Government vs. Private Troops

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timer Asked: Mar 5th, 2019
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Please see attachment below, disscusions, four assigments..

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Discussion 1 topic for week 5 -- Prewriting For A Personal Research Narrative: Research Journal

When developing a Personal Research Narrative, there are some things that a writer can do to help create a successful end to the project. One of the best things for a writer to do is create a method that helps to keep track of what is being researched and how that research is developing ideas.  After developing a specific topic, here are some steps a writer can take to help to build a stronger Personal Research Narrative:


Create a daily journal to record the research process


In the journal, post the "things known" about the research topic


In the journal, post questions about the research topic


Create a plan to research the topic

In this discussion topic, you will create a daily journal to collect information on research about the topic, share the research topic, and develop a research plan. Post the first entry of your research journal.  This discussion topic is designed to help you pre-write, to identify, and to develop a plan for the research narrative.

Please access the document at the following link:

291_Research_on_Topic_template.docx

Things known about the research topic

Questions about the research topic

Plans for research 

 

 


Date

Research Results and Findings 

Thoughts on Progress


























 

You can use this document to help you keep a journal on your research.

For this discussion topic, please post a copy of the first entry of your research journal. Please respond generously to at least two of your fellow classmates. Hint: You can use your classmate's responses to help you to build your journal, too.


Discussion 2 topic from week 5 -- Topic and Thesis for the Personal Research Narrative

Go to the following website, Purdue OWL, to learn how to create a thesis for Personal Research Narrative.

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/545/01/

Post your topic and thesis for Personal Research Narrative. Remember that the topic for this paper is up to the writer. However, the topic needs to be specific.

For example, the following topic is too broad: Obesity in America.

A must better and more specific topic is the following: Obesity and the Elderly.

Or The Closing of Privately Owned Prisons and the Benefits to the Criminal Justice System.

This topic will be used for both writing assignment 2 and writing assignment 3.  Your professor will respond to everyone's topic and thesis.  This discussion topic is designed to help you prewrite and brainstorm on a topic and a thesis.

Please complete the following steps:

1. Post your topic

2. Post your thesis 

3. Develop a short summary paragraph that gives the audience a brief tour of the topic or introduces the audience to the topic.

Bergman, L.S. (2010) "Chapter 9: Writing A Personal Research Narrative." Academic Research and Writing. Boston: Longman.










Discussion 3 topic for week 5 -- Reflecting On Topic For The Personal Research Narrative

Now that you have spent some time researching sources on your chosen topic, it is a good time to reflect and write. In discussing the Personal Research Narrative, Bergman (2010) suggests, "Look over your earlier work---notes, summaries, syntheses, and papers---reflecting on how you have modified your thinking about the issue. Think about how you have moved through this process from topic to problem, argument, reasons, and evidence. This usually is a recursive process that seldom moves in a straight line, and your narrative should reflect the real process of the inquiry, not an idealized process."

In this discussion topic, you will write a reflection on the research topic that you've chosen.  This discussion topic is designed to help you continue to develop material for the Personal Research Narrative.

1. Look over the notes and the research journal that you have created for your research topic.

2. Develop a short summary paragraph that gives the audience a brief tour of the topic or introduces the audience to the topic.

3. As you reflect further on the topic, try to identify a time where your ideas about that topic were altered, expanded, or challenged by the ongoing research and writing that you were doing. 

4. In a paragraph, describe that time to your readers. Remember to include references to anything that helped to spark any alteration in your perception of the topic, including sources, conversations, and notes.

5. Please post your material as a response to the discussions. Please provide feedback to your peers.

Bergman, L.S. (2010) "Chapter 9: Writing A Personal Research Narrative." Academic Research and Writing. Boston: Longman.




WEEK FIVE - DEEP DIVE!

THE PERSONAL RESEARCH NARRATIVE

Right now, we get to the "meat and potatoes" of this course - the Personal Research Narrative. It is the biggest, baddest and most valuable grade you will get - 40% of your final grade! That means you must give it your very best. I know it can seem intimidating - but remember it is the story (narrative) of how your thinking changed as you learned more about your topic. Its also about what you discovered, and how it made you wonder about other aspects of the topic, as well as your further investigation to have those questions answered. 

That means: Your topic initial question, (Mercenaries, [ - Topic-- Government vs. Private Troops]), list of sources and research direction WILL change as you move along. Don't be afraid to follow a lead down what may appear to be a footpath away from your original thesis. You are looking for the 'real' story of this topic, the most pressing and contentious debate among scholars, and the issues that will affect the world, our country and the most people. 

As a result, your collection of articles and scholars may also shift and change. Don't throw them away, just have an 'active' list and an 'inactive' list as you continue your investigation. Keep notes in your journal of all that you encounter, the good and the bad, the successes and the failures - and how your thinking on the subject changed.

OUTLINE

This week you will create an outline of your PRN for submission on Sunday. That means you need to clarify the scope and direction of your research, and most likely narrow its focus more acutely so that you can discuss and explore the issue comprehensively in 15 pages of your final PRN. So:


Write one -two sentences for each paragraph, showing what aspect of your issue the paragraph is about, what academic sides are battling over it, and what their different arguments are regarding it.


Make sure you note in one sentence the different directions of research you took at each point.

Remember:

Your mission here is to introduce and engage your reader to your topic and your research process.  Write clearly, tightly and formally, aiming for plain, direct sentences that each address one idea only. Your audience will not be very familiar with your topic, so be sure to define your terms, write out the full titles of acronyms and avoid jargon and clichés like the plague.  Your job is to help the audience follow and understand each step of your research and findings - not whether you agree or disagree with one camp or one opinion. 

Your evaluation of the debate comes at the final paragraph (again for the outline 1 sentence) in which you explain which side of the argument makes the most sense, is the most plausible or the most likely to actually happen. Here also you will summarize how your opinions and attitudes on the topic changed, (or did not change) culminating in this final paragraph.

 Your references section should be indicated in the outline but does not need to be complete. You can write in "looking for a scholar for this issue' or 'still searching for his article' or the like. But make sure your sources are credible, scholarly and peer-reviewed.

ELEMENTS

What I will be looking for in your outline is:

1. A clear starting question and controversy. Each time a question is answered, another emerges to be followed.

2. A well-organized essay in which each fact, argument or issue raised builds upon the next in a logical way.

3. A good spectrum of scholarly opinion, preferably without the extremes of one side or the other. 

4. An engaging and thought -provoking controversy that can be broken into chunks - one per paragraph. 

5. A clear and logical account of your research process and how questions made you look in new directions.

Sound like a plan? 

And since this will be a one-page outline there is no reason on this planet that you should have any trouble submitting it on time. Run it past the EWC before submitting it and for the sake of your grade and yourself - proofread your work aloud to catch typos and errors.

Good luck, good hunting and good cogitation!

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nasir0040
School: University of Maryland

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