Explain the reasons behind passage of EEO legislation.

Business & Finance
Tutor: None Selected Time limit: 1 Day

Explain the reasons behind passage of EEO legislation.

Oct 11th, 2015

Thank you for the opportunity to help you with your question!

e U.S. Measure up to Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC") implements government laws precluding working environment separation. The EEOC was made by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The work segment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, known as Title VII, restricts separation in view of race, shading, national birthplace, sex, and religion, furthermore disallows bosses from retaliating against any representative who practices his or her rights under Title VII. Today, the EEOC upholds government against segregation statutes, and gives oversight and coordination of all elected equivalent open door regulations, arrangements, and practices. The Civil Rights development of the mid 1960s crested in the spring and summer of 1963. On June 19, 1963, President John F. Kennedy sent thorough social equality enactment to Congress, requesting that it "make a promise it has not completely made in this century to the suggestion that race has no spot in American life or law." However, there was solid political and social restriction to the enactment. Taking after President Kennedy's death in November, 1963, President Johnson kept on supporting the enactment, saying that "no commendation could more persuasively respect Kennedy's memory than the soonest conceivable entry of the social liberties bill for which he battled so long." Finally, and after much trade off, President Johnson marked into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on July 2, 1964. 

From 1965 through 1971, the EEOC did not have any genuine authorization power. Rather, Congress approved the Agency to research cases of segregation. In the event that the EEOC discovered sensible reason to trust that separation happened, the Agency alluded the case to the Department of Justice to prosecute. In any case, amid this period the office essentially affected the extent of future social liberties implementation. The EEOC reported the nature and degree of prejudicial practices in business, the first investigation of this kind done. Furthermore, the office helped singular offended parties through its amicus curiae program by recording "companion of the court" briefs translating the law. 

In 1972, Congressed passed the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972, which changed Title VII to give the EEOC power to lead its own particular requirement suit. The EEOC firmly impacted the legal translation of social liberties enactment. The organization's support characterized "segregation," a term rejected from the 1964 Act. In 1973, EEOC backers sought after case prompting the nation's frequently refered to against segregation U.S. Preeminent Court sentiment, McDonnell Douglas Corp. v. Green, 411 U.S. 792 (1973). All things considered, the Court held that an offended party could demonstrate an individual instance of deliberate separation, or dissimilar treatment, under Title VII, by indicating four elements. Id. at 802. There, the offended party demonstrated that he was in a roundabout way victimized in a showing so as to enlist case that (1) he was an individual from a Title VII ensured bunch; (2) he connected and was fit the bill for the position looked for; (3) the business dismisses the offended party for the occupation; and (4) the business kept on looking for candidates with comparative capabilities after the dismissal. Id. The Court confirmed that once an offended party succeeded in making this uncovered appearing of an at first sight case, the business must eloquent an authentic, nondiscriminatory explanation behind declining to employ the offended party. Id. Truant this demonstrating, the business is blameworthy of working environment separation. Id. Courts and the EEOC apply this explanatory structure to cases brought under all government against separation statutes. 

Today, the EEOC conducts authorization case under a few government statutes that deny work separation. The government statutes denying separation in occupation are: 

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), which denies business separation in light of race, shading, religion, sex, or national starting point; 

the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA), which ensures men and ladies who perform significantly equivalent work in the same foundation from sex-based compensation separation; 

the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA), which ensures people who are 40 years old or more established; 

Title I and Title V of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ( ADA), which deny business oppression qualified people with handicaps in the private segment, and in state and nearby governments; 

Areas 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which restrict oppression qualified people with inabilities who work in the central government; and 

the Civil Rights Act of 1991, which, in addition to other things, gives money related harms in instances of deliberate work segregation. 

The Agency researches charges of segregation and, now and again, brings common suits taking into account charges of separation. Charges of separation are frequently documented by private people ("complainants") who trust that their bosses have oppressed them. The EEOC examines those charges and issue discoveries taking into account its examinations. At times, if the EEOC finds that there is reasonable justification to trust separation has happened, it may decide to bring an authorization activity against the business. On the other hand, in most of the cases, the complainant will freely start and seek after any suit taking into account Title VII. Any person who wishes to record suit under Title VII or the ADA is required to fumes his or her authoritative cures before suing the business in court. As such, the complainant should first document an accuse of separation of the EEOC before it may look for legal cure.


Please let me know if you need any clarification. I'm always happy to answer your questions.
Oct 11th, 2015
Oct 11th, 2015

Did you know? You can earn $20 for every friend you invite to Studypool!
Click here to
Refer a Friend
...
Oct 11th, 2015
...
Oct 11th, 2015
May 25th, 2017
check_circle
Mark as Final Answer
check_circle
Unmark as Final Answer
check_circle
Final Answer

Secure Information

Content will be erased after question is completed.

check_circle
Final Answer