Hetch Hetchy Valley Response Paper

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Question Description

Please go through the uploaded files to have clear idea of the requirement (Rubric).

  • Summarizing Yosemite’s geologic history and relationship to Hetch Hetchy Valley;
  • Describe the history of the Hetch HetchyWater System, including, but not limited to, why the Hetchy Hetchy Dam was installed, the water distribution system, and who benefits most from water conveyed from this area;
  • Pros and cons of allowing the Hetch Hetchy Dam to remain in place;
  • Controversy surrounding removal of the Hetch Hetchy Dam; and
  • Your position on whether the Hetchy Hetchy Dam should be removed or not. Your 500±25 word paper should:
    •  Read each of the articles on the uploaded file.
    •  Provide at least two arguments supporting your position.
    •  Illustrate each argument with at least one example or explanation from the readings in this Response Paper.
    •  Organize your paper in clear, concise points separated into paragraphs.
    •  If quoting statements from articles, use APA format for citing in paper.

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Geology 140 (Geology + Environment) Response Paper Rubric – Version 1 Spring 2019 Student Name Signature Total Score /50 Student’s Response Paper will be graded based on this rubric, in addition to whether or not directions and prompt was fully addressed (out of a score of 10). Category General Paragraphs Body Organization and Structural Development of Thesis Statement Exceeds Standards (5) Meets Standards (4) Nearly Meets Standards (3) Does Not Meet Standards (2) No Evidence (0)  Name, Date, and Response Paper Topic (i.e., Volcanoes)  500 ± 25 words  Times Roman, 12 pt. font  1 inch margins  Double spaced  Capitalize proper nouns  Numbers 0-9 spelled out; numbers higher than 10 numerical  APA or GSA format followed Under each Heading/Subheading, paragraphs are indented and organized in 3-6 sentence paragraphs. All prompts (questions) fully answered. Evidence of 7 Evidence of 6 Evidence of 5 Evidence of 4 or absent Sentence Structure and Word Usage Paragraphs incorrect length, no indented. Each section and paragraph lacks supporting detail sentences. Not applicable. Not applicable. Each section and paragraph fails to develop the main idea. Not applicable. Writer demonstrates logical and subtle sequencing of ideas through well-developed paragraphs; transitions are used to enhance organization. Section and paragraph development present but not perfected. Logical organization; organization of ideas not fully developed. No evidence of structure or organization. Not applicable. The conclusion is engaging and summarizes the key points of the Response Paper. Sound opinion(s) or recommendation(s) provided. The conclusion restates the thesis and summarizes the Term Paper. Recommendation(s) provided. The conclusion does not adequately restate the thesis orsummarize the Term Paper. Recommendation(s) provided. Absent /5 Spell and grammar check run; corrections made based on spell Spell and grammar check and grammar check. No errors in punctuation, capitalization and run. Minor errors in spelling. punctuation, capitalization and spelling. Mostly follows APA or GSA guidelines. Spell and grammar check run. Major errors in punctuation, capitalization and spelling. Does not follows APA or GSA guidelines. Many errors in sentence structure and word usage. The conclusion does not adequately restate the thesis or summarize the Term Paper. No recommendation(s) provided. Numerous, distracting errors in punctuation, capitalization and spelling. Does not follow APA or GSA guidelines Not applicable. /5 Not applicable. /5 Each section and paragraph has thoughtful supporting detailed sentences that develop the main idea. No errors sentence structure and word usage. No more than one 20-word quote with proper citation for 500 word Response Paper. Paraphrasing accurate with proper citations. Quote(s)/Paraphrasing /5 Paragraphs correct length, but are not indented. Each section and paragraph has sufficient supporting detail sentences that develop the main idea. Conclusion Mechanics Score Almost no errors in sentence structure and word usage. Numerous and distracting errors in sentence structure and word usage One or more 10-word quotes One or more 10+-word One or more 10+-word with proper citations for 500 quotes with correct quotes with incorrect word Response Paper. citations for Response citations for Response Paraphrasing accurate with Paper with 500 words. Paper with less than 500 proper citations. Paraphrasing accurate with words. Paraphrasing correct citations. inaccurate with incorrect citations. /5 /5 /5 One or more 10+-word quotes with incorrect citations for Response Paper with less than 500 words. No paraphrasing. /5 Geology 140 (Geology + Environment), Spring 2019 Response Paper #5 – Surface Water California is a dry state. It often has droughts, which are long periods of time when little rain or snow falls. Since we all need water to survive, getting enough water is always an issue in California. One source of water is found in the snow of the Sierra Mountain Range. The Hetch Hetchy Reservoir in Yosemite National Park provides San Francisco and the surrounding areas with some of the highest quality drinking water found in the world. Hetch Hetchy is a Miwok word that means “grass with edible seeds.” The Miwok are one of the many native peoples that lived in California for thousands of years. A reservoir is a large area like a lake or a big tank that reserves or collects water in one place so that it can be used later. Up until the mid-1800s, people in San Francisco gathered fresh water from local streams, wells and springs. The Gold Rush of 1849 increased San Francisco’s population from 1,000 to 25,000 people! The local springs and wells could no longer provide enough water for the growing community. People had to buy water from barrels that were carried in carts, or slung across the back of a donkey. Water was expensive; it cost $1 a bucket, which equals about $26 today! As San Francisco continued to grow, water was getting harder to come by. So, in 1857 the city dammed the mouth of Lobos Creek in the Presidio, as a way to help provide more water to local residents. A dam is a barrier that stops the flow of water in a river so that the water can collect into a large area. This water can then be released for a variety of uses in the area, or moved somewhere else through pipes and channels. It can also be released in dry times of the year when it doesn’t rain. Two million gallons of water a day were piped from Lobos Creek and pumped to reservoirs on Russian Hill. Today, San Francisco uses about 85 million gallons a day. It has 13 reservoirs and 7 tanks, storing 440 million gallons of water— enough to last six days in an emergency! On April 18, 1906, a huge earthquake hit San Francisco, where almost 400,000 people then lived. Fires broke out and for three days and nights, the city burned; 25,000 homes and other buildings were destroyed. The earthquake broke the main water pipes, so there wasn’t enough water available to fight the fires, and more than half the city was left homeless. This wasn’t the first time a fire destroyed San Francisco, but for city leaders, it was the last straw! San Francisco needed a much larger water supply in order to meet the needs of the booming population, and to keep the city safe from another disaster. City leaders decided to dam the Tuolumne River so that the Hetch Hetchy valley could become a reservoir that would hold a huge amount of water. This water could then be piped to San Francisco. Not everyone supported this idea however, including John Muir. He was an environmentalist who started the Sierra Club and opposed this project for years. In 1913, the U.S. Congress passed The Raker Act. This law gave San Francisco the rights to use water from the Tuolumne River. This meant the city could dam the river 1 and flood the Hetch Hetchy valley to create a reservoir that would provide the growing city and its surroundings with fresh water to meet all their needs. In order to build the dam, a railroad was first built to carry all the heavy machinery and supplies up the steep mountain. This railroad took two years to build and was 68 miles long! In 1923, after working day and night for nearly four years, workers completed the O’Shaughnessy Dam. It became a source of hydroelectric power. This is a clean form of energy made from the force of water as it falls down from the top of a dam and turns turbines, or engines, that create electricity. San Francisco government buildings and other agencies outside of the city use this clean, “green” power today! In order to move or transport water from the new Hetch Hetchy Reservoir to San Francisco, an aqueduct was built. An aqueduct is a canal or series of large pipes that connect the source of water to its final destination. This system took 21 years to build! In 1934, the first waters from Hetch Hetchy finally reached the San Francisco area, traveling 167 miles downhill with the help of gravity. While the force of gravity has been used for thousands of years to move water through aqueducts, the Hetch Hetchy system was one of the biggest gravity aqueducts ever built. Not only that, but by using gravity to move the water, very little energy is needed to get the water to our faucets. Compare this to the rest of California where almost 20% of all the energy our state uses is needed to transport water from one place to another! Today, Hetch Hetchy provides water to 2.4 million people in San Francisco and the Greater Bay Area. The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission manages the Hetch Hetchy system and works to help protect natural resources and conserve water. Since California is a dry state, it is important that we save or conserve water so that we have enough for people and wildlife, and enough to keep our rivers healthy, our farmland productive and our businesses successful! (From Hetch Hetchy, The Story of San Francisco’s Water, San Francisco Water Power Sewer) To respond to the prompt, review the following informational sources: Yosemite’s Geologic History (4:20) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ij7DU6VQBZI&t=1s Hetch Hetchy: Yosemite’s Lost Valley (17:13) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eu2kwWGoNZU Hetch Hetchy Water System – Legendary Past, Visionary Future (9:21) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XerSPsKQcg&t=194s Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System (13:59) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eX7lH1QJvxE National Park Service Fact Sheet https://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/upload/hetchhetchy-sitebull.pdf How Hetch Hetchy Valley’s Natural Beauty Was Sacrified to Quench SF’s Thirst San Francisco Chronicle, updated January 16, 2018 https://www.sfchronicle.com/thetake/article/How-Hetch-Hetchy-Valley-s-natural-beauty-was-12496800.php Hetch Hetchy Environmental Debates 2 National Archives, The Center for Legislative Archives https://www.archives.gov/legislative/features/hetch-hetchy Prompt • Summarizing Yosemite’s geologic history and relationship to Hetch Hetchy Valley; • Describe the history of the Hetch Hetchy Water System, including, but not limited to, why the Hetchy Hetchy Dam was installed, the water distribution system, and who benefits most from water conveyed from this area; • Pros and cons of allowing the Hetch Hetchy Dam to remain in place; • Controversy surrounding removal of the Hetch Hetchy Dam; and • Your position on whether the Hetchy Hetchy Dam should be removed or not. Your 500±25 word paper should:      Read each of the articles above. Provide at least two arguments supporting your position. Illustrate each argument with at least one example or explanation from the readings in this Response Paper. Organize your paper in clear, concise points separated into paragraphs. If quoting statements from articles, use APA format for citing in paper. 3 ...
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Tutor Answer

Jkennish
School: Carnegie Mellon University

I appreciate working with you! In case of any further edits, please do not hesitate to let me know! See you soon! Remember me as always! Would love and appreciate to work with you in the future! Goodbye

Hetch-Hetchy Outline
• Summarizing Yosemite’s
• Describe the history of

geologic history and relationship to Hetch-Hetchy Valley;

the Hetch HetchyWater System, including, but not limited to, why

the Hetchy-Hetchy Dam was installed, the water distribution system, and who benefits
most from water conveyed from this area;
• Pros

and cons of allowing the Hetch Hetchy Dam to remain in place;

• Controversy surrounding
• Your

removal of the Hetch Hetchy Dam; and

position on whether the Hetchy-Hetchy Dam should be removed or not.


Running head: RESPONSE PAPER

1

Response Paper
Student
Institution
Date

RESPONSE PAPER

2

Hetchy Hetchy water system was first discovered by the American Indians...

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Anonymous
Top quality work from this guy! I'll be back!

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