I'm having trouble with this systems of equations problem:

Calculus
Tutor: None Selected Time limit: 1 Day

Within a species, the surface area of an animal is proportional to the square of its length and the mass is proportional to the cube of its length. If the animal doubles in mass, by what factor would you expect surface area to increase?

Sep 2nd, 2015

Thank you for the opportunity to help you with your question!

if the surface area of the animal is proportional to the square of its length.

mass of the animal is proportional to cube of its length.

therefore doubling of the animals mass would mean that the cube has doubled in terms of its such that 2L^3.

hence, in finding the cube-root of the animal it would mean that the length would be 2L( assuming L indicates length).

therefore if previously the surface area was square of the length. it means that the surface area know would be 2L^2. it is therefore definite that the surface area would have doubled because of the doubling in square of its length.

Please let me know if you need any clarification. I'm always happy to answer your questions.
Sep 2nd, 2015

Thank you for the help! I was just wondering, if it says mass is proportional to the cube of the length, does that mean we would need to include a constant of proportionality? 

Sep 2nd, 2015

yes, it would be important to do so

Sep 2nd, 2015

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Sep 2nd, 2015
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Sep 2nd, 2015
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