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Humanities

SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology

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Part I: Data

In about one page (the first page), you will thickly describe an empirical event from your own life.In other words, you will tell a real story about something that actually happened in your life.Tell a story about yourself.Describe only the things in and of the situation that are relevant to your analysis.Your story should be empirically accurate, that is, something that actually happened (think: non-fiction, not fiction).This should be about one page, maybe a page and a half.

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Part of the course involves writing a detailed, empirical, and analytical reflexive analysis that sociologically analyzes an empirical story from your own life. Your story will involve a real situation or set of situations. Think about it this way: What have you experienced outside of class that made you think about the course material? This assignment is a place to show that you are engaged with the course material and discussions and can apply sociological analysis to your own life. The challenge here is to see whether you can go substantially beyond the lectures, discussions, and in-class activities to offer your own unique analyses and insights. Your Reflexive Analysis entry will be typed, between three and four pages long (12 point font, 1” margins all around, Arial font), and double-spaced. Analyses will be graded on relevance, critical thinking, and connections and analysis beyond what is covered in class. *Adapted from Packard, Josh. 2013. The Impact of Racial Diversity in the Classroom: Activating the Sociological Imagination.” Teaching Sociology 41(2): 144-158. Your Reflexive Analysis: Part I: Data In about one page (the first page), you will thickly describe an empirical event from your own life. In other words, you will tell a real story about something that actually happened in your life. Tell a story about yourself. Describe only the things in and of the situation that are relevant to your analysis. Your story should be empirically accurate, that is, something that actually happened (think: non-fiction, not fiction). This should be about one page, maybe a page and a half. Remember that strong writing, and storytelling, is rich with “thick” description that takes the reader there. This is your goal. Clifford Geertz brilliantly describes the difference between a wink and a blink. This is similar to the difference between spit and saliva. The difference is social. Your descriptions will be so thick that the reader could tell the difference between a wink and a blink. Your story will be detailed and coherent. Think about it this way; when people tell other people stories about some previous situation in which something was absolutely hilarious, they often have difficulty thickly describing the situation and eventually find themselves saying, “Well, I guess you had to be there….” Strong writing, and storytelling, is rich with thick description that takes the reader there. This is your goal. It isn’t that you’ll be paying more attention to detail than you’ve ever done before in your life, it is that you’ll be paying more meaningful attention to only the most relevant details than you’ve ever done before in your life. Be precise. Part II: Analysis Then, you’ll apply any concept(s), theory, or theories from our class meetings and/or readings to the story you describe. Pick a relevant sociological concept (e.g., stratification, inequality, power), set of concepts (e.g., class, status, party), theory (e.g., strain theory), or whole theoretical paradigm (e.g., world-systems theory, symbolic interactionism), and use it/them to make sociological sense of your story. You own the story. It is yours. You lived it. Now, own it in a new way by explaining it with sociology. Keep it simple. Make it remarkably detailed, and make sure you’re confident about the accuracy and appropriateness of your application. Applying course content to your story means you will use content from the course in order to examine and analyze your story. Define sociological concepts and/or outline sociological theoretical perspectives relevant to your analysis first. Define these things so clearly and explicitly that someone not enrolled in our class or someone not familiar with sociology could totally understand it. Then, use this sociological content to examine and analyze your story. In other words, explicitly and clearly explain what was sociologically “going on” in the story you previously described by using sociological tools.
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Attached.

Running Head: MY LIFE AS A RADIOLOGIST

My Life as a Radiologist
Institutional Affiliation
Date

1

MY LIFE AS A RADIOLOGIST

2

Part I
A time comes when you are about to get that hard worked promotion you have
worked for many years to earn. The time is here, and this is the moment that you say
goodbye to olden days of difficulties, having trouble to commute to work, being unable
to manage your bills and people looking down on you. Many are times that we as
humans need to get the feeling of securely living the life that we have always worked
and wanted to live but what are the challenges that face us in every day in ensuring that
we live up to our dreams? This is the story of my life!
As a radiologist I worked day and night in one of the health centers in town and
the whole process incorporated tiresome long days of engaging the patients having to
secure appointments, meeting with different people, and ensuring the ultimate
satisfaction of the clients that I came across. Fieldwork was a true definition of my job
and every fortnight we had to move our camps to the nearby neighborhood as a way of
cor...


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