How does classical conditioning differ from operant conditioning?

Psychology
Tutor: None Selected Time limit: 1 Day

How does classical conditioning differ from operant conditioning? Which do you think is more effective in the learning and modification of behavior? Provide an example.

Oct 5th, 2015

Thank you for the opportunity to help you with your question!

Classical conditioning relies on an unconditional stimulus (for example, salivating at the sight of food) – a stimulus that gets a uniform and invariable response. The new response  (for example salivating to the sound of a bell)is then tied to this by making the new stimulus occur repeatedly and together with the unconditional stimulus. Then the new response occurs without the need for the unconditional stimulus.

Operant conditioning does not need an unconditional stimulus. It relies on reward (or punishment) of the behavior we want to occur by repeatedly rewarding or punishing when the desired behaviour occurs.

Operant conditioning is usually better because it is difficult to control or manipulate an unconditional stimulus, but is easier to reward or punish the required behavior when it occurs. For instance a child can be stopped from bed-wetting or by crying when the light is turned off by giving a reward but it would be difficult to use classical conditioning method.


Please let me know if you need any clarification. I'm always happy to answer your questions.
Oct 5th, 2015

Studypool's Notebank makes it easy to buy and sell old notes, study guides, reviews, etc.
Click to visit
The Notebank
...
Oct 5th, 2015
...
Oct 5th, 2015
Dec 10th, 2016
check_circle
Mark as Final Answer
check_circle
Unmark as Final Answer
check_circle
Final Answer

Secure Information

Content will be erased after question is completed.

check_circle
Final Answer