PSYFP7210 Capella University Adolescent Case Intervention Analysis

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PSY FP7210

Description

Create and analyze a 1–2-page simulated case study of an adolescent with developmental challenges. Then, create a 5–7-page intervention plan based on evidence-based strategies that have proven effective in similar cases and make projections of possible long-term impacts that current challenges may produce across the individual's lifespan.

The adolescent period begins with the onset of puberty. This is the time when people begin to try to figure out who they are and who they want to be. The quest for individuality is a prime focus at a time when significant—often uncomfortable—changes are taking place. In addition to dramatic biological changes, adolescents continue to demonstrate cognitive development and are greatly influenced by peer relationships while often being at odds with the influence of schools and parents. The issue of risk-taking behavior is prominent at this time.

Adolescent Case Intervention Analysis

What is adolescence? When does it begin and end? What risks and opportunities does it entail? This period of transformation from childhood to adulthood comprises so many changes in development—physical, cognitive, identity, and social—it has been referred to as adolescent metamorphosis.

Adolescence brings the emergence of sexual characteristics, sexual behavior, and sexual preference. Maturation affects males and females differently in terms of potential social and psychological problems.

In cognitive development, as the Piagetian stage of concrete operations is gradually supplanted by the formal operations stage, more evidence of reasoning and abstract thinking begin to emerge. The shift to this stage of formal thought has the capacity to influence adolescents' approach to academics as well as other life domains.

In addition to biological and cognitive changes, there are dramatic advancements in socialization and peer relationships. During adolescence, relationships with parents, siblings, and peers change. Adolescents no longer fit in well with groups of younger children and at the same time, they are not sufficiently developed to associate well with adults. Thus, adolescents can be greatly influenced by peer relationships, something that often places them at odds with the influence of parents and the broader community including schools. What risky or unhealthy behaviors are associated with adolescence? Are these behaviors common across genders or across cultures?

Adolescence is a time when humans begin the process of figuring out who they are and who they want to be. The quest for individuality is a major focus at a time when significant and often uncomfortable changes are taking place. Erikson (1950) proposes that all adolescents experience an identity crisis that needs to be resolved.

Effects of earlier influences continue to manifest themselves in the development of adolescents. And, the significant biological and social changes that adolescents undergo have great implications for their emergence into adulthood.

Reference

Erikson, E. H. (1950). Childhood and society (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Norton.


APA Resources

Because this is a psychology course, you must format this assessment according to APA guidelines, since it is the writing style of the profession. Use the following resources to guide your work. Additional resources about APA can be found in the Research Resources in the left navigation menu of your courseroom.

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Suggested Resources

The resources provided here are optional and support the assessment. They provide helpful information about the topics. You may use other resources of your choice to prepare for this assessment; however, you will need to ensure that they are appropriate, credible, and valid. The PSY-FP7210 – Lifespan Development Library Guide can help direct your research. The Supplemental Resources and Research Resources, both linked from the left navigation menu in your courseroom, provide additional resources to help support you.

Adolescent Development
Sample Research on Adolescent Social-Emotional Development

The following articles provide information on the social-emotional development of adolescents. Research the library for current articles that are more specific to your topic.

Sample Research on the Impact of Individual and Cultural Differences in Adolescent Development

The following articles provide information on the impact of individual and cultural differences on the development of adolescents. Research the library for current articles that are more specific to your topic.

Sample Evidence-Based Interventions for Adolescent Developmental Challenges

The following resources provide information about evidence-based interventions for adolescent development challenges. Research the library for current articles that are specific to your topic.

Part 1: Create the Case: Adolescence

Create a simulated case study, relevant to your area of specialization, of an adolescent who presents developmental challenges related to Erikson's age- or stage-related milestones expected at his or her age.

Your case study should be 1–2 pages in length and it should describe:

  • The adolescent and his or her strengths and challenges.
  • A challenge for the adolescent in terms of identity and self-concept.
  • The medical, family, and social context.
  • The developmental challenges evident in the behavior of the adolescent.
  • Evidence in the case that the adolescent struggles by not meeting the expected milestones of Erikson's theory of adolescent development.
  • Individual and cultural factors that theory and/or research indicate could impact the adolescent's development.
  • Any other factors you deem appropriate based on your understanding of the theory and related research.

To develop this case, you should:

  • Explore theory and research related to development linked to adolescence.
  • Utilize current research on adolescent brain development to describe potential outcomes linked to brain development at this age, including important considerations in the case you are developing.
  • Develop your case study further by creating an environmental context for the adolescent. Include any specific issues that you want to explore through research, such as influences of a specific culture or ethnicity or specific socioeconomic status.
  • Maintain a resource list of the materials you consulted to build your case.

Follow current APA guidelines for style and formatting, as well as for citing your resources. Include a reference list of the scholarly resources you use.

Part 2: Adolescent Case Intervention Analysis

Research

Complete the following:

  • Research evidence-based interventions that have been effective in meeting the challenges of the adolescent you described in your case study, from the perspective of your own professional specialization (as far as possible).
    • Explain how the deficits in the social-emotional developmental domain impact development.
    • Explain how the environmental contexts impact development.
    • State the recommended interventions that align with your specialization.
    • Include evidence for those recommendations and outcomes from the professional literature.
  • Explore briefly the literature on adult identity and self-concept, considering that early influences can impact development across the lifespan.
    • Explain, from the perspective of your specialization, how the identity issues (for example, Erikson's theoretical perspective) that emerged in adolescence could be manifested in adulthood.
    • Explain how this might help in understanding and determining an approach to working with an adult with a history of identity issues.

Structure of the Report

Use the following format to structure your report:

  • Title page.
    • A descriptive title of 5–15 words that concisely communicates the purpose of your report and includes the name of the fictional subject. Be sure to follow Capella's suggested format for title pages on course papers.
  • Introduction.
    • An overview of the paper contents, including a brief summary (approximately ½ page) of the background information regarding the case study. (The complete 1–2 page case you developed will be included as an appendix.)
  • Body of the report.
    • The presenting challenges and primary issues.
    • An analysis of how lifespan development theory and research may account for the presenting challenges.
    • An assessment of the potential impact of individual and cultural differences on development for the age and context described in the case study.
    • Suggestions of evidence-based intervention strategies that have proven effective in similar cases, supported by citations of research and any applicable theories.
    • Projections, based on research and/or theory, of possible long-term impacts that the current challenges may produce across the individual's lifespan.
  • Conclusion.
    • A summary of what was introduced in the body of the paper with respect to the case study context, challenges, and interventions.
  • Reference page.
    • A minimum of five scholarly sources from current peer-reviewed journals, formatted in current APA style.
  • Appendix.
    • The simulated case study you created in Part 1.

Other Requirements

Your paper should meet the following requirements:

  • Written communication: Write coherently to support central ideas, in appropriate APA format, and with correct grammar, usage, and mechanics.
  • Length of paper: 5–7 typed, double-spaced pages, not including the title page, reference page, or case study appendix.
  • References: At least five scholarly sources (peer-reviewed journals).
  • APA format: Follow current APA guidelines for style and formatting, as well as for citing your resources in the body of your paper and on the reference page.
  • Font and font size: Times New Roman, 12 points.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Running head: APA STYLE PAPER TEMPLATE 1 [Instructional text in this template is contained in square brackets ([…]). After reading the instructional text, please delete it, and use the document as a template for your own paper. To keep the correct format, edit the running head, cover page, headings, and reference list with your own information, and add your own body text. Save this template in a file for future use and information. The running head is an abbreviated title of the paper. The running head is located at the top of pages of a manuscript or published article to identify the article for readers. The running head should be a maximum of 50 characters, counting letters, punctuation, and spaces between words. The words "Running head" are on the cover page but not on the rest of the document. The running head title is all capital letters. Page 1 begins on the cover page. The entire document should be double-spaced, have 1-inch margins on all sides, and use 12-point Times New Roman font.] Full Title of Paper Learner's Full Name Course Title Assignment Title Capella University Month, Year APA STYLE PAPER TEMPLATE 2 Abstract [An abstract is a brief, comprehensive summary of the contents of a paper. This section is optional, so check assignment requirements. The abstract allows readers to quickly review the key elements of a paper without having to read the entire document. This can be helpful for readers who are searching for specific information and may be reviewing many documents. The abstract may be one of the most important paragraphs in a paper because readers often decide if they will read the document based on information in the abstract. An abstract may not be required in some academic papers; however, it can still be an effective method of gaining the reader's attention. For example, an abstract will not be required for Capella's first course, PSYC3002. The following sentences serve as an example of what could be composed as an abstract for this paper: The basic elements of APA style will be reviewed, including formatting of an APA style paper, in-text citations, and a reference list. Additional information will address the components of an introduction, how to write effective paragraphs using the MEAL plan, and elements of a summary and conclusion section of a paper.] APA STYLE PAPER TEMPLATE 3 Full Title of Paper [In APA style, the heading “Introduction” is not used; instead the introduction appears under the paper’s full title. An effective introduction often provides an obvious statement of purpose to help the reader know what to expect while helping the writer to focus and stay on task. For example, this paper will address several components necessary to effectively write an academic paper including (a) how to write an introduction, (b) how to write effective paragraphs using the MEAL plan, and (c) how to properly use APA style. An introduction may consist of four main components including (a) the position statement, thesis, or hypothesis, which describes the author's main position; (b) the purpose, which outlines the objective of the paper; (c) the background, which is general information that is needed to understand the content of the paper; and (d) the approach, which is the process or methodology the author uses to achieve the purpose of the paper. Authors may choose to briefly reference sources that will be identified later on in the paper as in this example (American Psychological Association, 2010a; American Psychological Association, 2010b; Walker, 2008).] Level One Section Heading is Centered, Bold, Uppercase and Lowercase [Using section headings can be an effective method of organizing an academic paper. The section headings should not be confused with the running head, which is a different concept described in the cover page of this document. Section headings are not required according to APA style; however, they can significantly improve the quality of a paper. This is accomplished because section headings help both the reader and the author.] APA STYLE PAPER TEMPLATE 4 Level Two Section Heading is Flush Left, Bold, Uppercase and Lowercase [The heading style recommended by APA consists of five levels (American Psychological Association, 2010a, p. 62). This document contains two levels to demonstrate how headings are structured according to APA style. Immediately before the previous paragraph, a Level 1 heading was used. That section heading describes how a Level 1 heading should be written, which is centered, bold, and using uppercase and lowercase letters. For another example, see the section heading "Writing an Effective Introduction" on page 3 of this document. The heading is centered, bold, and uses uppercase and lowercase letters (compared to all uppercase in the running head at the top of each page). If used properly, section headings can significantly contribute to the quality of a paper by helping the reader who wants to understand the information in the document, and the author who desires to effectively describe the information in the document.] Section Headings Help the Reader [Section headings serve multiple purposes including (a) helping readers understand what is being addressed in each section, (b) breaking up text to help readers maintain an interest in the paper, and (c) helping readers choose what they want to read. For example, if the reader of this document wants to learn more about writing an effective introduction, the previous section heading clearly states that is where information can be found. When subtopics are needed to explain concepts in greater detail, different levels of headings are used according to APA style.] Section Headings Help the Author [Section headings do not only help the reader, they help the author organize the document during the writing process. Section headings can be used to arrange topics in a logical order, and they can help an author manage the length of the paper. In addition to an effective introduction APA STYLE PAPER TEMPLATE 5 and the use of section headings, each paragraph of an academic paper can be written in a manner that helps the reader stay engaged. Capella University promotes the use of the MEAL plan to serve this purpose.] The MEAL Plan [The MEAL plan is a model used by Capella University to help learners effectively compose academic discussions and papers. Each component of the MEAL plan is critical to writing an effective paragraph. The acronym MEAL is based on four components of a paragraph (M = Main point, E = Evidence or Example, A = Analysis, and L = Link). The following section includes a detailed description and examples of each component of the MEAL plan. When writing the content sections of an academic paper (as opposed to the introduction or conclusion sections), the MEAL plan can be an effective model for designing each paragraph. A paragraph begins with a description of the main point, which is represented by the letter "M" of the MEAL plan. For example, the first sentence of this paragraph clearly states the main point is a discussion of the MEAL plan. Once the main point has been made, evidence and examples can be provided. The second component of a paragraph contains evidence or examples, which is represented by the letter "E" in the MEAL plan. An example of this component of the MEAL plan is actually (and ironically) this sentence, which provides an example of an example. Evidence can be in the form of expert opinions from research. For example, evidence shows that plagiarism can occur even when it is not intended if sources are not properly cited (Marsh, Landau, & Hicks, 1997; Walker, 2008). The previous sentence provides evidence supporting why evidence is used in a paragraph. APA STYLE PAPER TEMPLATE 6 Analysis, which is represented by the letter "A" of the MEAL plan, should be based on the author's interpretation of the evidence. An effective analysis might include a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the arguments, as well as the author's interpretations of the evidence and examples. If a quote is used, the author will likely provide an analysis of the quote and the specific point it makes for the author's position. Without an analysis, the reader might not understand why the author discussed the information that the reader just read. For example, the previous sentence was an analysis by the author of why an analysis is performed when writing paragraphs in academic papers. Even with the first three elements of the MEAL plan, it would not be complete without the final component. The letter "L" of the MEAL plan refers to information that "links" the current and the subsequent paragraphs. The link helps the reader understand what will be discussed in the next paragraph. It summarizes the author's reasoning and shows how the paragraph fits together and leads (that is, links) into the next section of the paper. For example, this sentence might explain that once the MEAL plan has been effectively used when writing the body of an academic paper, the final section is the summary and conclusion section.] Conclusion [A summary and conclusion section, which can also be the discussion section of an APA style paper, is the final opportunity for the author to make a lasting impression on the reader. The author can begin by restating opinions or positions and summarizing the most important points that have been presented in the paper. For example, this paper was written to demonstrate to readers how to effectively use APA style when writing academic papers. Various components of an APA style paper that were discussed or displayed in the form of examples include a running APA STYLE PAPER TEMPLATE head, title page, introduction section, levels of section headings and their use, in-text citations, the MEAL plan, a conclusion, and the reference list.] 7 APA STYLE PAPER TEMPLATE 8 References American Psychological Association. (2010a). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. American Psychological Association. (2010b). Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/index.aspx Marsh, R. L., Landau, J. D., & Hicks, J. L. (1997). Contributions of inadequate source monitoring to unconscious plagiarism during idea generation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 23(4), 886–897. doi: 10.1037/02787393.23.4.886 Walker, A. L. (2008). Preventing unintentional plagiarism: A method for strengthening paraphrasing skills. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 35(4), 387–395. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/213904438?accountid=27965 [Always begin a reference list on a new page. Use a hanging indent after the first line of each reference. The reference list is in alphabetical order by first author’s last name. A reference list only contains sources that are cited in the body of the paper, and all sources cited in the body of the paper must be contained in the reference list. The reference list above contains an example of how to cite a source when two documents are written in the same year by the same author. The year is also displayed using this method for the corresponding in-text citations as in the next sentence. The author of the first citation (American Psychological Association, 2010a) is also the publisher, therefore, the word "Author" is used in place of the publisher's name. When a digital object identifier (DOI) is available for a journal article, it should be placed at the end of the citation. If a DOI is not available, a uniform resource locator (URL) should be used. The Marsh, Landau, and Hicks (1997) reference is an example of how to cite a source using a DOI. The Walker (2008) reference is an example of how to cite a source using a URL.]
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Running head: VICTORIA’S ADOLESCENT CASE INTERVENTION ANALYSIS

Victoria’s Adolescent Case Intervention Analysis
Learner’s Full Name
Course Title
Assignment Title
Month, Year

1

VICTORIA’S ADOLESCENT CASE INTERVENTION ANALYSIS

2

Victoria’s Adolescent Case Intervention Analysis
Adolescence is a transformation period from childhood to adulthood with changes in
development that include social, physical, self-identity and cognitive development. These changes
are broadly classified as adolescent metamorphosis. Puberty begins at adolescence and children
usually struggle to understand their personalities and the goals to set in life. As such, bodies of
children change during this period as they discover sexuality. This study delves into a case analysis
of an adolescent girl, Victoria, who seems to struggle with self-identity stage of psychosocial
development.
Background
Adolescence brings more thoughtfulness to fitting in and social groups among children.
Victoria is a 15-year-old girl whose consciousness of body image has turned into a severe
psychological eating disorder. The girl’s behavior is a perfect replica of people suffering from
bulimia nervosa. Victoria has regular episodes of uncontrolled binge eating especially during lunch
and dinner meals. After a binge, she experiences guilt, regret, and shame. The girl’s compensatory
behavior to this eating habit is vomiting to prevent weight gain. Victoria keeps this embarrassing
behavior hidden from her family and friends. She makes bathroom trips immediately after meals and
vomits with water running to conceal the sound of vomiting. Victoria usually chews ball gums in the
presence of her colleagues after lunch to hide the odor of vomit on her breath.
Changes in Girls during Puberty
During puberty, girls’ breasts start to develop between the ages of 12 to 18 years (Arnett,
2014). Pubic, leg and armpit hair usually grow at the age of 14 years. The monthly menstrual
periods starts about two years after the development of breasts and pubic hair. Growth spurts
commence at the onset of puberty and slow down at the age of 16 years. Adolescents are influenced
more by social groups and their peers than authority figures and their family members. Some

VICTORIA’S ADOLESCENT CASE INTERVENTION ANALYSIS

3

children become daring and rebellious at puberty. Cognitive development of adolescents begins to
deepen their abstract thinking and reasoning. As such, these changes are dramatic and confuse
children.
Primary Issues and Presenting Challenges
Adolescents are usually conscious of their looks and people they associate with daily.
Victoria’s psychological eating disorder due to body image consciousness is a great concern to her
parents. She consumes high-calorie foods rapidly until she gets uncomfortably full. Preceding this
binging incident, Victoria usually experiences intense hunger and lacks control during the binge.
Nevertheless, this teen fears weight gain and believes that purging would help to regulate her
weig...


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