Policy Analysis

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timer Asked: Mar 3rd, 2019
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Question Description

Prepare a draft 4-6 page Policy Analysis (Section 5, part B), which must contain:

o Policy Evaluation (minimum of 3 subheadings)

o Impact on Community & Society

The policy analysis is 5-6 pages that serves as your literature review. You may organize this section in a way that is most meaningful to you, so subject headings may vary somewhat (but you must have subject headings!). Regardless of how you choose to organize your analysis, this section must include:

o Theoretical Framework (Part A) (ALREADY DONE)

 What criminological theories are useful in analyzing/understanding your policy? You must identify at least two theories you have learned about in prior courses (e.g., social control theory, deterrence theory, labeling, General Strain Theory, etc.) and apply them to your policy.

o Policy Evaluation

 Does your policy work, based on the definition of success you identified above? Why or why not? What does the empirical research about your policy reveal? Here your conclusions should be based on empirical evidence – statistics, patterns, trends, data, etc.

o Impact on Community & Society

 Does your policy have specific impact on particular community groups? Women, people of color, adolescents, gays and lesbians, immigrants, convicted felons, police officers, veteran/military personnel, urban residents, etc.? If so, what and why? Who benefits or suffers most from this policy?

I've attached what I already have done for reference and to write off of.

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Christine Wills Capstone Theoretical Framework In order to critically analyze the proposed policy, two criminological theories namely Social Bond Theory and Strain Theory will be employed to try and justify or debunk the policy. Hirschi’s (1969) Social Bond Theory holds that what keeps people from being social deviants or committing crimes is socializing and being able to form meaningful personal relationships. The theory further indicates that social bonding has four elements namely family attachment, being committed to institutions such as school and employment and social norms, taking part in activities and ascribing value to all these things. The absence of these factors is what leads people to engage in deviant behaviors. Scholars Nijdam, Livingston, Verdun, and Brink (2015) examined how these concepts of social bonding theory contribute to recovery among mental health patients. Their findings revealed that patients who showed great signs of recovery identified these factors as being meaningful and important in their road to recovery. Therefore, having a policy that advocates for healthcare and treatment for inmates with mental health issues are essential in ensuring their recovery. However, as this policy seeks to come up with a safe and sanitary environment that aid in the recovery of inmates, concepts of Hirschi’s Social Bond Theory should be adopted to enhance the effectiveness of the policy. The General Strain Theory (Agnew, 1992), asserts that often people experiencing or who have experienced stressful situations suffer from a lot of distress and in order to cope opt to commit a crime such as engaging in substance abuse. A major principle of the theory is that crime can be motivated by emotion, widening the view on the causes of crime. Therefore while seeking to provide intervention for people with addictive disorders and mental illnesses in prisons the parties involved must have a comprehension of this concept in order to provide mental health services that are decent and humane and comprehensively address all the causative agents. While studying if the General Strain Theory can shed light on the violent behaviors of mental health patients found that individuals who had parents with a drug abuse problem from a young age and gone through stressful times were more likely to engage in violence​("Can General Strain Theory Help Us Understand Violent Behaviors Among People with Mental Illnesses?" 2015)​. Therefore with this information, these correctional institutions can come up with effective strategies that can adequately address the challenges being faced and give these parties a chance to reform. In line with these policies, this theory shows the importance of healthcare and treatment for inmates with mental health and drug substance use such as therapy which gets to the root of the problem and addresses it. Christine Wills Capstone Policy Summary Policy Origins In the past decade, mental illness in correctional facilities has become an important topic with difficulties and problems that need to be addressed. In Plata v. Brown, filed in 2001, the State conceded that deficiencies in prison medical care violated prisoners’ Eighth Amendment rights and stipulated to a remedial injunction. But when the State had not complied with the injunction by 2005, the court appointed a Receiver to oversee remedial efforts. Three years later, the Receiver described continuing deficiencies caused by overcrowding. The judges in both actions granted the request, and the cases were consolidated before a single three-judge court. After hearing testimony and making extensive findings of fact, the court ordered California to reduce its prison population to 137.5% of design capacity within two years ("BROWN v. PLATA", 2011). Due to this case, mental health and treatment in correctional facilities have become an increasingly important issue. As a result, in 2011, the policy of Proposition Statement 56: Mental Health Treatment in Correctional Facilities was created. This policy states when prisoners in need of mental health treatment must be confined in correctional facilities, they are entitled to specific rights while incarcerated. Policy Description This policy goes over the rights to healthcare and treatment for inmates in correctional facilities. People with mental health and substance use conditions need a system to protect themselves and preserve their human rights if and when they are incarcerated. When prisoners in need of mental health treatment must be confined in correctional facilities, they are entitled to the following: The right to adequate medical and mental health care, to protection from harm including staff abuse, and to a facility in which the vulnerable can be protected: a safe, sanitary and humane environment ("Position Statement 56: Mental Health Treatment in Correctional Facilities", 2015). This Policy and those involved ​work to inform the community about the number of inmates with mental illnesses and addictive disorders that are incarcerated and the difficulties involved in providing care to these people and develop and advocate for different strategies addressing these problems. Policy Goals The goals of correctional facility mental health policies are to inform members of law enforcement and correctional groups, judges and attorneys, mental health professionals and advocates, prisoners and their families, the community and the media about the excessive number of persons with mental illnesses and addictive disorders in prisons and jails and the inherent difficulties involved in providing decent and humane care to such persons in these settings and should develop and advocate for effective strategies addressing these problems and use the ability to work with prison reform groups to highlight the treatment and conditions of persons with mental health conditions in prisons and jails and to ensure that everyone with a mental health condition receives decent and humane mental health services while incarcerated ("Position Statement 56: Mental Health Treatment in Correctional Facilities", 2015). This will enhance the wellbeing and personal satisfaction of both prisoners with mental disorders and of the prison population, make correctional facilities into a working environment that advances the general confidence and psychological well-being of jail staff, decrease the possibility reoffending and returning to incarceration, help occupy individuals with mental illnesses from jail to treatment and recovery, and, in time, lessen the expenses of correctional facilities.​Those involved should work with prison reform groups to highlight the treatment and conditions of person with mental health conditions in prisons and jails and to ensure that everyone with a mental health condition receives decent and humane mental health services while incarcerated ​("Position Statement 56: Mental Health Treatment in Correctional Facilities", 2015)​. ...
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richardfontenote
School: Boston College

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Anonymous
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