Are intelligence and achievement different? Why or why not?

Psychology
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Are intelligence and achievement different? Why or why not?

Sep 12th, 2015

Thank you for the opportunity to help you with your question! IF you have any clarification, please don't hesitate to ask and I will do my best to answer. ++++++++++++

Yes, intelligence and achievement are different; however, implicit theories on intelligence have concluded that intelligence is a predictor of achievement. This means that the more intelligent a person is, the higher the chances that that person’s achievements will be greater compared to a person who is less intelligent.

This also means that intelligence is not a necessary factor for achievement. A person can achieve a lot of things without that person being labelled as intelligent. This is supported by studies that show that about 95% of children who were identified with mental retardation can actually pursue and therefore, achieve academic studies, jobs, and independent life.


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Sep 13th, 2015

It needs a reference

Sep 13th, 2015

Okay. Please give me a moment to revise the tutorial.

Sep 13th, 2015

thank you

Sep 13th, 2015

It's my pleasure.

Sep 13th, 2015

[Updated tutorial]

Yes, intelligence and achievement are different; however, implicit theories on intelligence have concluded that intelligence is a predictor of achievement. This means that the more intelligent a person is, the higher the chances that that person’s achievements will be greater compared to a person who is less intelligent. The study made by Adeoye and Emeke (2010) looked at the direct impact of intelligence particularly emotional intelligence on academic achievement in English Language. The researchers concluded that the emotional intelligence of a student “affect academic achievement positively not only during the year they are taught, but during the years that follow as well” (Adeoye and Emeke, 2010, p. 218).

This also means that intelligence is not a necessary factor for achievement. A person can achieve a lot of things without that person being labelled as intelligent. This is supported by studies that show that about 95% of children who were identified with mental retardation can actually pursue and therefore, achieve academic studies, jobs, and independent life.

Reference [I accessed below from ProQuest. I can provide a copy if you need it.]

Adeoye, H. & Emeke, A. E. (2010). Emotional intelligence and self-efficacy as determinants of academic achievement in english language among students in oyo state senior secondary schools. Ife Psychologia, 18(1): 206-220.


Sep 13th, 2015

Thank you very much.

Sep 13th, 2015

You're welcome!

Sep 13th, 2015

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