outcomes By the end of this unit, you will be able to: 1. State the purpose of performance management. 2. List the benefits of performance management. 3. Understand the challenges of performance management. 4. Explain the overview of a performance management framework. 5. Explain the stages of a performance management framework. 6. Describe the processes in the performance management map. SU1-1 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 Overview An organisation is made up of individuals formed into groups or teams working together to achieve common goals. For any organisation to remain relevant and competitive in the challenging economic environment, employers need to devise systems to manage employees’ performance and to recruit individuals who can help the organisation to succeed. In the operating environment, there are variables affecting and influencing human performance, such as key objectives, work programmes, training, compensation and reward, monitoring, appraisal, feedback, coaching, facilitation, delegation, development and individual action plans. Each employee’s performance is a record of outcomes that are produced for a specified job function or activity during a specified time. Intuitively, the sum of performances on job functions by individuals is mainly based on comparative judgements of human performance and this is used to provide information for promotions, salary increases, discipline, identifying effective work behaviours, developing desired competencies, and building human capital in an organisation. The function of performance management lies at the juncture of business strategy and activities that involve formulating and implementing policy, setting individual goals, assessing and recognising performance, developing processes for continuous improvement and resolving problems, and establishing links between employees, managers and the organisation. CHAPTER LEARNING OUTCOMES Chapter 1 – Purpose of Performance Management At the end of this chapter, students will be able to: Chapter 2 – Performance Management Framework  State the purpose of performance management.  List the benefits of management system.  Understand the challenges of implementing a performance management system. an effective performance At the end of this chapter, students will be able to:  Explain the overview of a performance management framework.  Explain the stages of a performance management framework.  Describe the processes management map. SU1-2 in the performance GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 This course is structured in the following approach: Study Unit 1 (Week 1): 1. Self-Study through E-Learning:  Chapter 1: Purpose of Performance Management  Chapter 2: Performance Management Framework Study Unit 2 (Week 1): 1. Self-Study through E-Learning:  Chapter 1: Identifying and Measuring Performance  Chapter 2: Performance Appraisal 2. Online Quiz Assessment:  Pre-class Online “Formative” Quiz (Not Graded)  Pre-class Online “Summative” Quiz (Graded) 3. Submission:  Individual Project Proposal – Workplace Performance Management problems Study Unit 3 (Weeks 2 to 6): 1. Self-Study and 1st Face-to-Face session (Week 2): Chapter 1 – Performance Management in Action  Case Study ̶ Discussion and practice of Performance Management  Students form groups to work on a group project and develop an implementation plan  Discussion on selected “Workplace Performance Management problems” by Project Groups 2. Self-Study, Group and Individual projects (Weeks 3 to 4):  Students work in groups on their projects to develop an implementation plan  Concurrently, students are to work on their individual projects SU1-3 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 3. Self-Study and 2nd Face-to-Face session (Week 4):  Students will present their group projects to the class (Graded) 4. Self-Study and Individual TMA (Weeks 5 to 6):  Students will work on their individual TMA and are required to submit their TMA through TURNITIN by the end of Week 6 (Graded) Self-Reflection Practice before the start of Study Unit 1: 1. Based on your past and current working experiences, what is your understanding of performance management? 2. What are those performance management components and processes that you know about or have experienced thus far? 3. In your perspective, what is the purpose of performance management? 4. What are your thoughts on performance management challenges? 5. How will you rate (scale 1 to 10, 1 being the least positive and 10 being the most positive) your experience of past appraisal sessions? 6. At your workplace, what are some performance management problems that you are seeing, experiencing or managing? SU1-4 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 Chapter 1 Purpose of Performance Management This chapter addresses the purpose and benefits of performance management and discusses performance management challenges faced by organisations. Performance management systems exist in every organisation, ranging from loosely organised approaches in small companies to very structured and detailed, documented, and bureaucratic functions in many big companies. In most human resource programmes and initiatives that were designed and launched to improve the performance of individuals and teams, performance management systems probably stand out as one of the most disappointing and troubled working processes. For many organisations, the process is not working, as employees who perceive themselves to be victims of this process often dislike it; at the same time, managers, who see themselves doing something that is extra or not necessary, also view it negatively. In most instances, employees are often disappointed with the outcomes. Indeed, it is rare to find an organisation that is satisfied with its performance management system. As such, the system and work processes often go through updates, reviews, and changes. Unfortunately, the efforts to change are mainly focused on the old system and processes, and changes are only minor and incremental adjustments from the old system. Thus, the key issues are not identified and critically addressed in a strategic and holistic manner by the organisation, resulting in the purpose of the performance management system being diluted, misinterpreted and misguided.  What is the purpose of performance management? The purpose of performance management comes from three perspectives, i.e. strategic, administrative and development. From an organisational standpoint, it is vital to link employees’ and teams’ goals and activities with the organisation’s strategic objectives. The administrative perspective sees performance management as helping it to make decisions about salary, promotions, identification of poor performers and provision of evidence through documentation to defend against legal appeals. From the organisation’s development perspective, performance management helps employees to develop and grow, and also improves communication between managers and employees, leading to better alignment of individuals’ work with the achievement of the organisation’s short- and long-term goals. Ultimately, it seeks to help individuals and teams perform to their highest potentials. From both the administrative and organisational development perspectives, performance management needs to serve many purposes as it involves many stakeholders. Thus, organisations need to integrate and align all components and processes in the performance management system to support and motivate employees and managers to achieve individuals’ goals that will contribute to organisational success. SU1-5 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1  What are the benefits of performance management? The benefits of performance management come in many forms: o Enables employees and managers to focus on their actions, making decisions and aligning their efforts in a collective manner to achieve their personal goals that will contribute to the organisation’s short- and long-term goals; o Guides and equips both employees and managers to monitor their behaviours and outcomes; o Identifies and removes barriers to performance; o Allows necessary adjustments to be carried out objectively to maximise performance; o Meets employees’ training and development requirements.  What are the performance management challenges faced by organisations? Common challenges faced by organisations in the performance management system are: o Crafting appropriate job descriptions and performance criteria o Ensuring adequate compensation and promotions for performance o Conducting effective measurement/evaluation of performance o Ensuring adequate communication efforts to stakeholders/staff about business strategy o Achieving employees’ buy-in of the performance management system o Disciplining employees as part of performance monitoring and measurement o Providing timely performance feedback and periodical appraisal sessions o Ensuring and upgrading managers’ coaching skills to help employees reflect and grow o Adapting to changing circumstances within and outside the organisation o Providing empowerment of managers and employees o Dedicating time to defining success and celebrating “small” wins along the way Performance management is a responsibility and ongoing communication process that is integral to management. This is a process, relating from strategy to execution plans, undertaken by many stakeholders in an organisation. An effective SU1-6 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 performance management system, which comprises workable and acceptable processes and components, requires partnerships, collaboration, engagement and understanding from the organisation (senior management executives), managers (supervisors) and employees, and finding practical and meaningful ways to implement it. Performance management here refers to a series of activities designed to ensure that the organisation gets the performance it needs from its employees. The partnership between supervisor and employee is vital for formulating good understanding and for gaining clarity about job functions, expectations, goal alignment, job performance, barriers to performance, and measurement of an individual’s performance. The efforts made by the supervisor to appraise and assess the employee’s performance represent only one part of the performance management system. For performance management systems to work, it is essential to create values that align the employee’s goals with the organisation’s strategic objectives, and to influence and gather support from all relevant stakeholders in the organisation. As an integrated process within a department or functional unit in an organisation, this requires open and ongoing communication between the supervisor and each employee to clarify job responsibilities, to set and monitor performance goals, to provide timely appraisal feedback and to seek continuous improvement in performance that can contribute to the organisation’s overall success and sustainability. 1. HR Capability Toolkit (www.hrcapability.sg) – Performance Management:  Introduction, Purpose and Benefits, page 2. 2. Bacal, Manager’s Guide to Performance Management, 2011:  Chapter 1 – Performance Management: An Overview, pages 1-9.  Chapter 2 – The Challenge of Performance Management, pages 11-21. Why is Performance Management so important? (https://youtu.be/RhAJkhIFFno) 4.02 minutes SU1-7 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 Chapter 2 Performance Management Framework This chapter uses the Spring Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation’s (SNEF) Performance Management Framework and Process Map as the learning resource to discuss performance management as a holistic system in an organisation for addressing and improving employees’ job performance by setting objectives, conducting appraisal discussions, coaching, providing feedback and developing action plans. This process requires the coordination and cooperation of many components (activities, stakeholders, processes, guidelines, tools and templates) in the organisation. These components must work together so that employees’ short- and long-term performance goals can be achieved through their supervisors’ active engagement, such as providing performance appraisal and feedback on employees’ training and development needs, career aspirations, documentation, disciplinary actions and development of action plans that are consistent with the organisation’s strategy, objectives and culture. Performance management comes with a series of activities and processes designed to ensure that the organisation gets the desired performance it needs from its employees. The Performance Management Framework shown below (Spring Singapore and SNEF document, page 4, Figure 4.1) has five key performance management activities (A to E) that dovetail with a set of performance management processes (12 steps) which involves four levels of management functions in a typical organisation. The performance management system involves many stakeholders (employees, heads of department, HR department and management) at different levels in the organisation. The five key activities and 12-step process are augmented with a set of seven guidelines (A4.1 to A4.7 – 7 sets), five sample tools and templates (T4.1 to T4.5 – 5 tools/templates). This performance management framework helps to establish a strong link between employees’ performance, rewards and improvements through the appraisal process, objective measurement and action plan for their performance and achievement through their job. The Spring Singapore and SNEF’s Performance Management Framework is as follows: SU1-8 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 TOOLS/TEMPLATES [A] Developing Performance Appraisal Form APPENDICES/REFERENCES STEPS [A4.1] Guidelines for Performance Appraisal [A4.2] Methods of Appraisal [B] Defining Responsibilities Step 1 [T4.1 & T4.2] Performance Appraisal Forms (Executive & Non-Executive) [A4.6] Guidelines for writing Performance Objectives [A4.1] Guidelines for Performance Appraisal [A4.4] Recommended Target Setting Measures Steps 2, 3 & 4 [D] Conducting Appraisal Discussion [T4.1 & T4.2] Performance Appraisal Forms (Executive & Non-Executive) [T4.3] Performance Improvement Plan Form [A4.1] Guidelines for Performance Appraisal Steps 5, 6, 7 & 8 [E] Developing Action Plan [T4.4] Performance Ranking Template [T4.5] Letter of Promotion [T4.1 & 4.2] Performance Appraisal Form [A4.3] Guidelines on Moderating Performance Ratings [A4.7] Guidelines on Termination of Non-performing Employees Steps 9, 10, 11 & 12 [C] Determining Appraisal Cycle Figure 1.1 Performance Management Framework (Source: Spring Singapore and SNEF document, p. 4, Figure 4.1) Next, in the Performance Management Process Map as shown below (Spring Singapore and SNEF document, page 5, Figure 4.2), the whole process comes with a 12-step plan that involves four functional levels in the organisation, i.e. Management, Human Resource Department, Employee and Head of Department. The process relates to the five key performance management activities: A-Developing Performance Appraisal Form, B-Defining Responsibilities, C-Determining Appraisal Cycle, DConducting Appraisal Discussion and E-Developing Action Plan. It involves performance planning and assessment methods, preparing supervisors for performance appraisal, SU1-9 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 scheduling for performance appraisal and for employees to set goals before the discussion, conducting performance appraisal, documenting and developing action plans: Figure 1.2 Performance Management Process Map (Source: Spring Singapore and SNEF document, p. 5, Figure 4.2) SU1-10 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 1 1. HR Capability Toolkit (www.hrcapability.sg) – Performance Management:  Performance Management Framework (Figure 4-1), page 4.  Performance Management process map (Figure 4-2), page 5. 2. Bacal, Manager’s Guide to Performance Management, 2011:  Chapter 3 – Performance Management as a System, pages 23-36. 1. Performance Management Framework (Access video via iStudyGuide) 2. How to Create a Performance Management System (https://youtu.be/8ijBfprUNuQ) 7.32 minutes Self-Reflection Practice: 1. What are your three key learning points from Study Unit 1? 2. With reference to your earlier reflective thoughts on your workplace performance management problems, and with reference to SPRING Singapore and SNEF’s performance management framework (5-key performance management activities) and process map (12-step), where are those problems located? SU1-11 STUDY UNIT 2 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT PLANNING GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 Learning Outcomes By the end of this unit, you should be able to: 1. Describe the appraisal process in the performance management system. 2. Explain the approaches for evaluation of employees’ work performance. 3. Discuss ways to make the performance appraisal process effective. 4. Examine the causes of employees’ success and/or difficulties, to help the employee perform better and/or to overcome difficulties. SU2-1 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 Overview Performance management should originate from what the organisation must accomplish to meet its strategic objectives. Each employee has some contribution to make to those greater objectives. In a sense, the sum of all employees’ performance in all their jobs in the organisation should match the strategic plan of the organisation. Increasingly, it is recognised that planning and enabling performance have a significant and critical impact and effect on individual performance, with performance goals and standards, appropriate resources, guidance and support from the manager. CHAPTER LEARNING OUTCOMES Chapter 1 – Identifying and Measuring Performance At the end of this chapter, students will be able to: Chapter 2 – Performance Appraisal  Describe the appraisal process in the performance system.  Explain the evaluation approaches on employees’ work performance. At the end of this chapter, students will be able to:  Discuss ways effective.  Examine the cause of employees’ success and/or difficulties to help employees to perform better and/or to overcome their difficulties. to make performance appraisal Self-Reflection Practice: 1. What are the current performance management practices at your workplace, i.e. performance-planning meetings, goal-setting sessions, performance review sessions? What are the types of information, rating and ranking methods used? 2. Among those practices you have highlighted, which one/s do you think is/are relevant and effective? Why? 3. Among those practices you have highlighted, which one/s do you think need/s improvements? SU2-2 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 Chapter 1 Identifying and Measuring Performance This chapter deals with the most important part of performance management – identifying and measuring performance. Performance management drives employee behaviours to align with organisational objectives through achieving their goals. This alignment can happen because (1) job responsibilities and expectations are clear, thereby facilitating increased employee and group productivity; (2) relevant and clear information becomes available for making decisions about compensation, rewards, promotions and dismissals. An effective performance appraisal system is well integrated into a performance management system that is customised to the needs of the organisation, and is acceptable, reliable, led by the Human Resource department, supported by Heads of Department who are Supervisors, and endorsed by top management. The Performance Management Framework (Spring Singapore and SNEF document, page 4, Figure 4.1) has five key performance management activities (A to E) that dovetail with a 12-step set of performance management processes (Spring Singapore and SNEF document, page 5, Figure 4.2) that involve four levels of management functions in the organisation. The five key performance management activities (A to E) and the 12-step process involve process owners having to lead, support and endorse. In this chapter, three of the five key performance activities (A to C) and 4 of the 12 steps of the performance management framework and process are identified:   “A” – Determining Performance Appraisal Forms (Led by Heads of Department, Supported by Human Resource Department and Endorsed by Management):  Establish Performance Appraisal Methods (Samples – pp. 19-25, A4.1 Guidelines on conducting Performance Appraisal and pp. 26-31, A4.2 Performance Appraisal Methods).  Establish the Appraisal Form that comes with employee’s goals and objectives for the duration of the appraisal review (Samples ̶ T4.1 Performance Appraisal Form for Executive and T4.2 Performance Appraisal Form for Non-Executive).  The ranking and grading system to be made known in the appraisal form.  Identify areas of development for the employee. “B” – Defining Responsibilities (Led by Human Resource Department and Supported by Management) and Step 1 – Determine Performance Appraising supervisors.  Management staff are to communicate the organisation’s business strategic objectives and to approve the performance management reporting structure and guidelines.  The Human Resource Department is to conduct briefings and administer training for appraising supervisors on the performance management process. SU2-3 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2   The appraising supervisor will work with employees (direct report) to set their individual goals that are aligned with the organisation’s strategic objectives, to monitor and provide coaching and ongoing feedback throughout the year, and to provide closure during the appraisal session at the end of the year. “C” – Determining Appraisal Cycle (Led by Human Resource Department and Supported by Heads of Department [Supervisors]) and Step 2 – Agree on criteria for appraisal, notify staff of Performance Appraisal (PA) period, Step 3 – Disseminate PA information and document to supervisors and employees and Step 4 – Complete PA form.  The appraisal process is an on-going communication process between the appraising supervisor and employee – which can be carried out on a monthly, bi-monthly, quarterly or half-yearly basis throughout the year – about the employee’s goals, feedback and follow-up actions.  In goal setting, the employee’s performance and developmental goals and expectations are made known and clarified to align with the organisation and team/group objectives.  As a matter of discipline, appraising supervisors are to keep records of their employees’ performance outcomes throughout the year for ongoing performance appraisal sessions to provide coaching and feedback, and to highlight areas for development to employees.  The annual Performance Appraisal is to focus on: o Achievements and performance for the current year. o Areas in which the employee has done well and areas that need improvement. o The employee’s development plans for the following year. Managing employees’ performance in organisations has traditionally centred on assessing performance and allocating reward, with effective performance seen as the outcome of the interaction between individual ability and motivation. Increasingly, it is recognised that planning and enabling performance have a critical effect on employee performance, with performance goals and standards, resources, guidance and support from the manager all being central. In order to sustain performance in a fast changing world, an integrated approach that centres on dialogue, shared understanding, agreement and mutual commitment is needed to address employees’ developmental and motivational issues so that performance management systems are effective and adaptive for the engagement, growth, and enhancement of employees’ work performance. SU2-4 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 There is an assumption that, before the organisation is able to plan and manage an employee’s performance, it will need to make significant effort and take active steps to identify the performance required of the organisation through its vision, mission statements and values so that performance can be seen within the context of an organisational theme. In addition, the organisation will need to identify strategic business objectives that are required within the current business context to be competitive and also to ensure alignment with its own vision, mission, values and identified key competencies. The performance appraisal system has provided a formalised process to review employee performance. It is centrally designed and usually comes under the Human Resource function, and requires managers to appraise the performance of their staff, often in an annual performance review meeting. Elaborate forms are completed as an official record at the end of this process, but these are not living documents. Generally, these records are stored in the archives of the HR department, and are often neglected until the next round of performance review meetings. Even as performance appraisal has been applied to mostly everyone in an organisation, there are concerns that while appraisal systems are treated as an administrative exercise for determining promotion, bonuses and termination, they remain ineffective and do little to improve the future performance of employees. With many appraisal systems being put in place and continually being updated, performance management systems are increasingly seen as the way to manage employee performance. A view is emerging of performance management, which centres on it being a platform for sharing understanding, mutual commitment, building consensus and agreement, rather than as a system of rating for pay purposes. To this end, organisations are suggesting that employees take more ownership of their own performance management. Organisations have also tried to achieve both development and reward outcomes for employees, but this may undermine the motivational outcomes of development-focused approaches which encourage time spent with the manager and ongoing two-way communication. Performance is delivered by the employee and monitored by the manager. In a typical performance management system at work, the process begins by defining the organisation’s objectives, and then moves to translating these objectives into individual-level goals and to specifying the development if needed. The continuous cycle of performance management is where managers work with employees to create a common understanding of performance and developmental goals, and about how and when those goals are being monitored, supported and measured. The most important stage of the performance management cycle is the ongoing feedback and coaching to support the achievement of individual-level objectives. Finally, there is an assessment of employee performance and a link to reward, promotion, improvement or termination before the new appraisal cycle starts again. SU2-5 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 Goals Setting Appraisal Feedback Figure 2.1 Appraisal Cycle (Source: Spring Singapore & SNEF’s Performance Management Framework, Key Activity “C” – Determining Appraisal Cycle, p.9, Figure 4-4) When a performance appraisal scheme has been designed, the next step is to choose an appropriate approach or combination of approaches to measure employees’ performance. They are:  Comparative approach – requires the manager to compare an employee’s performance with that of other employees. This approach uses some overall assessment of an employee’s performance or worth, and seeks to develop a ranking of the employees within a work group. There are three methods: o Ranking − (1) Normal Ranking – the manager ranks every employee from the best performer to the worst performer and (2) Alternate Ranking – the manager picks the best performer, and then puts him or her out of the ranking list. The remaining performers in the list will be ranked to determine the worst performer. o Forced distribution – requires the manager to put certain percentages of employees into predetermined performance categories, i.e. best, above average, average, below average, and worst. o Paired comparison – requires managers to compare every employee with every other employee in the work group, giving each employee a score of 1 point every time he or she is considered the higher performer. In the end, the manager will add up the number of points each employee has received, making it his or her performance evaluation. SU2-6 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 In addressing disadvantages: the comparative approach, ADVANTAGES are advantages and DISADVANTAGES  Effective tool in differentiating  employee performance in a work group. Insufficient numbers of raters (managers), personal biases and opinions would greatly affect the ratings.  Eliminates problems of central tendency, strictness, and leniency.  Lack of specificity for feedback purposes, as employees are not aware of what they should improve on for their individual ranking.  Good basis to determine for pay raises and promotions.  Easy to develop and use by manager.  there Attribute approach – focuses on the characteristics and traits of the employees that are geared towards the success of the organisation. This approach will require having a set of traits defined, such as initiative, leadership, creativity and competitiveness, and will evaluate the employees based on these traits. The advantages and disadvantages of this approach are: ADVANTAGES DISADVANTAGES  Easy to develop.  Little congruence between this approach and the organisation’s strategy.  Could be vague due to different interpretations by different raters (managers).  Generalisable across a variety of jobs.  Attention is devoted to identifying attributes related to job performance; this approach would be reliable and valid.  Behavioural approach – requires managers to keep a record of specific examples of effective and ineffective performance on the part of each employee. It entails managing the behaviours of employees through a formal system of behavioural feedback and reinforcement supported by a behavioural checklist using observation scales and multiple ratings (for instance, 360-degree review). This approach can involve both internal and SU2-7 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 external parties – i.e. directors, managers, co-workers and customers – to evaluate employees’ performance. In summary, most existing performance management systems measure performance in terms of quantity, not quality, and employees are made accountable for the results they achieve. Some organisations do not share the financial rewards of successes with their employees according to how much they have contributed to those successes; rewards are not connected to business results. For performance management to be effective as a system, it should be a continuous process driven by management and related to the organisation’s strategy and objectives, and it should clearly define expectations, helping to align employee behaviours with the culture and business needs of the organisation. In addition, an effective performance management system should provide ongoing feedback to help employees improve their individual performance throughout the assessment cycle rather than relying on the formal process of annual or bi-annual Performance Appraisal sessions. With the buy-in of mindsets at all levels in the organisation, an effective performance management system can increase productivity and bring visible, value-added benefits for both the employees and organisation. A welldeveloped, adaptive, and legally compliant performance management system is an essential talent and engagement management tool for high-performing and sustainable organisations. SU2-8 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 1. 2. HR Capability Toolkit (www.hrcapability.sg) – Performance Management:  Performance Management Framework, “A” to “C” Key Activities, pages 612.  A4-1 Guidelines on Conducting Performance Appraisal, pages 19-25.  A4.2 Performance Appraisal Methods, pages 26-31.  A4.4 Recommended Target Setting Measures, pages 41-42.  A4.6 Guidelines for Writing Performance Objectives, pages 48-51.  T4.1 Performance Appraisal Form (Executive), HR Capability Toolkit, pages 39-44.  T4.2 Performance Appraisal Form (Non-Executive), HR Capability Toolkit, pages 45-48.  T4.3 Performance Improvement Plan, HR Capability Toolkit, pages 50-51. Bacal, Manager’s Guide to Performance Management, 2011:  Chapter 4 – Getting Ready: Preparing to Start the Process, pages 37-47.  Chapter 5 – Performance Planning: Setting Targets, pages 49-62. Identifying and Measuring Performance (Access video via iStudyGuide) SU2-9 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 Chapter 2 Performance Appraisal This chapter discusses the performance appraisal and review process. The appraisal is a formal session that will be conducted bi-annually or annually, based on the organisation’s performance management system criteria. In this session, employee and manager meet to discuss the employee’s current and future performance, clarifying the organisation’s objectives and helping the employee set performance goals that are aligned with the organisation’s and team/group’s objectives, and to work out an action plan to achieve the performance goals set by the employee. If the employee’s current performance is found unsatisfactory, the manager will need to work closely with the employee to determine a performance improvement plan. When designing a performance appraisal scheme, one of the considerations is to reduce the manager’s bias – i.e. halo effect, recency effect, stereotyping, comparing, prejudice, central/leniency/strictness tendencies and fatigue of appraiser (manager) – and to increase the accuracy of the performance assessment of employee. In many ways, the performance appraisal process offers an opportunity for the manager to build rapport with the employee and to provide feedback about the employee’s performance. This is not simply about completing an assessment form; rather, this is a deliberate process that requires preparation, i.e. scheduling, diagnosing performance, planning for the future, conducting follow-up meetings and documenting the conversation, by both parties to engage in positive conversation. While the employee is working to achieve the agreed performance goals, the manager retains a key enabling role in assisting the employee. The manager frequently needs to use coaching and counselling skills before and during the appraisal process to help, support and engage the employee to understand the organisation’s strategic objectives. The manager also needs to help the employee take ownership of his or her goals and actions, and have the extrinsic and intrinsic motivations to achieve his or her performance goals. Ongoing coaching during the execution of those tasks related to the employee is especially important as the manager can guide the employee through discussions and by providing constructive feedback. This offers an opportunity for feedback that can help the employee improve job performance, increase job satisfaction and discretionary behaviour, and can reduce the employee’s intention to resign. In addition, the manager can refer the employee to practical job experiences to develop the critical skills and competencies that the employee needs, and provide job-related opportunities for practice. The manager can identify potential role models to the employee, helping to explain how high achievers perform so well and effectively. On dealing with disciplinary, retrenchment, career development and pre-retirement issues, the manager will use counselling skills to help the employee address his or her difficulties by listening, being empathetic, taking a non-directive approach, advising, giving information, SU2-10 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 and asking relevant questions to frame and assist the employee to find his or her own answers. Feedback about the improvement needs of the employee is similar in that it requires the manager to be as specific and factual as possible. At work, most employees want feedback from their managers and colleagues to help them improve. However, most of the crucial feedback given to the employee is less frequent than it should be. This is significant as frequent feedback can address issues in a timely and effective manner. Some feedback will require human intervention to give it real meaning and purpose. Without providing timely, positive and constructive feedback, there can be only a limited sense of achievement and opportunity in improving employees’ performance; likewise, there is only limited awareness by the manager about the employee’s performance and challenges. In trying to make performance feedback less onerous for the manager and more helpful to the employee, it is good practice to separate performance feedback from the conduct of annual performance appraisal. It is worth remembering that the purposes of the annual performance appraisal are manifold:  to summarise, in the form of ratings and commentary, the employee`s performance over the current year;  to discuss the performance and effectiveness of the steps the employee has undertaken for improvement, and the possible implications for salary increases, rewards, promotion and dismissal;  to put in place action plans for the next year, such as getting the employee to set performance goals that are related to the organisation’s and team/group’s objectives. The remaining two key performance activities (Spring Singapore and SNEF document, page 4, Figure 4.1, D to E) and 8 steps (page 5, Figure 4.2) of the Spring Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation’s performance management framework and process map will be addressed in this chapter:  “D” – Conducting Appraisal Discussion (Led by Appraisal Supervisors and Supported by Employees) and Step 5 – Performance Appraisal meeting with supervisor, Step 6 – Recommend employees for promotion and increment, Step 7 – Submit completed PA form to HR and Step 8 – Collate all forms and send to Managing Director for approval.  This appraisal discussion is an important activity for the manager and employee to come together. It is a formal session for both to discuss, clarify and provide feedback on the employee’s work performance, goals achieved, job challenges, development opportunities, career aspirations, areas for performance improvement, requests for assistance and performance goals for SU2-11 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 the next year (Samples - T4.1 Performance Appraisal Form for Executive and T4.2 Performance Appraisal Form for Non-Executive).   “E” – Developing Action Plan (Led by Heads of Department, Supported by Appraising Supervisors and Human Resource Department and Endorsed by Management) and Step 9 – Approve recommendations, Step 10 – Prepare letters for promotion and increment, Step 11 – Notify employees of their promotion and increment and Step 12 – Update HR system/P-file on employee’s performance rating.  1. When the employee fails to meet the job expectations or agreed performance goals, the manager is required to work closely with the employee to determine a performance improvement plan. In this process, the manager may issue a verbal or written first warning to the concerned employee. If so, this action will be documented for possible future actions, i.e. second and third warning and termination where necessary (Samples - T4.3 Performance Improvement Plan and A4.5 Guidelines for Crafting a Performance Improvement Plan). The last key performance activity consolidates and finalises all the outcomes of the performance appraisal of the employee evaluated by the manager in writing. The appraisal is submitted to the Human Resource department for its documentation and ranking exercise, i.e. bonus, rewards, incentives, recognition, training, mentoring, coaching, talent programmes, promotion, counselling, performance warning and so on (Samples – A4.6 Guidelines for Writing Performance Objectives, A7.3 Talent Management and Development, T4.4 Performance Ranking Template and T4.5 Letter of Promotion). HR Capability Toolkit (www.hrcapability.sg) – Performance Management:  Performance Management Framework, “C” to “D” Key Activities, pages 1317.  A4.1 Guidelines for Performance Appraisal, pages 19-25.  A4.3 Guidelines on Moderating Performance Ratings, pages 32-40.  A4.5 Guidelines for Crafting a Performance Improvement Plan, pages 43-47.  A4.7 Guidelines on Termination of Non-performing Employees, pages 52-54.  T4.1 Performance Appraisal Form (Executive), HR Capability Toolkit, pages 39-44. SU2-12 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2  T4.2 Performance Appraisal Form (Non-Executive), HR Capability Toolkit, pages 45-48.  T4.3 Performance Improvement Plan, HR Capability Toolkit, pages 50-51.  T4.4 Performance Ranking Template, HR Capability Toolkit, page 52.  T4.5 Letter of Promotion, HR Capability Toolkit, page 53. 2. Bacal, Manager’s Guide to Performance Management, 2011:  Chapter 6 – Ongoing Performance Communication, pages 63-74. 1. How to conduct a performance appraisal. (https://youtu.be/AKS5YQAw8Wg) 2.26 minutes 2. How can managers give effective feedback? (https://youtu.be/kHyelDJvsCI) 4.18 minutes 3. How employee recognition is essential for performance management. (https://youtu.be/_1oCjW_gFcg) 1.37 minutes Formative Assessment – Non-Graded Online Quiz: Students must complete the formative quiz to reinforce learning. Summative Assessment – Graded Online Quiz: Students must complete and pass this summative quiz before attending the 1st Faceto-Face classroom session (Week 2). Announcement of the date and time will be published in Learning Management System. This is an open-book quiz where you can make unlimited attempts within a stipulated period. Students must score a minimum grade of 60%. Otherwise, you will be deemed withdrawn from the Course. SU2-13 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 2 Self-Reflection Practice: 1. After completing Study Unit 2, what are your thoughts on performance management planning leading to the conduct of the performance appraisal? 2. What are your three key learning points from Study Unit 2? 3. Looking at your current workplace performance evaluation practice, be it ratings and rankings, or a combination of both, do you think that it is able to engage employees to get the desired outcomes to meet your organisation’s business objectives? 4. In addressing your individual project proposal submission, what is the workplace performance management problem that you want to examine and resolve? 5. Consider Spring Singapore and Singapore National Employers Federation’s (SNEF) Performance Management Framework (five key activities, A to E), Process Map (12 steps), Guidelines (A4.1 to 4.7) and Tools & Templates (T4.1 to 4.5). How can these tools help you in your project on workplace performance management? SU2-14 STUDY UNIT 3 APPLICATION OF PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT GSP187 STUDY UNIT 3 Learning Outcomes By the end of this unit, you should be able to: 1. Identify the challenges, benefits and concerns in implementing and aligning performance management systems with other Human Resource Systems in an organisation. 2. Examine effective approaches for implementing an appraisal system through action plans. Overview Performance management is an integrated system that centres on “dialogue”, “shared understanding”, “agreement” and “mutual commitment”. The theoretical description of such systems emphasises their value as being the link between individual employee performance and the achievement of an organisation’s strategic goals. The underlying belief is that managers can influence the behaviours of employees through human actions. Unfortunately, the available psychological evidence suggests that this is not the case. Research shows that people vary significantly in their reactions to the persuasion or coercion of others, depending rather on their perception of their own ability to control their own lives. CHAPTER LEARNING OUTCOMES Chapter 1 – Performance At the end of this chapter, students will be able to: Management in Action  Identify the challenges, benefits and concerns in implementing and aligning Performance Management systems with other Human Resource Systems in an organisation.  Examine effective approaches for implementing an appraisal system through action plans. SU3-1 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 3 Chapter 1 Performance Management in Action For this chapter, what you have learned about performance management will be put together with a case study on Acme Progressive Company. You will see how the company uses a performance management system to add and create value through positive relationships and effective communication between manager and employee, working as partners to find ways to remove barriers, to resolve problems and to seek improvement on the current situation so that everyone can benefit. All students are required to examine and resolve their selected workplace performance management problems for their Group and Individual projects in this course. Group Project:  After the 1st Face-to-Face session in Week 2, each project group is to discuss and identify workplace performance management problems, and to develop solutions and recommendations for group presentations in Week 4.  The 2nd Face-to-Face session is in Week 4, during which the following activities will take place: o Each project group will be given a maximum of 20 minutes to present and share their findings, results and learning, using FLIP CHART paper or other simple materials. DO NOT give a POWERPOINT presentation. o The presentation format will be in the form of a GALLERY walk process; at any one time the Group station will be hosted by 2 presenters and each group needs to rotate its members to give the presentation as well as send “learning” visitors to other group stations. o After the presentation, the class will come together to reflect on and share their findings, discoveries and learning. Individual TMA:  By Week 1 of this course, you are required to post on Learning Management System a workplace performance management problem that you would like to solve (instructions will be provided by your Instructor about where to post these problems). The workplace performance management problem MUST have the following requirements: o It must be a REAL and CURRENT challenge/issue related to performance management, i.e. system, process or components SU3-2 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 3 o It is work-related and has an impact on your performance or your team and/or organisation o Currently, there are NO existing solutions available o You can somehow INFLUENCE the actions to be taken after the completion of this Performance Management (GSP187) course o The challenge/issue statement posted on Learning Management System must not be more than four sentences  You are to submit your individual TMA (workplace performance management problems report), i.e. findings, analysis and recommendations, in a report format (1200 words, ARIAL font size 12, Spacing 1.5). The submission has to be completed by Week 6 through TURNITIN. NO presentation is required. 1. HR Capability Toolkit (www.hrcapability.sg) – Performance Management:  Performance Management Framework (Figure 4-1), page 4.  Performance Management Process Map (Figure 4-2), page 5. 2. Bacal, Manager’s Guide to Performance Management, 2011:  Chapter 16 – Performance Management in Action, pages 191-200. 1. Group Project Presentation with 30% weightage of the total grade must be completed by all students working in groups. 2. Tutor Marked Assignment (TMA) with 50% weightage of the total grade must be completed by each student in the course. SU3-3 GSP187 STUDY UNIT 3 Self-Reflection Practice: 1. After going through Study Unit 3, how do you now view performance management as a system with processes and components (self-reflection after each face-to-face classroom session)? 2. What were your thoughts on preparing for and working on the Group project (after 1st Face-to-Face classroom session)? 3. What are your two key learning points for Study Unit 3 (self-reflection after each Face-to-Face classroom session)? 4. After attending the 1st Face-to-Face classroom session, what has become clearer about the performance management problems to be examined, resolved and implemented (which you stated in your individual TMA)? SU3-4

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Tutortosh
School: University of Maryland

Hello, here is the paper. please let me know if you may need any edit or clarification. Thanks

Work Place Performance Management Report

Name:
Student ID:
GSP187, Performance Management
Assignment Number

1

Work Place Performance Management Report

2

Work Place Performance Management Report
Background of Workplace
The key feature in achieving the organization's goals and objectives is achieving the
best performance management. Performance management ensures that employees in
an organization achieve the best set goals and targets which lead to the achievement of
the general organization goals. To manage well the performance of any organization,
the management performs human resource appraisal that ensures that the performance
of the organization is at optimum level as well as a method of rewarding, promoting and
motivating employees for achieving targets and set goals. LTA (my Organization) has a
clear framework that helps in managing and motivating its employees and ensuring
those employees abilities are recognized for the betterment of the organization and the
employee’s work-life balance ("Generational Change, the Modern Workplace and
Performance Appraisal: Why Changing Workplaces Need a Developmental Approach to
Performance Appraisal", 2018). Even though the organization has a sufficient work-life
balance in the organization, the management uses the raking method to achieve
performance appraisal for the employees to make a way of rewarding, promoting and
motivating the employees in the organization.
Ranking system method rates the employee's performance form the best to the worst.
Usually, in this system, the best performers have small percentages, the average
performers have higher interests in the ranking, and the worst performers have small
percentages in the ranking. Ranking system method motivates the employees to be
ranked the best in the system hence being advantageous to the organization while they
are rewarded with higher salaries, good bonuses, and promotions among other benefits.
The system recognizes employees through performances and enables the management
to identify those employees who can be depended on in the organization hence can
help them o determine the best and the reliable employees who can be considered for
job retention.
Despite this method being good in ...

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