Information Technology Case Memo

Anonymous
account_balance_wallet $10

Question Description

Case Memo - Due on Saturday by 11:55pm Pacific.

For this case memo - please write a case memo for one of the following cases:

City of Pittsburgh – OR – SurveyMonkey

Please DO NOT choose the same topic that you wrote your critical analysis on earlier.

You will need to write a Case Memo for the company using the Case Memo template provided in this course.

Please write this ONE PAGE Case Memo as if you are writing this with modern technologies and solutions being used in 2019. In this Case Memo, please address the following:

  1. If you were going to make an investment in new technologies - would you recommend moving forward? Waiting? Why?
  2. How much more do you think you should spend for potential solutions?
  3. What are the key benefits for your recommendations?.
  4. What do you believe the requirements for the investments in architecture to support your vision?
  5. Please include supporting materials in your Exhibit.


Please submit this Case Memo in Sakai as a Microsoft Word or PDF document under the Assignments section "Case Memo - City of Pittsburgh – OR – SurveyMonkey".

Unformatted Attachment Preview

To: Text Toshifumi Suzuki, Chairman and CEO of Seven-Eleven Japan Co., Ltd. From: Date: Sebastian Calabro (See Exhibit 1 for Bio) / CIO of Seven-Eleven Japan Co., Ltd. March 18, 2016 SUBJECT: SALES LEVERAGING MOBILE TECHNOLOGY TO ATTRACT NEW CUSTOMERS AND INCREASE This MEMO recommends the following actions (See Exhibit 2 Initiatives Grid): 1) Leverage Near Field Communication (NFC) capabilities found in most new mobile handsets to conduct payment transactions (See Exhibit 2 Initiatives 1). 2) Utilize mobile marketing to attract and retain customers (See Exhibit 2 Initiatives 2). 3) Create a customer loyalty program that converges mobile payments and mobile marketing (See Exhibit 2 Initiatives 3). Funding for Initiatives 1, 2 and 3 is ¥30MM for mobile app development and ¥10MM for NFC hardware for each store. These actions will attract new customers and increase sales. Background • Adapting to changing consumer trends has been the focus of Seven-Eleven Japan Co., Ltd. since it was established in 1973. • Seven-Eleven Japan currently has 17,491 stores and plans to expand to 18,572 stores by 2020. • Since its inception, Seven-Eleven Japan has leveraged information technology (IT) and distribution systems to continually meet customers’ needs. • Seven-Eleven Japan is looking for ways to attract more customers and sales. Recommendation Obtain Toshifumi Suzuki’s authorization by April 1, 2016. • • Funding for Initiatives 1, 2 and 3 is ¥30MM for mobile app development and ¥10MM for NFC hardware for each store. Execute Initiatives 1, 2 and 3 per implementation schedule (See Exhibit 3 Implementation Schedule). Basis for Recommendation 1. Initiative 1: Removes friction from the sales process and increases likelihood of consumer completing a transaction (See Exhibit 2 Initiatives Grid). 2. Initiative 2: Utilize mobile marketing to attract and retain customers (See Exhibit 2 Initiatives). 3. Initiative 3: Gives merchants deeper insight into the purchasing behaviors of their customers and drives new customers through the door (See Exhibit 2 Initiatives). Discussion • All initiatives are recommended. Next Steps Toshifumi Suzuki’s to provide authorization by April 1, 2016 to implement Initiative 1: Mobile Payment, Initiative 2: Mobile Marketing and Initiative 3: Loyalty Program (See Exhibit 2 Initiatives Grid). SEBASTIAN CALABRO | ISTM654.4OL SP16 1 Exhibit 1 Bio Sebastian Calabro, CIO of Seven-Eleven Japan Co., Ltd. Calabro has over 30 years of IT experience including 6 years as CIO of Seven-Eleven Japan Co., Ltd. He has worked at Seven-Eleven Japan since its inception and has led multiple large project aimed at attracting new customers ranging from ¥1000MM - ¥$2550MM projects. Calabro holds a B.S. & M.S. in Computer Science from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and a MBA from Pepperdine’s Graziadio School of Business and Management. Exhibit 2 Option Grid Initiative 1: Mobile Payment Leverage Near Field Communication (NFC) capabilities found in most new mobile handsets to conduct payment transactions. RECOMMEND this initiative because it removes friction from the sales process and increases likelihood of consumers completing a transaction. Description of Initiative Overall Assessment Strategic Fit (Core Competencies) Funding Noteworthy Risks SUMMARY Exhibit 3 Initiative 2: Mobile Marketing Initiative 3: Loyalty Program Create a customer loyalty program that converges mobile payments (Initiative 1) and mobile marketing (Initiative 2). RECOMMEND this initiative because RECOMMEND this initiative because customers are smarter, more it gives merchants deeper insight empowered and better connected into the purchasing behaviors of than ever before. With competitotrs their customers and drives new only a few clicks away, few customers through the door. businesses are actually the only game in town. This initiative will support SevenThis initiative will support SevenEleven Japan's focus to adapting to Eleven Japan's focus to adapting to changing customer trends while changing customer trends while attracting more customers and attracting more customers and increase sale. increase sale. Utilize mobile marketing to attract and retain customers. This initiative will support SevenEleven Japan's focus to adapting to changing customer trends while attracting more customers and increase sale. Estimated funding needed for mobile app development = ¥10MM Estimated funding needed for mobile Estimated funding needed for mobile Estiamted funding needed for NFC app development= ¥10MM app development= ¥10MM Hardware = ¥10MM per store None. None. None. RECOMMENDED RECOMMENDED RECOMMENDED Implementation Schedule SEBASTIAN CALABRO | ISTM654.4OL SP16 2 CASE: E-524 DATE: 09/16/14 SURVEYMONKEY IN 2014 Upon his graduation from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a degree in computer science in 1998, Ryan Finley worked as an intern at a music start-up called Sonic Foundry. One of his projects required that he gather feedback from a large group of individuals as part of a market research study. After encountering a dearth of affordable, user-friendly tools on the market, Finley decided to build his own. Working out of his one-bedroom apartment, he developed a software tool that would allow him to construct his own survey with a user-friendly interface for survey respondents. The tool, which he called SurveyMonkey, not only made data gathering for his own project extremely efficient, it was well received by end users who found it intuitive and accessible. And as an unexpected benefit, the surveys proved to have a viral quality since survey respondents would return to SurveyMonkey when they needed to send out surveys of their own. The overwhelmingly positive feedback around the product led Finley to dedicate his full-time efforts to growing the SurveyMonkey business. Though the advertising-based revenue model was ubiquitous at the time, the founder opted for another route. In what was one of the earliest “freemium” models, Finley offered the survey tool with basic features for free, and charged users a fee of $20 per month if they wanted access to a more advanced feature set (e.g., increased question and response limits). The tool itself had been designed to be self-service and flexible, with little need for customer support to maximize the ease of use and minimize company overhead. Finley and his brother, who helped with operations, managed SurveyMonkey by themselves until 2005, at which point they relocated to Portland, Oregon, reasoning it was a “warmer Madison.” Over the next four years, the Finley brothers grew the company to 12 employees who, in addition to themselves, included seven customer services representatives and three Sara Rosenthal (MBA 2004), Robert Burgelman, Edmund W. Littlefield Professor of Management, and Robert Siegel, Lecturer in Organizational Behavior, prepared this case as the basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of an administrative situation. Copyright © 2014 by the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Publicly available cases are distributed through Harvard Business Publishing at hbsp.harvard.edu and The Case Centre at thecasecentre.org; please contact them to order copies and request permission to reproduce materials. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, used in a spreadsheet, or transmitted in any form or by any means –– electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise –– without the permission of the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Every effort has been made to respect copyright and to contact copyright holders as appropriate. If you are a copyright holder and have concerns, please contact the Case Writing Office at cwo@gsb.stanford.edu or write to Case Writing Office, Stanford Graduate School of Business, Knight Management Center, 655 Knight Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5015. This document is authorized for use by Orzhen Rushanyan, from 2/22/2019 to 4/12/2019, in the course: ISTM661.OL SP19 - Enterprise Architecture with Professor Demetrios Lazarikos (Laz), Pepperdine University. Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited*. SurveyMonkey in 2014 E524 p. 2 engineers. By 2008, SurveyMonkey had established a healthy business with substantial revenue and over 90 percent EBITDA margin.1 Finley knew the business could be much bigger, but recognized he needed a partner to help take it to the next level. Lacking access to capital or a recruiting network, he followed his accountant’s advice and began to explore the possibility of selling control of SurveyMonkey. Through the accountant’s network, the deal ended up with an independent investment banker in San Francisco who shopped it around to 15 different firms, most of whom turned it down either because they did not know what to make of the company’s unconventional financials or because SurveyMonkey was simply too big for their investment criteria. However, two firms that did take interest were Spectrum Equity, a growth equity firm with offices in Boston and Menlo Park, and Bain Capital Ventures, a venture investment firm, also with offices in Boston and Menlo Park. Brent Chudoba, a former associate at Spectrum who conducted due diligence on the deal, explained, “We were interested in growth opportunities, and this seemed to fit our niche between a venture story and a private equity buyout, but normally, a company like this would have 100 people working for it at that stage.”2 After meeting with the SurveyMonkey team, the Spectrum and Bain investment teams began a collaborative due diligence process to derive a sound valuation and a timeline for the deal. Chudoba worked hand-in-hand with Finley to gather data that would help him paint a picture of SurveyMonkey’s growth potential, a process he described as fun but unusual. The SurveyMonkey team did not have a solid grasp on how many subscribers they had, nor did they necessarily know how to define their subscribers, they simply knew how much cash was coming in the door. Ten days nose down and one 100-page PowerPoint deck later, Spectrum and Bain put in a bid to purchase SurveyMonkey in the fall of 2008. By this point, the Spectrum team had so fallen in love with the survey company that they were crushed to learn a few days later that the Finleys had accepted another competitive offer. Chudoba recalled the Spectrum partner with whom he worked at the time reaching out to Finley to let him know that if the other deal blew up for some reason, they would be in the wings, terms unchanged. As luck would have it, the other deal did fall apart, and the offer reopened, with the investment teams ultimately closing the deal to purchase SurveyMonkey on April 21, 2009. Hiring a CEO One of Spectrum’s portfolio companies in 2008 was Ancestry.com, the largest online provider of family history information and research tools. On Ancestry’s board at the time was David Goldberg, an entrepreneur who in 1994 founded one of the first online music companies, LAUNCH Media, with his best friend from high school. The two took the company public and in 2001, sold it to Yahoo! where Goldberg spent the next six years running Yahoo! Music, before leaving to work as an entrepreneur-in-residence at Benchmark Capital (see Exhibit 1 for Goldberg’s bio). Because the SurveyMonkey deal was unlike any other, Spectrum asked Goldberg to look at it with them given his depth of operational experience in a unique, consumer-focused business. 1 EBITDA is earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization. Interview with Brent Chudoba, April 3, 2014. All subsequent quotations are from this interview unless otherwise noted. 2 This document is authorized for use by Orzhen Rushanyan, from 2/22/2019 to 4/12/2019, in the course: ISTM661.OL SP19 - Enterprise Architecture with Professor Demetrios Lazarikos (Laz), Pepperdine University. Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited*. SurveyMonkey in 2014 E524 p. 3 Goldberg recalled his initial take on SurveyMonkey: It was the craziest thing I’d ever seen. They were doing really well, but when you would ask what they had done for marketing, for example, Ryan said, “Nothing really because the surveys kind of market themselves. One time, early on, I got dressed up in a gorilla suit and stood behind the Today show hosts when they were airing live and jumped around with a SurveyMonkey sign.”3 The more he learned about SurveyMonkey and its unconventional path, the more Goldberg found himself drawn to the business. As an entrepreneur who had built his own company from the ground up, he knew the tremendous amount of work that it took, and Finley had built a flexible, easy-to-use tool that solved a clear problem and generated healthy margins in the process. Throughout the due diligence period, the Spectrum team realized that Goldberg was not only a valuable asset to help them assess the deal, he was an ideal candidate for CEO. After evaluating four candidates in total, the new owners asked Goldberg to take the helm, “a perfect fit”, according to Chudoba, given Goldberg’s operational experience, strategic vision, teambuilding expertise, and extensive network. From Goldberg’s perspective, it was a perfect match as well. He described his feelings at the time: I wanted the opportunity to build a team and a culture, but starting from something that was real and that I didn’t have to build from scratch. And I’m motivated by building really long-lasting big things that change the world, like changing the way people listen to music. To be honest, I had never even thought about surveys. But as I started to dig in, I understood that people use SurveyMonkey to make decisions with data, and I thought that was really compelling. THE MASTER PLAN Goldberg had established a clear set of immediate priorities upon taking the reins at SurveyMonkey, all of which he communicated to Finley, who had agreed to stay on with his brother for two years following the acquisition. After completing the first task—relocating the company from Portland to Palo Alto—Goldberg set out to build the team, with Chudoba as his first hire, followed by a small management team to oversee SurveyMonkey’s key tactical and strategic functions. Second, Goldberg wanted to leverage the company’s small but growing global presence by focusing on localization and international growth. Third, it was clear that the product itself required a major technological overhaul, which would require significant beefing up of the engineering team beyond the two engineers who had already scaled the product to support several million users. Together, these changes represented phases one and two of 3 Interview with David Goldberg, March 5, 2014. All subsequent quotations are from this interview unless otherwise noted. This document is authorized for use by Orzhen Rushanyan, from 2/22/2019 to 4/12/2019, in the course: ISTM661.OL SP19 - Enterprise Architecture with Professor Demetrios Lazarikos (Laz), Pepperdine University. Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited*. SurveyMonkey in 2014 E524 p. 4 Goldberg’s growth plan, and would provide the foundation for SurveyMonkey to build upon a tremendous opportunity to capitalize on its increasing scale . Building a Team and Rebuilding the Product In April 2009, Goldberg brought on Minna King as SurveyMonkey’s vice president of international and one of his first hires. King came to the company with a long history of helping businesses grow their international audience, having previously guided LinkedIn through its international expansion, and having served as eBay’s international chief of staff. In 2009, 25 to 30 percent of SurveyMonkey’s user base was international, with customers in over 190 countries, despite the fact that the tool was available only in English, and the premium membership could only be purchased in U.S. dollars. The fact that customers were breaking through language and currency barriers to access the tool signaled tremendous opportunity to unlock massive demand if it could be localized to international audiences. In May 2009, Goldberg hired Noreen Bergin as vice president of finance and Tim Maly, as vice president, business operations and finance. Bergin had previously served as Netscape’s senior vice president of finance and controller, and Maly came from Google where he had previously served in senior sales and operations roles scaling up a variety of Google’s new business initiatives from inception. In addition to business development, operations and finance, Maly’s responsibilities would include business analytics, the process of compiling insights on customer behavior to identify opportunities to develop new products, promote premium products, and predict customer behavior and tenure. Finally, Goldberg recruited Selina Tobaccowala to the SurveyMonkey team in October 2009 as the vice president of product and engineering. Tobaccowala had previously founded Evite, one of the first online invitation platforms, before selling that business to IAC and joining Ticketmaster Europe as the senior vice president of product and technology. Not only was she an entrepreneur at heart, she was a skilled technologist with deep experience in online consumer products. In line with Goldberg’s hunch that the product needed an overhaul, Tobaccowala concluded that the entire architecture needed to be rewritten from its current .NET programming language to Python, both to create the most flexible platform going forward and to facilitate recruitment of top Silicon Valley engineers, most of whom strongly favored open source technologies. However, this massive undertaking would be comparable to “working on an airplane engine at 30,000 feet” since SurveyMonkey would need to keep the existing tool up and running while implementing a complete rewrite of the infrastructure in the background. (See Exhibit 1 for select team member bios.) Laying New Ground As SurveyMonkey entered 2010, Goldberg and his newly hired team sought to leverage the growth initiatives that could be executed within the confines of the technology overhaul. One such effort was the push to localize the SurveyMonkey website to support the language and currency of its most prevalent international users. Working with a translation management company, Smartling, the company chose Dutch as its first language for translation. King was fluent in the language (in addition to numerous others), which would ease internal quality control, and there was also significant organic demand from Dutch users, most of whom were This document is authorized for use by Orzhen Rushanyan, from 2/22/2019 to 4/12/2019, in the course: ISTM661.OL SP19 - Enterprise Architecture with Professor Demetrios Lazarikos (Laz), Pepperdine University. Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited*. SurveyMonkey in 2014 E524 p. 5 already comfortable with English. It was therefore a safe starting point to determine how a localized version of the site would be received, and the immediate feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Having verified users’ receptivity to the translated site, SurveyMonkey then upgraded the payment platform to allow users to purchase memberships in the local currency with pricing set to reflect the economic health of that particular country. The next round of localization efforts would follow a similar model, validating the translated site first before implementing the currency change, starting with those countries that had the greatest penetration outside the U.S., including the major English speaking countries and the majority of European Union countries (see Exh ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment

Tutor Answer

henryprofessor
School: UT Austin

Attached.

Running head: BUSINESS MEMO

1

Business Memo
Name
Institution

2

BUSINESS MEMO
Business Memo
To: Board of Directors
From: (Name)
Date: 30/03/2019
SUBJECT:SURVEY MONKEY
This MEMO recommends the following actions
(See Exhibit 1 survey monkey process):
1) Adoption of survey monkey software in helping to increase the research process.
2)Improve customer satisfaction through constant engagement.
3) Increase efficiency in ...

flag Report DMCA
Review

Anonymous
Thanks, good work

Similar Questions
Related Tags

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors