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I have included the article "I'm a Canadian, and I'm Applying for US Citizenship". Please look at the instructions and follow


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I’m a Canadian and I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship Maya Kachroo-Levine November 10, 2016 I’ve lived in the U.S. for 23 years, but I didn’t vote in this election. I’m a green card holder, and I was planning to apply for citizenship this year. The naturalization process takes a considerable amount of time (six months at minimum, but often much longer), so by the time I was able to apply, the turnaround time wouldn’t have allowed me to vote in this election. Rather than submitting my application anyway, I decided to wait and ensure the Election Day results went the way I wanted. I joked with my family that I’d submit my citizenship application on Nov. 9, when I knew it was safe. Well, Nov. 9 has come and passed. And I don’t know that it’s safe. Now that Donald Trump is the President-elect, I’m faced with the question: do I still want to become a citizen of the United States of America? I was born in Canada, and I came to the U.S. when I was 2. I currently hold a Canadian passport, and I am working on becoming an Overseas Citizen of India (my mother was born in India and a lot of my family still lives there). I would never relinquish my Canadian passport, a decision I made long before Canadian citizenship became a hot commodity. On the night of the election, the Canadian immigration website crashed, likely a result of frantic voters typing “how to move to Canada” into Google. As someone who has (willingly) been the butt of Canadian jokes for 20 or so years, you’d think I’d feel at least a twinge of validation that people are now desperately flocking to my birth country. I don’t. It just feels overwhelming and disheartening. I love living in the U.S. I was raised in this country. I was educated—kindergarten through college—in the U.S. When people ask me where I’m from, I don’t say Canada or India; I say I’m from Boston. I am (probably) here to stay. As much as moving back to Montreal has crossed my mind lately, most of the people I love are in this country, including my immediate family, my boyfriend and my closest friends. If I’m going to stay, if I’m invested in the U.S. political system, and if I’m eligible to become a citizen (because I’ve now held a green card for five years), it’s time to exercise that privilege. I know what it’s like to enter the green card lottery year after year, be a slave to my visa, and become an all-too-regular face at my local immigration office. It’s frustrating, time-consuming and often degrading. I’ve finally come far enough to qualify for citizenship, which is a privilege I am incredibly fortunate to have, and one that I know millions of immigrants are fighting for. But if I apply for American citizenship tomorrow, I will end up saying the naturalization Oath of Allegiance under President Trump. I will attend my oath ceremony in a room filled with framed photos of our 45th president—a man who has faced multiple sexual assault accusations and threatened to deport millions of immigrants. And to me, that is heartbreaking. Because on a night that I thought would boost our shared faith in this country, my trust and hope were broken instead. There is now a large part of me that feels like I should wait until our President-elect is out of office before I apply to become a citizen. But I think it’s more important that I work hard to become an American so I can participate in the next election. This is not how I wanted to feel when I submitted my naturalization application. I planned to feel energized and hopeful, instead of terrified. I wanted to submit my application with pride, instead of in a hurry because I honestly don’t know what’s going to happen to immigration laws in this country. This President-elect has verbalized his intentions to make strict immigration crackdowns. Conceivably, in the Trump era, I could be stopped in the street as a nonwhite person and asked to produce proof of residency. As much as I detest that part of my hurry to apply for citizenship will be because it may get more challenging after Jan. 20, that is the reality we are now facing. I feel a sense of urgency to become a citizen, which I think I’ve always felt, but I also feel something new: dread. Student Name English March 4, 2019 I'm a Canadian, And I'm Applying for US Citizenship Step 1 , I'm a Canadian, And I'm Applying for US Citizenship", answer one or more of the following questions: 1. Why do you think Kachroo-Levine wants to become a US citizen? 2. What does Kachroo-Levine think is the "privilege" of being a citizen? How did eligible voters use this privilege on election day? 3. If Kachroo-Levine feels "terrified" and filled with "dread" yet still wants to be a citizen, what does this say about her view of the United States? Step 2 1. a. i. 1. 2. 3. b. i. 1. 2. a. 3. a. b. ii. 1. 2. iii. c. i. An effective outline should have a few basic elements. To demonstrate these, I will do so in outline form. You can watch this video for some helpful tips too. Aspects of an effective outline Hierarchy of ideas (structure) Defines the function of each idea Topic sentence: defines a paragraph Major detail: supports the topic sentence and is usually a concept of some kind Minor detail: supports a major detail and is often a specific, concrete example, quote, statistic, or explanation Content: evaluating your ideas Order: there should be a logical way to connect the ideas Chronological: develops along a time line Spatial: develops in a physical space Example: from US regions—West, Mountains, Plains, Midwest, East Coast, South Importance From most to least important From least to most important Quantity: there should be enough evidence to clearly make your point Are there any concepts that need additional explanation or evidence to support? Are there any terms that the reader might not know that need definition? Quality: the points should be specific and easily understood Organization Unity 1. Every point that is made pertains to the thesis ii. Coherence 1. All the points transition well a. Transitions are relationships, so there needs to be an obvious relationship between ideas Step 3 Write a 5 paragraph response essay. For "I'm a Canadian, and I'm Applying for US Citizenship" answer the following: What conceptions of citizenship do you think different groups of voters had in the 2016 presidential election? How do these conceptions affect people in the United States now? ...
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Proff_White
School: University of Virginia

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Outline
Why do you think Kachroo-Levine wants to become a US citizen?
Kachroo-Levine wants to become a United State citizen because she has spent most of
her life in the country.
Besides, Kachroo-Levine does not want to become a slave of her visa, so she wants to
get the United States citizenship. Since she is not a permanent resident of the United
States, she is required to carry her visa with her in all the places she goes to.
What does Kachroo-Levine think is the "privilege" of being a citizen? How did
eligible voters use this privilege on Election Day?
They have the right to exercise their rights by voting in the leaders of their choice and
vote out those who do not meet their expectations.
What conceptions of citizenship do you think different groups of voters had in the
2016 presidential election? How do these conceptions affect people in the United
States now?
During the 2016 presidential elections in the United States there was a heated debate
about the nature of American identity, which are in the country and those who should
be.
During the campaigns there was increased separation in terms of race and partisanship.
Attitudes about immigration, feeling towards the blacks and the feeling towards
Muslims shaped the campaigns.
The American identity was a fundamental question in the presidential elections of
United States in 2016.


Running head: THREE STEP PAPER

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Three Step Paper
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THREE STEP PAPER

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Three Step Paper
Why do you think Kachroo-Levine wants to become a US citizen?
Kachroo-Levine wants to become a United State citizen because she has spent most of
her life in the country. She joined the country when she was two years and she is twenty-three
years now. Being lived the country for twenty-one years ...

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