Formal Essay #4: Kevin Powers’ The Yellow Birds

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I need qualified writer. I need this paper to be clear, argumentative and plagirism-free.

I attached the rough draft I wrote ( 1 introduction and 1 body paragraph). You may continue with my draft or start your own.

I need strong and argumentative thesis, and you have to follow structure of the body paragraph as (touch stone text( the yellow birds), analysis, lens text(research), analysis and explaination.

you may use my draft and research resourses to continue (option 4) or you could start your own. But it has to be plagirism free and no grammar mistake and qualified essay. I need three body paragraph.

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Sam Hutchings, Instructor English Composition 102 Spring 2019 Formal Essay #4: Kevin Powers’ The Yellow Birds Using at least 3 to 4 credible sources* that you have researched yourself, create your own argument that relates psychological issues of real-life soldiers and/or war veterans to those found in the characters in Kevin Powers’ The Yellow Birds. See specific topic ideas below. *You may use either Margarita Tartakovsky’s “Soldiers: The War Within” or Maggie Puniewska’s “Healing a Wounded Sense of Morality” along with the 3 to 4 other sources you find. I recommend you choose one of these topics, or some variation thereof: ● Compare the psychological issues endured by soldiers/veterans of the War in Iraq and/or Afghanistan (using the novel) with those issues experienced by soldiers of the Vietnam War to make an argument about the extent of their differences. ● Research what the real mental conditions of Iraq/Afghanistan veterans are today in order to hypothesize how the character(s) in the novel might be holding up now. ○ Related subtopic: Research what kind of services are currently available to war veterans that could help the characters in the novel transition into civilian life and/or cope with their psychological struggles. ● Conduct more research on the conditions of the War in Iraq/Afghanistan—the terrain and climate of the area, the conditions of battles, the nature of the enemy, etc.—that could shed more light on why certain characters in the novel behave the way they do. ● Continuing on Sebastian Junger’s theories, do more research on why veterans miss war and analyze whether that explains John Bartle’s experiences in postwar life. Due Dates: On April 18th (Thursday), your 1-2 page, typed topic proposal is due, and we will be meeting in the Dana Library (April 9th) for an important lesson from a librarian about research strategies. (By the end of this period, most will have found all of their 3-4 sources.) The topic proposal will be a description of what you plan on writing about for the paper, why you chose the topic, at least four quotes from the novel that you might use (and why they are relevant), and what important questions you need to answer during the research in order to develop the argument. On April 23rd (Tuesday) a detailed outline and Works Cited is due. • Rough Draft: April 30th (Tuesday) • Final Draft: May 2nd (Thursday) Potentially Helpful Hints: Your essay should include a thesis statement1 that directly, accurately, and specifically responds to the question asked. Your paper should be carefully organized: main ideas should be put forth in a logical order and paragraphs should be guided by topic sentences that support the central thesis. You will need to explain your points thoroughly, support your arguments with specific evidence from the text, and analyze the quotes and examples that you use. Your paper should be carefully proofread for word choice, sentence sense and variety, and grammatical errors. • Other Tips: o Eliminate personal pronouns (me, I, you, us, our, etc.). o Write a compelling title, often generated by some idea from your thesis. o Formulate a thesis that uses specific, concrete language (not vague phrases). o Eliminate clichés (hand-in-hand, a bitter pill to swallow). ▪ Also, NO stale phrases: (All-in-all, in conclusion, in summation). o In your conclusion, synthesize your supporting points, and then add what the ideas you’ve just discussed may mean to society at large. Format Guidelines: (SIDE NOTE: Please provide me with an original title for your essay. Please.) Paper length: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font, stapled. A fivepage minimum means five FULL pages. Anything less will not be accepted. Margins: 1-inch on each side, no extra space between paragraphs or at the top or bottom of the page. Format: Follow MLA format for all in-text citations and format your paper according to the MLA guidelines in your style manual. 1 Please check your thesis using the Thesis Checklist handout. English Composition 102 1st May 2019 Formal Essay#4 Rough Draft The psychological damage caused by war is far more significant than the physical injury, as a mental wound is harder to heal and cure. In the novel “The Yellow Birds” by Kevin Powers, the story is based on a twenty-one years old soldier, John Bartle, and his experience in the war. Power takes the reader into Bartle’s mind, demonstrates the psychological injury caused by war and long-lasting trauma that remains with a soldier postwar. Sebastian Junger gives an idea of tribalization in his Ted Talk and book “Tribe”, it explains why veterans miss war and a non-tribalized society exacerbating PTSD symptoms. Sarah Boseley’s article “PTSD more likely to affect people in affluent countries, scientists say” explains the reasons for post-traumatic stress disorder may be less common in countries where the more traumatic event occurred. Brue P. Dohrenwend’s article “Why Some Soldiers develop PTSD While Others Don’t” shows combat exposure is not the only cause of PTSD, other factors like pre-war vulnerabilities and involvement in harming civilians also contribute to symptoms of PTSD. Most Veterans experienced PTSD is not only because of what happened in the battlefield during wartime but more importantly about what happened back in their home country pre-war time and postwar time, as young soldiers are too immature to accept the cruelty of the war and experiencing alienation after return to the home country. After soldiers return to their home country, they find it’s hard to adapt to the society they were born. In Power’s novel, Bartle feels severely alienated from a society that doesn’t understand the true nature of war, which makes it more difficult for him to reintegrate back into civilian life. The feeling of alienation aggravates Bartle’s psychological issue as he has a hard time to find anyone he could trust or share the same perspective about the war. In Powers’ novel, Bartle speaks with an airport bartender, who speaks ignorantly and disparagingly about the Iraqi people, claiming they are all savages, to which Bartle responds by saying, “Yeah, man. Something like that” (Powers 106). Bartle is lack of response and intends to end the conversation; shows he doesn’t fully agree with bartender’s statement. He does not want to explain more to the bartender as he knows civilians are hard to understand real war situation since they are far away from the battlefield. In his book, Junger claims that soldiers often have a difficult time reintegrating back into society because many citizens don’t understand the reality of combat, stating, “The closer the public is to the actual combat, the better the war will be understood and the less difficulty soldiers will have when they come home” (Junger 96). As the bartender is far away from the actual combat, his assumption is never accurate. Civilians are receiving information about the war from media, and the media does not show much cruelty about the war but more propaganda. Bartender’s information about “enemy” comes from the media, which is subjective. That is the reason for making that ignorant statement. Bartle does not feel the same way since he experienced the war. Bartender’s statement reminds Bartle of the difference between how civilians perceive the war and veterans perceive the war. Bartle finds it’s tough to be back with a different perspective about the war. In Powers’ novel, after the bartender offers to pay for Bartle’s drinks as thanks for his military service, Bartle refuses, stating, “‘Forget it. I want to pay.’ I didn’t want to smile and say thanks; Didn’t want to pretend I’d done anything except for survive” (Power 107). Bartender offering Bartle a free drink as a special honor, he refuses that offer because he feels like a fraud as a noble. Accepting the drink symbolize accepting the status as a hero, that special feeling alienates Bartle from civilians, and it reminds the horrible memory from the war. Veterans do not want to feel special or different, any special treatments become the distance of soldiers and civilians. In his book, Junger claims that public meaning, which gives soldiers a context for their losses and sacrifices that is acknowledged by most of the society, isn’t generated by formulaic phrases or token acts, stating, “Token acts only deepen the chasm between the military and civilian population by highlighting the fact that some people serve their country but the vast majority don’t” (Junger 97). Bartender’s free offer is a token act that honors Bartle as a hero. Although token acts are meant to glorify soldiers, they separate civilian and soldiers and recall soldiers’ painful memory about the war. Token acts are a superficial sense of charity and do not truly help soldiers while learning their true war experiences and eliminating the distance help soldiers to adapt to society faster. Power chooses to depict such difficulties in his novel as Bartle has a difficult time reintegrating into postwar life, demonstrating the society should be more cohesive and united for veterans recover their mental injury caused by war. As Junger mentions in his Ted Talk that the fundamental problems that occurred on veterans aren’t about them, but the rest of the society. Civilians should give soldiers opportunities to share their losses and sacrifice in the war, moreover acknowledge them as a unified society. This relieves soldiers’ guilty and rage that developed among soldiers in a war that doesn’t seem to end. Sam Hutchings, Instructor English Composition 102 Spring 2019 Formal Essay #4: Kevin Powers’ The Yellow Birds Using at least 3 to 4 credible sources* that you have researched yourself, create your own argument that relates psychological issues of real-life soldiers and/or war veterans to those found in the characters in Kevin Powers’ The Yellow Birds. See specific topic ideas below. *You may use either Margarita Tartakovsky’s “Soldiers: The War Within” or Maggie Puniewska’s “Healing a Wounded Sense of Morality” along with the 3 to 4 other sources you find. I recommend you choose one of these topics, or some variation thereof: ● Compare the psychological issues endured by soldiers/veterans of the War in Iraq and/or Afghanistan (using the novel) with those issues experienced by soldiers of the Vietnam War to make an argument about the extent of their differences. ● Research what the real mental conditions of Iraq/Afghanistan veterans are today in order to hypothesize how the character(s) in the novel might be holding up now. ○ Related subtopic: Research what kind of services are currently available to war veterans that could help the characters in the novel transition into civilian life and/or cope with their psychological struggles. ● Conduct more research on the conditions of the War in Iraq/Afghanistan—the terrain and climate of the area, the conditions of battles, the nature of the enemy, etc.—that could shed more light on why certain characters in the novel behave the way they do. ● Continuing on Sebastian Junger’s theories, do more research on why veterans miss war and analyze whether that explains John Bartle’s experiences in postwar life. Due Dates: On April 18th (Thursday), your 1-2 page, typed topic proposal is due, and we will be meeting in the Dana Library (April 9th) for an important lesson from a librarian about research strategies. (By the end of this period, most will have found all of their 3-4 sources.) The topic proposal will be a description of what you plan on writing about for the paper, why you chose the topic, at least four quotes from the novel that you might use (and why they are relevant), and what important questions you need to answer during the research in order to develop the argument. On April 23rd (Tuesday) a detailed outline and Works Cited is due. • Rough Draft: April 30th (Tuesday) • Final Draft: May 2nd (Thursday) Potentially Helpful Hints: Your essay should include a thesis statement1 that directly, accurately, and specifically responds to the question asked. Your paper should be carefully organized: main ideas should be put forth in a logical order and paragraphs should be guided by topic sentences that support the central thesis. You will need to explain your points thoroughly, support your arguments with specific evidence from the text, and analyze the quotes and examples that you use. Your paper should be carefully proofread for word choice, sentence sense and variety, and grammatical errors. • Other Tips: o Eliminate personal pronouns (me, I, you, us, our, etc.). o Write a compelling title, often generated by some idea from your thesis. o Formulate a thesis that uses specific, concrete language (not vague phrases). o Eliminate clichés (hand-in-hand, a bitter pill to swallow). ▪ Also, NO stale phrases: (All-in-all, in conclusion, in summation). o In your conclusion, synthesize your supporting points, and then add what the ideas you’ve just discussed may mean to society at large. Format Guidelines: (SIDE NOTE: Please provide me with an original title for your essay. Please.) Paper length: 5-7 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font, stapled. A fivepage minimum means five FULL pages. Anything less will not be accepted. Margins: 1-inch on each side, no extra space between paragraphs or at the top or bottom of the page. Format: Follow MLA format for all in-text citations and format your paper according to the MLA guidelines in your style manual. 1 Please check your thesis using the Thesis Checklist handout. Formal Essay#4 Rough Draft(option 4) The psychological damage caused by war is far more significant than the physical injury, as a mental wound is harder to heal and cure. In the novel “The Yellow Birds” by Kevin Powers, the story is based on a twenty-one years old soldier, John Bartle, and his experience in the war. Power takes the reader into Bartle’s mind, demonstrates the psychological injury caused by war and long-lasting trauma that remains with a soldier postwar. Sebastian Junger gives an idea of tribalization in his Ted Talk and book “Tribe”, it explains why veterans miss war and a non-tribalized society exacerbating PTSD symptoms. Sarah Boseley’s article “PTSD more likely to affect people in affluent countries, scientists say” explains the reasons for post-traumatic stress disorder may be less common in countries where the more traumatic event occurred. Brue P. Dohrenwend’s article “Why Some Soldiers develop PTSD While Others Don’t” shows combat exposure is not the only cause of PTSD, other factors like pre-war vulnerabilities and involvement in harming civilians also contribute to symptoms of PTSD. Most Veterans experienced PTSD is not only because of what happened in the battlefield during wartime but more importantly about what happened back in their home country pre-war time and postwar time, as young soldiers are too immature to accept the cruelty of the war and experiencing alienation after return to the home country. After soldiers return to their home country, they find it’s hard to adapt to the society they were born. In Power’s novel, Bartle feels severely alienated from a society that doesn’t understand the true nature of war, which makes it more difficult for him to reintegrate back into civilian life. The feeling of alienation aggravates Bartle’s psychological issue as he has a hard time to find anyone he could trust or share the same perspective about the war. In Powers’ novel, Bartle speaks with an airport bartender, who speaks ignorantly and disparagingly about the Iraqi people, claiming they are all savages, to which Bartle responds by saying, “Yeah, man. Something like that” (Powers 106). Bartle is lack of response and intends to end the conversation; shows he doesn’t fully agree with bartender’s statement. He does not want to explain more to the bartender as he knows civilians are hard to understand real war situation since they are far away from the battlefield. In his book, Junger claims that soldiers often have a difficult time reintegrating back into society because many citizens don’t understand the reality of combat, stating, “The closer the public is to the actual combat, the better the war will be understood and the less difficulty soldiers will have when they come home” (Junger 96). As the bartender is far away from the actual combat, his assumption is never accurate. Civilians are receiving information about the war from media, and the media does not show much cruelty about the war but more propaganda. Bartender’s information about “enemy” comes from the media, which is subjective. That is the reason for making that ignorant statement. Bartle does not feel the same way since he experienced the war. Bartender’s statement reminds Bartle of the difference between how civilians perceive the war and veterans perceive the war. Bartle finds it’s tough to be back with a different perspective about the war. In Powers’ novel, after the bartender offers to pay for Bartle’s drinks as thanks for his military service, Bartle refuses, stating, “‘Forget it. I want to pay.’ I didn’t want to smile and say thanks; Didn’t want to pretend I’d done anything except for survive” (Power 107). Bartender offering Bartle a free drink as a special honor, he refuses that offer because he feels like a fraud as a noble. Accepting the drink symbolize accepting the status as a hero, that special feeling alienates Bartle from civilians, and it reminds the horrible memory from the war. Veterans do not want to feel special or different, any special treatments become the distance of soldiers and civilians. In his book, Junger claims that public meaning, which gives soldiers a context for their losses and sacrifices that is acknowledged by most of the society, isn’t generated by formulaic phrases or token acts, stating, “Token acts only deepen the chasm between the military and civilian population by highlighting the fact that some people serve their country but the vast majority don’t” (Junger 97). Bartender’s free offer is a token act that honors Bartle as a hero. Although token acts are meant to glorify soldiers, they separate civilian and soldiers and recall soldiers’ painful memory about the war. Token acts are a superficial sense of charity and do not truly help soldiers while learning their true war experiences and eliminating the distance help soldiers to adapt to society faster. Power chooses to depict such difficulties in his novel as Bartle has a difficult time reintegrating into postwar life, demonstrating the society should be more cohesive and united for veterans recover their mental injury caused by war. As Junger mentions in his Ted Talk that the fundamental problems that occurred on veterans aren’t about them, but the rest of the society. Civilians should give soldiers opportunities to share their losses and sacrifice in the war, moreover acknowledge them as a unified society. This relieves soldiers’ guilty and rage that developed among soldiers in a war that doesn’t seem to end. Research resources: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jul/27/posttraumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd-more-likely-to-affectpeople-in-affluent-countries-scientists-say https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/w hy-some-soldiers-develop-ptsd-while-others-dont.html https://www.ted.com/talks/sebastian_junger_our_lonely_society_makes_it_hard_to_c ome_home_from_war/transcript?language=zh-cn&from=singlemessage#t-796170 ...
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Surname 1
English Composition 102

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May 5, 2019

PTSD among Veterans is Not a Direct Consequence of Events of The War but Rather
Events That Take Place Prior and Post-War

War period is a very trying moment for soldiers, their families and the entire society.
Since every side is determined to win, war results in massive damage of property as well as
loss of lives. Families lose their loved ones. In the same note, governments lose their
treasured resources, including soldiers and war weapons. However, apart from this physical
loss and damage, soldiers undergo immense mental and psychological loss and pain. The
worst aspect of this psychological and mental loss is the fact that no one seems to understand
the psychological injury that soldiers undergo after a period of war (Vujanovic et al. 15). This
pain is normally referred to as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). According to Vujanovic
et al. (15), PTSD refers to a mental health condition that is triggered by a terrifying event,
which includes witnessing or experiencing such an event. Some of the symptoms of PTSD
include severe anxiety, nightmares as well as uncontrollable thoughts regarding the event.
Normally, PTSD is as a result of the mental damage resulting from the event. The novel, The
Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers depicts a perfect example of a case of PTSD. This story is
based on the wartime and the post-war time of John Bartle, a 21 year old soldier. In this
novel, the Kevin takes the reader into Bartle’s mind in order to show the psychological injury
caused by war and long-lasting trauma that remains with a soldier postwar. This is well

Surname 2
illustrated in Sebastian Junger’s Ted Talk and book named “Tribe.” In this talk, Sebastian
explains the idea of tribalization and why veterans miss war and how the non-tribalized
society exacerbates PTSD symptoms. Several scholars have written on the topic of PTSD.
For example, in an article published by Brue P. Dohrenwend, he explains the various reasons
why some soldiers are likely to develop PTSD while it is difficult for other soldiers to
develop PTSD. It is arguably that majority of the war veterans do not experience PTSD
because of the actual war but instead because...

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Anonymous
Excellent job

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