Lab 3 Astronomy Measuring The Size Of The Earth Physics Report

Anonymous
timer Asked: Apr 15th, 2019
account_balance_wallet $19.99

Question Description

Lab assignment regarding basic concepts of astronomy.

The lab sheet is short.

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Astronomy Lab 3 Measuring the Size of the Earth To be completed after reading Arny Chapter 1 Name: _________________ Introduction: By approximately 200 B.C. a Greek scholar named Erastothenes had already come up with an astonishingly accurate calculation of the size of the earth. He knew that at noon on a certain day, shadows in a town a fixed distance south were directly below the objects casting them. He measured the angle of the shadows in his city on that same day, and with that angle, and the distance between the two cities, he was able to compute the size of the earth. In this lab you will calculate the size of the earth using a very similar technique, but using the star Polaris rather than the Sun. Theory: Two cities on the globe, one of which lies directly north of the other, can be idealized and portrayed as simply two points on the edge of a circle with the distance between them being the arc length, s. With this simplification, it is possible to apply the geometrical relationship between the interior angle and the arc length of a circle to calculate the radius of this idealized earth. Once the interior angle, α, is determined, the following proportion can be used to discover the radius, R: s Δθ C  s = o 2R 360 R (1) Fig. 1 To find the radius of the earth, R, using Eq. (1), we have to find some way to measure the angle α. This is really not all that difficult, as this angle is simply the difference in the latitudes of the two cities. So all we really have to do to find the radius of the earth is to find a way to determine the latitude of a given point on the earth. To NCP Fig 2 O = location of observer. h = horizon of observer. C = center of the earth. ℓ = latitude of observer. θ = altitude of NCP θ h θ 90°-ℓ or 90°-θ C equator O ℓ One of the most important ideas in Celestial Navigation is that the altitude of the North Celestial Pole (Polaris) is equal to the latitude of the observer. Fig 2 illustrates the geometry of this concept. It is not particularly difficult to prove ℓ, the latitude of the observer, is equal to angle θ, the altitude of the North Celestial Pole (NCP). Thus, it is only necessary to measure the angle between the horizon and the star Polaris to find the latitude of a particular point on Earth. The proof that θ equals ℓ involves simply realizing that the two lines headed off to the NCP are parallel lines. Then it is obvious that angle θ is equal to angle ℓ, because 90°- ℓ equals 90°- θ. Altitude θ= l The figure above shows how Polaris (the North Celestial Pole) would appear from a latitude, l. In this lab, you will use Starry Night to measure the altitude of Polaris from two different cities a known distance, s, apart. This will give the size of the earth. Procedure: Open the program Starry Night, go to the tab Labels, and click on Show All. Then go to the tab View/Celestial Guides and click on Celestial Poles. Then set your location by using the tab Options, and clicking on Viewing Location. Scroll to find Birmingham, AL and double-click to select and go to that location. Change the time until it is night and then drag your field of view until you are looking directly north. Choose your cursor tool to be Angular Separation using the button at the far left. Measure the angular separation between the North point on the horizon straight up to the North Celestial Pole, and record this value. Starry Night will display the angular separation in degrees of arc, then minutes of arc, then seconds of arc. Record only the degrees and minutes. Note that the star Polaris is within a degree of the North Celestial Pole. Altitude of Polaris at Birmingham = Latitude of Birmingham: θB = lB =______ deg ____ _____ min Convert latitude to decimal degrees, lB = _______.______ degrees (divide minutes by 60, then add the decimal to the degrees) Use the Go tab again to set your viewing location to South Bend, IN (nearly due north of Birmingham) by typing in its zip code 46601, and again measure the angular separation between Polaris and the horizon. Altitude of Polaris at South Bend = Latitude of South Bend: θSB = lSB =______ deg ____ _____ min Convert latitude to decimal degrees, lSB = _______.______ degrees (divide minutes by 60, then add the decimal to the degrees) Calculate Δθ, which is the difference in the two latitude values Δθ= lSB – lB = _____.____ 360 o s Solving Eq. (1) for R we get: R = 2 The odometer of a car could be used to determine the distance, s, between South Bend and Birmingham to be approximately s ≈ 1000 kilometers. 360 o s Calculate R = =______________ km 2 Compare your value with the generally accepted value of REarth = 6,378 kilometers. Calculate your percent error: % error = R − 6,378  100% = _______________ % 6,378 What uncertainties in this experiment could lead to this amount of error? ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment

Tutor Answer

andythewxman
School: Purdue University

Ok, here you go for the first one. Check it out and let me know if you have any questions.

Astronomy Lab 3
Measuring the Size of the Earth
To be completed after reading Arny Chapter 1
Name: _________________
Introduction: By approximately 200 B.C. a Greek scholar named Erastothenes had
already come up with an astonishingly accurate calculation of the size of the earth. He
knew that at noon on a certain day, shadows in a town a fixed distance south were
directly below the objects casting them. He measured the angle of the shadows in his city
on that same day, and with that angle, and the distance between the two cities, he was
able to compute the size of the earth. In this lab you will calculate the size of the earth
using a very similar technique, but using the star Polaris rather than the Sun.
Theory: Two cities on the globe, one of which lies directly north of the other, can be
idealized and portrayed as simply two points on the edge of a circle with the distance
between them being the arc length, s. With this si...

flag Report DMCA
Review

Anonymous
awesome work thanks

Similar Questions
Related Tags

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors