Module 04 Written Assignment - Persuasive Paper, First Draft

Anonymous

Question Description

Because good writing is always a process, our persuasive essay will be written in two parts: a first draft due this week and a final draft due in week 6. Your paper should be 3-4 pages in length.

As you prepare, here are a few reminders for this week's draft:

  1. In week 3 you posted a thesis for peer review. Use the revised thesis, based on your classmates' and teacher's feedback as the basis for your persuasive paper.
  1. Use your sources to support your thesis. Research and prepare the passages you will consider using. Remember to review methods of paraphrasing, summarizing, and using direct quotations.
  1. Prepare the body paragraphs by deciding where to place supporting information. Remember, each paragraph of the paper should act to build the momentum of the argument.
  1. Apply pathos, logos, and ethos whenever possible.
  1. Finally, remember that it's okay if your ideas, opinions, or sources change during process of writing this paper. Writing makes us think, and it's fine - even beneficial - to have our thoughts change as we express them on paper.

( Thesis Statement )

Video games influence users negatively through creation of stereotypes that include social and sexual stereotypes which subsequently incites social conflicts and violence in the society.

OTHER INFO ATTACH TO GUIDE YOU

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Running head: VIDEOGAMES AND STEREOTYPES Do Video Games Reinforce Stereotypes Desmond K. Fulton Rasmussen College Author Note This paper is being submitted on April 21, 2019 for Debra Bohlman, English Composition 1 VIDEOGAMES AND STEREOTYPES 2 Do Video Games Reinforce Stereotypes Thesis Statement Video games influence users negatively through creation of stereotypes that include social and sexual stereotypes which subsequently incites social conflicts and violence in the society. Annotated Bibliography Glaubke, C. R., Miller, P., Parker, M. A., & Espejo, E. (2001). Fair Play? Violence, Gender and Race in Video Games. The article explores the messages that videogames attempt to portray to the public. The article takes a critical approach to an analysis of the content in most video games. In the cross sectional experimental study, the research investigates the social and cultural messages that dominate in the video games that are currently the most marketed. The aim of the research is to ascertain whether there are any negative cultural messages that could be present and finds that out of the 70 games meant for use by children there were negative social messages (Glaubke et al., 2001). The importance of the source is that it identifies racial stereotypes alongside violence, despising of women and other negative messages to characterize video games. In this research, the source is important as part of the scholarly perspectives as to whether or not video games promote negative stereotypes. Yang, G. S., Gibson, B., Lueke, A. K., Huesmann, L. R., & Bushman, B. J. (2014). Effects of avatar race in violent video games on racial attitudes and aggression. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 5(6), 698-704. VIDEOGAMES AND STEREOTYPES 3 Yang et al., 92014) on the other hand focus their argument on the roles that video games play in promoting racial stereotypes. More specifically the research explores whether video games communicate racial attitudes about aggressive. The question by the authors is quite important because aggression and violence is one of the most prominent public concerns regarding the safety of video games for children’s social and psychological health. The article findings are that videos that had black avatars and depicted violence created negative attitudes towards blacks. The levels in which such games created the negative attitudes towards blacks was much higher than in games that were nonviolent or used white avatar when violent. The rationale here is that the source is instrumental in revealing that video games have a profound effect on the social ideologies of the children or adults who play them. Leonard, D. (2004). High tech blackface: Race, sports, video games and becoming the other. In Intelligent Agent (Vol. 4, No. 4.2, p. 1). The role of video games in facilitating racial attitudes with regard to violence is a topic that this source also explores. In fact, Leonard, (2004) acknowledge that video games form the scenery for creating negative social notions concerning African Americans terming them as ‘high-tech black faces’. The argument that the authors attempt to place is that video games offer the players an opportunity to act like a black man when they use blacks as avatars. Additionally, the article discusses NFL games such as NFL Street and NBA where they manifest racial stereotypes having athletic black avatars in settings where there is use of obscene language. The showcasing of such ideas may lead the players to gain certain perceptions about blacks that are negative, or that may make an individual preempt a negative expectation of a black individual in real life. The article is VIDEOGAMES AND STEREOTYPES 4 important because it explores the racial aspect of games that forms a widely debated topic involving how gaming promotes social stereotypes. Stermer, S. P., & Burkley, M. (2015). SeX-Box: Exposure to sexist video games predicts benevolent sexism. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 4(1), 47. The authors reveal that videogames also have the potential for facilitating development of other stereotypes such as sexism. In the study, the researchers survey respondents who reported to have played video games and compared them to those who did not. Accordingly, the research was on sexist messages in video games and their effects on the individual behavior. From the research, men who played videogames with sexist attitudes showed more ambivalent sexism than men who did not play such games (Stermer & Burkley, 2015). The source is quite unique in the sense that exposure to videogames has been linked mostly to violence alone. However, the source unveils that videogames may also facilitate the development of other behaviors such as gender based stereotypes or attitudes. Paaßen, B., Morgenroth, T., & Stratemeyer, M. (2017). What is a true gamer? The male gamer stereotype and the marginalization of women in video game culture. Sex Roles, 76(7-8), 421-435. The article takes a rather different approach in exploring how videogames influence our social interaction and the attitudes we hold about each other. In this case, the researchers consider that the use of videogames in itself is stereotypes. Paaßen, B., Morgenroth, T.,& Stratemeyer, (2017) state that men and women are exposed to videogames relatively equally but that videogames are stereotypically associated with men only. The research VIDEOGAMES AND STEREOTYPES 5 observes that women are actively marginalized or ignored in their roles as gamers and due to the domination of the gaming culture by males, women may fail to benefit out of the activity. The source is important in revealing the extent in which gaming and its contents are linked to social stereotypes. Thus one may question whether the reduced role of women in the video gaming world affects their suitability for women. VIDEOGAMES AND STEREOTYPES 6 References Glaubke, C. R., Miller, P., Parker, M. A., & Espejo, E. (2001). Fair Play? Violence, Gender and Race in Video Games. Leonard, D. (2004). High tech blackface: Race, sports, video games and becoming the other. In Intelligent Agent (Vol. 4, No. 4.2, p. 1). Paaßen, B., Morgenroth, T., & Stratemeyer, M. (2017). What is a true gamer? The male gamer stereotype and the marginalization of women in video game culture. Sex Roles, 76(7-8), 421-435. Stermer, S. P., & Burkley, M. (2015). SeX-Box: Exposure to sexist video games predicts benevolent sexism. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 4(1), 47. Yang, G. S., Gibson, B., Lueke, A. K., Huesmann, L. R., & Bushman, B. J. (2014). Effects of avatar race in violent video games on racial attitudes and aggression. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 5(6), 698-704. ...
Purchase answer to see full attachment

Tutor Answer

TutorClairere
School: Rice University

Here you go. In case you require edits, do not hesitate to hit me up. If satisfied with the response, kindly mark the question as complete. Looking forward to work with you in the near future.

RUNNING HEAD: VIDEO GAMES INFLUENCE

Video Games Influence

Student’s Name

Institution

Date

RUNNING HEAD: VIDEO GAMES INFLUENCE
There tend to be some stunning beaches that have hidden dangers around the world.
When water floods the sand particles, the result happens to be a muddy mixture, and it cannot
support a person's weight since when someone walks on it, they sink below. As the person drops,
the water is pushed out creating a vacuum effect which secures the victim even tighter, and
sometimes it ends up in a desperate situation. This is a simple illustration of what video games
do to millions of individuals, both teenagers and children, sometimes even adults every single
day. Video games influence users negatively through the creation of stereotypes that include
social and sexual stereotypes which subsequently incites social conflicts and violence in the
society.
In our current society, teens and video games go hand in hand. This is however not an
issue with the teens only since children also play video games. Whether played on the television
set, a portable unit or the internet, video games can have adverse effects on the users when
excessive gaming is incorporated. A more significant perce...

flag Report DMCA
Review

Anonymous
awesome work thanks

Similar Questions
Related Tags

Brown University





1271 Tutors

California Institute of Technology




2131 Tutors

Carnegie Mellon University




982 Tutors

Columbia University





1256 Tutors

Dartmouth University





2113 Tutors

Emory University





2279 Tutors

Harvard University





599 Tutors

Massachusetts Institute of Technology



2319 Tutors

New York University





1645 Tutors

Notre Dam University





1911 Tutors

Oklahoma University





2122 Tutors

Pennsylvania State University





932 Tutors

Princeton University





1211 Tutors

Stanford University





983 Tutors

University of California





1282 Tutors

Oxford University





123 Tutors

Yale University





2325 Tutors