ENGL 236 Human Nature as Portrayed Using Animal Symbolism

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Question Description

Directions: Choose TWO texts from our class readings thus far. You may not select more than one text by a single author. Texts to select from: Oroonoko, Candide, Wordsworth’s poem “Lines Composed . . . ,” Blake’s poems “The Ecchoing Green” or “The Tyger,” or Keats’s poems “Ode to a Nightingale” or “To Autumn”

The essay should follow the guidelines below:

3-4 pages long

Quote at least two times from each of the selected texts

Typed, double-spaced in a font such as 12-point Times New Roman.

Page numbers in a header with your last name.

A title that is more than the title of the text you are writing about.

You do not need a cover page. Do not put the essay in a plastic folder.

The essay must analyze, not just summarize. Use examples from the text to support your focus. Discuss the relevance of the examples and draw conclusions based on your assertions. For more help with literary analysis, see the materials loaded in the Canvas Major Assignments module.

Outside research is not required and is not recommended. If you did your Research Assignment on a topic relevant to this essay, you may include quotes/paraphrases from your research, but then you must provide a Works Cited page. You do not need a Works Cited page if you are only quoting from assigned readings (either in the Longman or online).

There are the rest of the instructions in the files and there are also guidelines to follow

ENGL 236 Literary Analysis Essay Assignment Directions: Choose TWO texts from our class readings thus far. You may not select more than one text by a single author. Texts to select from: Oroonoko, Candide, Wordsworth’s poem “Lines Composed . . . ,” Blake’s poems “The Ecchoing Green” or “The Tyger,” or Keats’s poems “Ode to a Nightingale” or “To Autumn” The essay should follow the guidelines below: • • • • • • 3-4 pages long Quote at least two times from each of the selected texts Typed, double-spaced in a font such as 12-point Times New Roman. Page numbers in a header with your last name. A title that is more than the title of the text you are writing about. You do not need a cover page. Do not put the essay in a plastic folder. The essay must analyze, not just summarize. Use examples from the text to support your focus. Discuss the relevance of the examples and draw conclusions based on your assertions. For more help with literary analysis, see the materials loaded in the Canvas Major Assignments module. Outside research is not required and is not recommended. If you did your Research Assignment on a topic relevant to this essay, you may include quotes/paraphrases from your research, but then you must provide a Works Cited page. You do not need a Works Cited page if you are only quoting from assigned readings (either in the Longman or online). Due Date: Submit the completed essay to Canvas and bring a hard copy to class on Feb. 27, 2019. * This essay will be eligible for a revision. Topic Choices: • • • • • • • • • The role of the other or the outsider in a selected text Nature vs. Civilization Women in society Imagery and/or symbolism in a selected text Using literature as a platform to critique society The evolution of a particular character—transformation and change Comparison of two characters from two different texts. Explore how the text is a product of the time period during which it was written Examine how the text explores human desire to make sense of the world around them, and/or to affect change in the world Class #5: We will not have regular class on Feb. 20, 2019. You may come to my office (LAH 222D) from 10:00-1:30 if you would like to discuss the essay. I can brainstorm with you, help you to outline ideas, or very quickly review drafts. The conferences are optional. You do not have to come. Everyone will receive Class #5 attendance points. ENGL 236 You may quote/paraphrase from introductory notes for any text, but this would not count toward your minimum of two quotes from each literary work. I am most interested in your interpretation of the selected topic as it pertains to the literary texts you choose to write about. Show that you have read, and show that you have thought critically about what you have read. Quoting the text: Your essay must include at least two quotations from each text, and they must be properly cited. After the quote, put a parenthetical citation (page # quote is found on). Quotations help to keep you on track and stay focused on the text while proving your assertion. The words of the author can enhance your own writing by providing textual evidence for your thesis. Follow this formula: Introductory phrase to provide context, “Quotation” (author’s last name page #). Example: Behn describes Oroonoko emphasizing his European characteristics: “His nose was rising and Roman, instead of African and flat. . . ” (305). If the quote is more than four lines typed, block it. Do this by setting it apart from the rest of the paragraph ten spaces. Put an introductory phrase ending with a colon: Move in ten spaces and type the quote. You do not need quotation marks because the block counts as quotations. You do need to have over 4 lines, however. When you are finished, hit “Enter/Return” and come back out to the left-hand margin to end your paragraph. Never end a paragraph with a blocked quote because you need to transition to your next idea. Put the parenthetical citation at the end of the block. (#) Explain the quote and transition to the next idea. Have at least two more sentences to your paragraph out of the block quote. Please remember, if plagiarism is detected, it is an automatic zero for the assignment! The essay may be submitted to turnitin.com.
Guidelines for the Literary Analysis Essay STRUCTURE OF THE ESSAY Introduction: An introduction should be at least one paragraph with a minimum of three sentences. The three components listed below should be part of the introduction. • • • Hook: The hook presents an idea or a scenario that is general. It does not give an indication of the text yet. As the writer, you know that this will connect to an idea from the text you are going to discuss; however, you have not shared that with your audience yet. Context: The context sentence connects the hook to the text. The author and title should be given. Title should be in italics for a longer work (like a book or movie) and in quotes for a shorter work (like a short story or poem). o Make sure to include the time period for the text and the location of origin of the text somewhere at the beginning of the essay. Thesis: This is a statement of opinion and that shows an interpretation of the text. It should not be a statement of fact. o The thesis should express an opinion—something that you will attempt to prove in the essay. Since you are writing a short essay, make sure that every body paragraph helps to prove the thesis. * See the video “The Power of a Great Introduction” in the Major Assignments module for more information. Body Paragraphs: • • • • • As part of your pre-writing, write a list of reasons or examples from the text that illustrate or prove your thesis. Each of these will become a body paragraph. You should have at least three in order to develop a full essay. Body paragraphs should present a topic sentence and then analyze that topic through concrete interpretation of the text. Strive to use the best textual examples to prove the point. Make sure the textual example effectively supports the thesis. Never end a body paragraph with a quote. Always explain the relevance of the quote to the point you are making, and then transition to the next idea. A typical body paragraph may follow this pattern: Topic sentence. Development sentence(s). Introductory phrase for quote, “Quote from text” (parenthetical citation). Explanation of the relevance of the quote to the point you are making. Develop the explanation. Transition to the next paragraph/idea. Body paragraphs should never begin or end with quotations. As the writer, you want to establish the point, and you want to wrap the point up. Make sure you have a clear topic sentence for every paragraph and that you develop your thoughts on the topic before integrating a quote. Picking Quotations and Smooth Integration of Quotations When developing textual examples, pick quotations that help prove the point you are trying to make. Select quotes that highlight the relevance of the point and don’t be afraid to include enough of the quote to show how it connects to the idea that you have. Avoid quotes that function solely as summary. The quote should contain language that you can analyze, meaning there should be something about the quote that you want to explain further. All quotes should have introductory phrases. Introductory phrases at least point out who is speaking. More importantly, introductory phrases connect your ideas to the textual example. They offer a bridge into the quote. They steer your reader. After a quote, there must be an explanation, analysis, and transition. Explain the relevance of the quote to the point you are making. Examine pieces of the language of the quote. Then develop the analysis. Explore meaning. Finally, transition to the next idea (if you are writing an essay). Quotes up to four lines typed get integrated into the paragraph. Quotes over four lines typed get put in block format. See Purdue OWL handout in the Major Assignments module for more on this information. Conclusion: • • • Review the main ideas of your essay in a few sentences; however, do not repeat the same phrasing from the introduction. Draw overall conclusions. Share what the individual examples show about the text as a whole. Connect to the bigger picture. Consider the world beyond the text. Does the message or idea apply to your frame of knowledge and experience? I often provide similar feedback on essays. Here are some of the most common comments: • Names of longer texts get put in italics. Titles of shorter texts found within longer texts (like a poem or short story) get put in quotation marks. • For academic writing, calling what you are reading a “text” rather than story, or call the text by its genre: an epic poem, play, novel, short story, etc. Do not call a text by a genre it is not (i.e., do not call a play a novel) • When you pose questions, they require answers. In fact, rather than questions, provide assertive statements. Don’t leave your reader wondering what the answer to a question is. • Eliminate unnecessary “I” statements. (i.e., I believe, I think, I will show, etc.). • Avoid the phrase “this quote shows”. It is a quote because you are quoting it. Instead refer to the idea or point. Just write, “This shows.” • Always consider the whole text. Consider how things are at the beginning but also at the end. For example, does a character show any growth? Don’t just examine the beginning if things happen to change the character by the end. • Sometimes I am asked how people get a high “A” or if it is possible to get 100%. The answer is yes, but the essay has to show something original, something that was not fully explored in the lecture or discussion. Lower “A’s” take what we discussed in class and show more analysis of it. The lower “A” is a well-written essay that is distinctive in regard to quote selection and analysis. A high “A” or perfect score does everything the low “A” does but explores something that was not discussed in lecture or discussion or was only touched upon in lecture and discussion.
Approaches to Writing Literary Analysis In general, remember the following: • • • Do not summarize. An analysis essay is not a book report. You are analyzing a text(s). Stay close to the text. Do not write about your life or about how themes from the text can be seen in the world today unless you are asked to do so. Form an idea about the text. This idea should be an opinion you have about something in the text. This will become your thesis. Each body paragraph should support that thesis by exploring examples and providing commentary on ideas. Introduction: An introduction should be at least one paragraph with a minimum of three sentences. The three components listed below should be part of the introduction. • • • Hook: The hook presents an idea or a scenario that is general. It does not give an indication of the text yet. As the writer, you know that this will connect to an idea from the text you are going to discuss; however, you have not shared that with your audience yet. Context: The context sentence connects the hook to the text. The author and title should be given. Title should be in italics for a longer work (like a book or movie) and in quotes for a shorter work (like a short story or poem). Thesis: This is a statement of opinion and that shows an interpretation of the text. It should not be a statement of fact. Body Paragraphs: • • • • Write a list of reasons or examples from the text that illustrate or prove your thesis. Each of these will become a body paragraph. Body paragraphs should present a topic sentence and then develop that sub-topic or interpretation. Never end a body paragraph with a quote. Always explain the relevance of the quote to the point you are making, and then transition to the next idea. A typical body paragraph may follow this pattern: Topic sentence. Development sentence(s). Introductory phrase for quote, “Quote from text” (parenthetical citation). Explanation of the relevance of the quote to the point you are making. Develop the explanation. Transition to the next paragraph/idea. Conclusion: • • • Review the main ideas of your essay in a few sentences; however, do not repeat the same phrasing from the introduction. Draw overall conclusions. Share what the individual examples show about the text as a whole. Connect to the bigger picture. Consider the world beyond the text. Does the message or idea apply to your frame of knowledge and experience? Adding Quotes: • A good rule of thumb is to have a minimum number of quotes be the same as the length of the essay (i.e., four-page essay=four quotes). You may certainly add more, but not less. • ALL quoted material should be introduced with an introductory phrase to establish context and create a transition. An introductory phrase can say who is speaking or it can set up what the quote will show. Examples: Hemingway writes, “Quote.” or The symbolic nature of snow is evident: “Quote.” o Introductory phrases end with a comma if they are short and a colon if they are long. Introductory phrases for block quotes always end in a colon regardless of length. • Follow the formula: Introductory phrase+Quote+(parenthetical citation). o The parenthetical citation should contain the author’s last name and the page number. If the author’s name is the introductory phrase, then you can just put the page number inside the parenthetical citation. • Quotes should be blocked if they are over four lines typed. Block by indenting ten spaces for the entire quote. After the quote, come back out to the left-hand margin and explain the quote and then transition to the next paragraph. • Never begin or end a body paragraph with a quote. Control your text.

Tutor Answer

henryprofessor
School: Cornell University

Attached.

Human Nature as Portrayed Using Animal Symbolism- Outline
Thesis Statement: The use of animal symbolism in Blake and Keats’ poems brings out the
common traits of human nature and its complexity hence showing how human beings behave and
anxieties that they have about mortality and freedom.
I. Introduction
II. Similarities
A. Mystery
B. Mortality and spirituality
III. The tiger vs. nightingale
IV. Conclusion


Surname 1
Name
Professor
Course
Date
Human Nature as Portrayed Using Animal Symbolism
The idea of a person escaping and taking the place of an animal is a fantasy many people
have in their minds. However, in John Keats’ Ode to a Nightingale and William Blake’s The
Tyger, the idea of animal form representing humans is put to use to communicate various
themes. Keats’ poem was written in 1819 while Blake’s was in 1794. These two poems which
were both written during the Georgian Era mainly use animals to communicate the message of
the poems and by doing so, symbolism takes center stage. The use of animal symbolism in Blake
and Keats’ poems brings out the common traits of human nature and its complexity hence
showing how human beings behave and anxieties that they have about mortality and freedom.
Both authors present their animal symbols as mysteries which the reader has to discover
through ...

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Review

Anonymous
Tutor went the extra mile to help me with this essay. Citations were a bit shaky but I appreciated how well he handled APA styles and how ok he was to change them even though I didnt specify. Got a B+ which is believable and acceptable.

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