NorthEastern Ethical Leadership Class Experiences & Teacher Behaviors

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Hi,

Please Finish the Part XI on page 6 on syllabus(Final Reflection Paper) based on my final team paper and your own opinions. I uploaded my team final paper for you.



X. Team Project

Determine as a team a particular topic or area of professional ethics that is of interest to you. Alternatively, you can focus on a particular case study of ethics and an organization, or ethics as they relate to a particular leader. In the project, be sure to integrate how different ethical theories and moral values would help provide various lenses to address the issue.

Ultimately, please be prepared to define what the proper course of action should be as it relates to your topic. In the past, students have addressed issues such as Whistleblowing, Financial Practices, Codes of Conduct, etc. You have latitude to define this area. We will work together to define and refine the proposal and the work in general.

Employing numerous examples, the team is required to bring your paper to life through work-world illustrations. The final deliverable is one team-generated document of 8-10 pages. Each team will present its work on the final session on class.

XI. Final Reflection Paper (Individual)

You are encouraged to incorporate the following suggestion in your paper. Do not feel limited to this suggestion, but try to address it in some manner.

Reflective Journal Framework

1. What I have experienced in class (readings, class discussions and online discussions in BlackBoard, as well as team experiences

2. What I think and feel about the readings, discussions, etc.

3. What I learned from the readings class discussion, etc.

4. How I can

use this learning in the future

6

Note: Each Final Reflective Paper is to include a section on “Asking the Right Questions.” Asking the right questions is the key to being a moral professional – not simply seeking to find “the right” answers; therefore:

What are the 5-10 key questions moral professionals should ask of themselves, of others, and about their environments? (This section is part of your Final Reflective Paper.)

Reflective paper length: 6-10 pages

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Ethical Leadership LDR 6135 CRN#: 20210 Winter 2019 Instructor: Robert V. McGrath, MBA, Ph.D. Email: r.mcgrath@northeastern.edu Office Hours: Before and After Class, by Appointment, Email, Text, and Phone Location: TBD Phone/Text: 978-729-3005 Course Delivery: Blended Times: Wednesdays/5:50 PM to 8 PM I. Course Description Students will examine the various ethical and moral issues arising in contemporary organizational activities that affect individuals, groups, and society. Philosophical theories of ethics will be discussed in the context of contemplating and acting upon moral challenges and issues. Moral values will be applied through case analysis and facilitated class discussions, at the individual and group levels. In this course, we will create a flexible and applicable template to approaching and resolving ethical dilemmas. Students will be asked to be reflective practitioners in fostering an ethical lens on the world of organizational dynamics and personal action. This course treats ethics in the context of leadership decision-making, recognizing the importance of making sound ethical judgments in a complex world. Course Overview: The first question to address in this course, is what is “ethics” and what is “morality”? One key distinction is that morality focuses more on social norms and institutional conventions of the immediate culture and society. Ethics, on the other hand, is more universalistic with deeper philosophical roots and more transcendent impact on thought and behavior. Ethics is an examination of various sets of values that people hold. Ethics examines individuals, their dilemmas, decisions and behaviors broadly over situation, society and culture. Ethical leadership is on one hand highly personal – the development of moral beliefs is built from family upbringing, religion, and defining moments that emerge from a person’s own choices in life. On the other hand, ethics are largely affected by social influences arising from societal codes and norms. To be an ethical leader is to draw from one’s own set of moral beliefs, recognizing the social context of these beliefs, and at the same time appreciating and embracing the reality that each person brings to the present moment a uniquely constructed set of moral assumptions and values. Ethics is a branch of philosophy known as moral philosophy. Any philosophy attempts to answer basic questions about essential matters of human life and experience. Ethics is also fundamentally practical, in other words, we consider ethics to be a matter of application and 1 practice. Integrating the philosophy of ethics, the concepts and topics of ethics, with the complicated and risky decisions that have real consequences on others, and the ongoing development of ourselves as moral agents, are central to this course. II. Course Learning Outcomes By the completion of the course, students will have the opportunity to:  To define ethical leadership;  To apply the major philosophical theories of ethics and morality;  To develop insight into the assumptions that underlie ethical decisions;  To generate an understanding of the ethical dimension of organizational situations and dilemmas, as well as decisions and behaviors;  To reflect on one’s own moral values;  To demonstrate progress in narrowing the gap between your espoused theories of ethics and your actual practice as an ethical leader;  To reflect on one’s own experiences in organizational life that have posed ethical dilemmas;  To integrate analytical and critical thinking with action in real time;  To create a personal model of ethical leadership and decision making. III. Participation/In-Class Discussion The objective of class discussion is to draw students into discussion on the course materials and their own experiences. Linking theory and practice is a core aspect of this and your other courses. Critical thinking and critical analysis is reflected by going beyond the surface level of analysis, but instead, probing deeper to discover why we see what we see. Participation in discussion board activity will be evaluated through the rubrics of PREPARATION, ACTIVE INVOLVEMENT, and PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIOR:  Preparation o read the chapters in advance and make notes o link theory to actual experience or cases you have examined o think about real-life examples illustrating the concepts of the class  Active involvement o provide constructive feedback to the class material (ask questions, share your ideas and additional perspective about a topic or issue, be interested and open to different points of views and ideas) o demonstrate proactive positions toward individual and group activities and class discussions  Professional behavior o Express positive attitudes and acceptance of other members of the class and their ideas o Respect the instructor and other students through considering other’s viewpoints but feel free to disagree or provide an alternative position. It is possible to agree to disagree, or disagree without being disagreeable, sarcastic, condescending, or hostile. 2 IV. Teaching and Learning Strategies This course will be taught using a highly participatory format requiring significant effort and energies spent on discussing, observing, and analyzing course material. This is not a lecture course in which you passively absorb material and recite it on an examination, nor does the professor serve as "expert." My role is to create the environment and the conditions for you to explore ethical assumptions and actions faced by leaders (including yourself). The course experience provides the potential for learning and my objective is to facilitate, along with your learning team, your learning process. The following are the teaching methods we will use: 1. Readings For most of our class sessions, book chapters, supplemental readings, and cases will be assigned. Giving the participative nature of this course, it is imperative that you read the material closely before you engage in our discussions of ethics and social responsibility so that you can engage knowledgeably with your peers. 2. Participation/Discussion Each week you will be asked to participate in discussions. These exchanges provide you with an opportunity to interact with and learn from your peers. Therefore, every student is expected to contribute to the learning of others in class. While class attendance is deemed critical for success in this course, mere attendance does not constitute high quality participation that will enhance your own learning as well as that of the others in class. Effective participation that fosters your own learning and your peers’ requires preparation and a willingness to engage in a vigorous discussion of ethics and leadership. As instructor and facilitator, I will do my best to distribute airtime evenly, but if you have an important comment to make and have not been given a chance, feel free to get your contribution into the discussion. Feel free to notify me of your interest in contributing to the discussion. Your participation will be evaluated using the following criteria: 1. Quality – Contributions that raise interesting questions that go beyond a simple restatement of the facts taken from a reading; that are accurate, i.e. the course concepts are described correctly; that are analytical and insightful, rather than generic and unsubstantiated, and; that are grounded in theory and/or experience. 2. Quantity – The frequency of your comments. Being active and providing insights, while at the same time recognizing that often “less is more:” that your contributions are clear and concise, rather than obscure and rambling. 3. Process: How constructively your comments fit in the development of the discussion; extend the discussion meaningfully and further our understanding of the issues being explored; and are constructive and show respect for the others involved in the discussion as well as the learning environment in general. 3 3. Learning Teams Each student will become part of a four-person Learning Team that will have the following objectives: 1. To support and challenge you in a safe environment in all aspects of this course: readings, discussions, projects, etc. 2. To provide the opportunity for a truly collaborative environment of learning from each other. 3. To help to understand the core concepts of the course and how they apply in practice. 4. To provide an environment for the case studies examined in ethical analysis. 5. To collaborate on a team project. The instructor will provide the teams with facilitation support. This will include observing the teams during the learning team meetings and providing feedback both to individual members and to the team as a whole on its interpersonal processes. The facilitator is not the team's leader. Rather, the facilitator, through process consultation, will seek to ensure that the members of the team maintain ownership of their own agenda and increase their capacity for reflection on the consequences of their own actions. Team members will choose how they wish to share the team leadership to produce the most value from the experience. The instructor will provide suggestions during each class for agenda topics and process deliberations that will serve to advance the development of the team toward a highly functional state by the end of the term. V. Required Textbook Brincat, C., and Wike, V. (2000). Morality and the Professional Life. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall. ISBN: 0-13-915729. Note: Supplemental Readings and Resources will be posted on BlackBoard. VI. Course Methodology Each week, you will be expected to: 1. Review course syllabus and the week's learning objectives; 2. Complete all assigned readings; 3. Participate in the Discussion Board, if applicable, and; 4. Complete and submit all assignments by the due dates. 4 VII: Discussion Board As this course is a blended delivery, there is a required Discussion Board component through Blackboard. As indicated on the syllabus, in response to the posted Discussion Questions, you are required to post one primary and one response post. The Primary Post is due by midnight on Saturdays, and; The Response Post is due by Tuesdays at midnight. Timing is important and no exceptions will be made. Your posts should be direct and succinct: approximately four 200-300 characters per post. Please see the course schedule for specific due dates. See Addendum: Writing Quality Rubric All work other than the Discussion Board and all other written assignments must follow either APA or MLA format. Here is a reliable guide on the following format: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/ VIII. Grading Individual Attendance and Participation Team Project (Written 25%/ Oral 15%) Personal Reflection on Ethical Leadership 30% 40% 30% Grading Structure: Letter Grade A AB+ B BC+ C CF Low 94 90 87 84 80 76 73 70 0 High 100 93 89 86 83 79 75 72 69 Late Assignment Submission Policy: For each day an assignment is late, there will be a 10% reduction in the grade for that assignment. At the instructor’s discretion, with prior approval, an exception may be made granted for significant extenuation circumstances. 5 Be sure to include your name on all your work. Important: Proof-reading is required (not just spell-check). Please see the College of Professional Studies website for a complete listing of all resources available to students to support students and enhance their academic experience. IX. Guidelines on Assignments Times New Roman 12 Font Double Spaced Pages Numbers Proofread APA or MLA formatted X. Team Project Determine as a team a particular topic or area of professional ethics that is of interest to you. Alternatively, you can focus on a particular case study of ethics and an organization, or ethics as they relate to a particular leader. In the project, be sure to integrate how different ethical theories and moral values would help provide various lenses to address the issue. Ultimately, please be prepared to define what the proper course of action should be as it relates to your topic. In the past, students have addressed issues such as Whistleblowing, Financial Practices, Codes of Conduct, etc. You have latitude to define this area. We will work together to define and refine the proposal and the work in general. Employing numerous examples, the team is required to bring your paper to life through work-world illustrations. The final deliverable is one team-generated document of 8-10 pages. Each team will present its work on the final session on class. XI. Final Reflection Paper (Individual) You are encouraged to incorporate the following suggestion in your paper. Do not feel limited to this suggestion, but try to address it in some manner. Reflective Journal Framework 1. What I have experienced in class (readings, class discussions and online discussions in BlackBoard, as well as team experiences 2. What I think and feel about the readings, discussions, etc. 3. What I learned from the readings class discussion, etc. 4. How I can use this learning in the future 6 Note: Each Final Reflective Paper is to include a section on “Asking the Right Questions.” Asking the right questions is the key to being a moral professional – not simply seeking to find “the right” answers; therefore: What are the 5-10 key questions moral professionals should ask of themselves, of others, and about their environments? (This section is part of your Final Reflective Paper.) Reflective paper length: 6-10 pages 7 XI. Schedule (subject to minor revision) Date Week 1 Wednesday, February 20th to Tuesday February 26th Week 2 Wednesday, February 27th to Tuesday March 5th Readings Chapters 1, 2 MPL, Chapter 1: What Professions and Professionals Are MPL, Chapter 2: What Morality Is MPL, Chapter 3: What Professional Ethics Is Class Activities Introductions Deliverables Student Information Sheets Course Overview Syllabus Review Team Formation Discussion Question #1 p. 80 – 81 Discussion Board Cases 1 and 3 See guidelines for case analysis top of page 80. Team Project Time Week 3 Wednesday, March 6th to Tuesday, March 12th MPL, Chapter 5: Moral Theories Discussion Board Case p. 114 Case 2, p. 134 Team Project Time Team Project proposal (2 pages) See guidelines at the end of this document 8 MPL, Chapter 6: Week 4 Moral Analysis and Case Solving Wednesday, March th 13 to Tuesday, March MPL, Chapter 7: 19th Integrity Case p. 163. The Unhappy Social Worker Interim Report of Team Project (3-4 pages) Case #1: The Boss who will Cover For you Discussion Board Team Project Time MPL, Chapter 8: Respect for Persons Week 5 Wednesday, March 20th to Tuesday, March MPL, Chapter 12: 26th Responsibility Cases 2 and 3, pages 212-213 Discussion Board Case 2 page 274 Team Project Time Week 6 Wednesday, March 27th to Saturday March, 30th Team Projects Due with Presentation (8-10 pages, see guidelines) Personal Reflection Papers XII. Online Communication Policy At the heart of online learning is the commitment that the instructor and students make to full engagement to the teaching and learning process. Online communication is as important as that in class. Studies show that at least 80% of communication is nonverbal. With our format, there is limited in-class communication. Thus, in the written work the words take on greater importance. Online is a place to engage actively - not just on the subject matter, but how we leverage technology in an interactive way to present ourselves as “real people, in a real course, in a real learning environment.” XIII. Academic Honesty and Integrity Statement The University views academic dishonesty as one of the most serious offenses that a student can commit while in college and imposes appropriate punitive sanctions on violators. Here are some examples of academic dishonesty. While this is not an all-inclusive list, we hope this will help you to understand some of the things instructors look for. The following is excerpted from the University’s policy on academic honesty and integrity; the complete policy is available at www.neu.edu/cps. 9       Cheating – intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information or study aids in an academic exercise. This may include use of unauthorized aids (notes, texts) or copying from another student’s exam, paper, computer disk, etc. Fabrication – intentional and unauthorized falsification, misrepresentation, or invention of any data, or citation in an academic exercise. Examples may include making up data for a research paper, altering the results of a lab experiment or survey, listing a citation for a source not used, or stating an opinion as a scientifically proven fact. Plagiarism – intentionally representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any academic exercise without providing proper documentation by source by way of a footnote, endnote or intertextual note. Unauthorized collaboration – Students, each claiming sole authorship, submit separate reports, which are substantially similar to one another. While several students may have the same source material, the analysis, interpretation and reporting of the data must be each individual’s. Participation in academically dishonest activities – Examples include stealing an exam, using a pre-written paper through mail order or other services, selling, loaning or otherwise distributing materials for the purpose of cheating, plagiarism, or other academically dishonest acts; alternation, theft, forgery, or destruction of the academic work of others. Facilitating academic dishonesty – Examples may include inaccurately listing someone as co-author of paper who did not contribute, sharing a take home exam, taking an exam or writing a paper for another student. XIV. Northeastern Online Policies and Procedures For comprehensive information please go to www.neu.edu/cps XV. Northeastern Online Copyright Statement Northeastern Online is a registered trademark of Northeastern University. All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. This course material is copyrighted and all rights are reserved by Northeastern Online. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, optical, chemical, manual, or otherwise, without the express prior written permission of Northeastern Online, 2019. Addendum: Writing Quality Rubric I. Grammar, Mechanics, Usage 10 Scoring Level High level of Proficiency Grading: A to A- Moderate Proficiency – Grading: B+, B, or B- Minimal Proficiency Grading: C+, C, or C- Clarity and Coherence While there may be minor errors, the paper Sentences are follows normal conventions of spelling and structured and words grammar throughout and has been are chosen to carefully proofread. Appropriate communicate ideas conventions for style and format are used clearly. consistently throughout the writing sample. Sequencing of ideas Demonstrates thoroughness and within paragraphs and competence in documenting sources; the transitions between reader would have little difficulty referring paragraphs make the back to cited sources. writer’s points easy to follow. Frequent errors in spelling, grammar (such Sentence structure as subject/verb agreements and tense), and/or word choice sentence structure and/or other writing sometimes interfere conventions distract the reader. Writing with clarity. does not consistently follow appropriate Needs to improve style and/or format. sequencing of ideas within paragraphs and Source documentation is incomplete. It transitions between may be unclear which references are direct paragraphs to make the quotes a ...
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School: University of Maryland

Attached.

Running head: ETHICAL LEADERSHIP

1

Ethical Leadership: Final Reflection Paper
Student’s Name
Institution
Date

ETHICAL LEADERSHIP
2
Ethical Leadership: Final Reflection Paper
Introduction
The class context provides a profound reflection of ethical leadership and morality given the
diversity of personalities that cut across students and teachers. Different students stem from
diverse moral backgrounds and likewise the teachers. The portrayal of character in our behavior
which again largely determines how we approach issues tells more about our ethics. Teachers
represent the top leadership in class as leadership still steps down to leadership among students,
however, at whichever capacity of leadership, there are followers who study and learn the ethics
of their leaders and from this we can be able to certainly conclude from the behavior the ethical
and moral aspects that standout from our class. Most importantly, the various class activities
such as the readings, class discussions as well as team experiences are fundamental avenues that
largely form our perceptions towards class ethics; this is because they provide interaction
platforms that enable us to learn more about personal behaviors and be able to judge the
personal, group and the society’s standards of ethics. As such, this paper provides a reflection of
my class experiences in readings, class discussions and online discussions, as well as the team
experiences; what I think about them and most significantly, what I learned from them. I will
also give a perspective on ‘asking the right questions.’
Class experiences
As far as ethics are concerned, the general class experience is one that is dominated by high
ethical standards which emanates from recognition of class diversity and the core values that
fundamentally encourage the culture of universality. Most of the class activities which entail
class readings, discussions and teams are a reflection of these ethical values. In my class, I have
never signaled any element of discrimination of whatever kind. The class being guided by the
teachers, it has always provided equal opportunities for education excellence and progress for
everyone regardless of our ethnic div...

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