HST 142 DePaul University The Fate of Islamic Science discussion

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Question Description

Term Paper

The library paper is the final paper. It will deal with a subject chosen by the instructor and posted on

Desire2Learn at least 10 days before it is due. The library paper should be double space and at least 10

pages long. Students are expected to use at least a total of 10 academic references (reference journal

articles or books) in their papers.

The paper will be graded based on 5 criteria: content, language/clarity,

references, organization and completeness


Question:

" After considering the history of the Muslim world in the period between the eleventh and sixteenth centuries, which particular events, processes, and/or encounters would you deem overall the most enduring and most defining? "

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Students have demonstrated a depth and breadth of historical knowledge of specified content when they are able to: 

• explain historical developments in terms of continuity and change;
• describe the relevant political, economic, social or cultural contexts of historical events and developments;
• explain how people have lived, acted and thought in one or more particular historical periods. 

Students have demonstrated historical skills when they are able to:
• analyze and evaluate primary and secondary sources;
• differentiate between historical facts and historical interpretations;
• articulate an historical argument;
• support an interpretation with evidence from primary and secondary sources. 

Students have demonstrated historical thinking when they are able to:
• articulate how geography and regional differences affect the past;
• interpret the complexity and diversity among issues, events, and ideas of the past; 

Tutor Answer

TutorAR
School: Cornell University

Hi, Find attached the paper for your review.Let me know if you need anything edited or changed.Looking forward to working with you again in future.Thank you
Attached.

Outline
The Fate of Islamic Science


Most scholars in Europe who researched the subject about the contributions of
Muslim to technology and science did it with preconception against the Muslims.


I.


They made a number of useful observations in astronomy.
The Importance of Islamic Science
There are some absurd ideas in the past about the science in Islam and
demonstrate that, even when utilizing western criteria, much exceptional science
was conducted in the Islamic Empire.



Some researchers believe that such negative views undermine the role of the
civilization of the Muslim in the scientific advancements and miscasts the relation
between intellectual movements and cultures.

II.


The Maghrib' Fate of Islamic Mathematics
Scholarly studies indicate that the fate of Islamic science is grouped into four
categories which include non-decline ideas, the decline theory, multi-dimensional,
Ibn Khaldun’s, and that the Islamic science advanced up to the sixteenth century.



Certain scholars of the eleventh period published information in astronomy and
mathematics, but the work has not been identified in the present world.



The twelfth and thirteenth scientific and cultural history still remains a vast
unexplored aspect. However, there is enough evidence basing on the modern
study to display the extent of mathematical activities in the Maghrib.

III.

The Persia’s Fate of Islamic Astronomy



There were limitations during this research which include because of its huge
quantity, examining everything related to it was not possible.



A highly and large organized observatory was discovered in Iran towards the
conclusion of the eleventh century.



The observatory of Maragha was known for possessing high-quality instruments,
a vital scientific library with more than four hundred books, a foundry for the
copper apparatus' construction, and adequate work of high-caliber researches
performing there



The question that most scholars require answers to is how could Copernicus
become familiar with the philosophies of Ibn al-Shatir Urdi, and al-Tusi when he
could not read Arabic and the Arabic findings had not been interpreted into Latin.


Running head: THE FATE OF ISLAMIC SCIENCE

The Fate of Islamic Science
Student’s Name
Professor’s Name
Course Title
Date

THE FATE OF ISLAMIC SCIENCE

2

The Fate of Islamic Science
Introduction
Most scholars in Europe who researched the subject about the contributions of Muslim to
technology and science did it with preconception against the Muslims. In this paper, Islamic
science is referred to as science conducted particularly in Arabic and within Islamic civilization’s
context, many people from diverse religious and ethnic backgrounds were engaged in this
undertaking: Persians (Ibn Nawbakht), Christians (Hunayn bin Ishaq), Jews (Masha’allah), and
Sabians (Thabit bin Qurrah). Mostly, Arabic was the scientific language used, but not
compulsory the scientists’ native language, who might have been Turkish or Persian. The
Muslims have attained a lot in science; they advanced algebra to an exact science and started the
foundation of analytical geometry; although they did not invent ciphers, they taught its utilization
(Arabic numerals); Muslims are indisputably the spherical trigonometry and plane’s founders
which did not exist among the Greeks.
The First Subjects
They made a number of useful observations in astronomy. Astronomy, philosophy,
medicine, and mathematics were among the first subjects to attract Muslims' interest. The
civilization of Muslims made a substantial contribution to technology and science. While the
terms Arabic and Islamic science are current historical terms within the Islamic civilization's
context, this science is termed as Islamic because it suits the advanced and growing wants of the
Islamic civilization; its availability was entirely in Arabic, which had substituted Syria; and was
acquainted with a number of Muslim scientists, students, and translators which is increasing.
The Importance of Islamic Science

THE FATE OF ISLAMIC SCIENCE

3

There are some absurd ideas in the past about the science in Islam and demonstrate that,
even when utilizing western criteria, much exceptional science was conducted in the Islamic
Empire (Nasr & Iqbal, 2007). There are scholars who state that although the contribution of
Islamic science is not adequately appreciated, current studies indicate that original and
productive research in science continued up to the sixteenth century in the Islamic set...

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Anonymous
Top quality work from this guy! I'll be back!

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