RS334 Georgian Court Right to Die Ethical & Religious Perspectives Research Paper

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RS334

Georgian Court University

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Make sure you do the following:

  1. Clearly identify the issue.
  2. Identify allrelevant positions on the issue.
  3. Incorporate at least one religious perspective. This does not mean you have to agree with this perspective. I just want you to demonstrate that you can thoughtfully engage and dialogue with a religious perspective. Some good texts to consider are the ethical statements by the various religious bodies, some of which we are reading, as well as resources in the course text.
  4. In addition to course texts, a minimum of THREE (3) scholarly journal/professional articles must also be researched and used in the paper. GCU offers a wealth of resources for students through the library – electronic professional and scholarly journals.
  5. Take a position on the issue, and thoroughly support your position.
  6. Properly cite your sources.
  7. Include a bibliography.
  8. YOU CAN ONLY USE THE SOURCES I PROVIDED AND YOU CAN ADD ANY IF SO

I ALREADY HAVE THE THESIS/OUTLINE FOR YOU AND THE BIBLIOGRAPHY!!!!

with professors comments and little details to fix that will be given when the question is accepted !! the majority of it just writing the paper.

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Research Paper on an Ethical Issue in Health Care For this assignment, you will write an 8-10 page, double-spaced, research paper on an ethical issue of your choice. There are two stipulations. The issue you choose must have something directly to do with ethics, and it MUST involve a religious perspective (as per the course description). Examples of such issues could include (but are not limited to): • • • • • The “Right to Die”: Ethical and Religious Perspectives Criminal Justice and Religious Perspectives Religious Views on Care for the Environment Care for the Poor: What are Our Ethical and Religious Responsibilities? ???? If you have other ideas for topics, I am more than willing to consider them. Just email me and I will offer some guidance. Make sure you do the following: 1. Clearly identify the issue. 2. Identify all relevant positions on the issue. 3. Incorporate at least one religious perspective. This does not mean you have to agree with this perspective. I just want you to demonstrate that you can thoughtfully engage and dialogue with a religious perspective. Some good texts to consider are the ethical statements by the various religious bodies, some of which we are reading, as well as resources in the course text. 4. In addition to course texts, a minimum of THREE (3) scholarly journal/professional articles must also be researched and used in the paper. GCU offers a wealth of resources for students through the library – electronic professional and scholarly journals. 5. Take a position on the issue, and thoroughly support your position. 6. Properly cite your sources. 7. Include a bibliography. Annotated Bibliography Gandsman, Ari. “Paradox of Choice and the Illusion of Autonomy: The Construction of Ethical Subjects in Right-to-Die Activism.” Death Studies, vol. 42, no. 5, May 2018, pp. 329– 335. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/07481187.2017.1396646 This article is about the benefits of having the self-government and/or the ability to have the rights to die. The article decides to use a study of people who are in favor of the rights-to-die in Australia and North America and how these people understand the concept of a “good death”. It reveals how this may be concealing larger ethical considerations. Written by an author with an affiliation with the School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies at the University of Ottawa, the article is a reliable source to use on topics involving ethics. The goal of the source is to recognize the many ethical considerations that may be masked by the larger “autonomy” focus. This presents the idea that autonomy and an individual’s own “rational calculation” might not be enough to consider it ethical. It provides an example for a negative argument in the ethics of the right to die. It suggests that when it comes to ethical considerations on this topic, it helps to be skeptical because what may present as a valuable reason for being ethical may be masking less ethical considerations. Neubauer-Shani, Michal. “The Dynamics of State-Religion Issues on the Agenda in Israel: The Case of the Right to Die with Dignity (Passive Euthanasia).” Israel Affairs, vol. 17, no. 2, Apr. 2011, pp. 208–223. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1080/13537121.2011.547275. This article is about how the relations between the religion and state in Israel influence issues that are added to the agenda. It includes an example issue of the right to die by passive euthanasia. The actual law about it is very obscure, taking almost two decades to actually regulate. The author of the article is affiliated with the Ashhkelon Academic College in Israel. The article was featured in the Israel Affairs journal. It gives a reliable look into how the socio-political issues can influence the issue of the right to die. This article shows how issues, with the specific example of passive euthanasia, are influenced by the political and religious climate of a country. In the case of Israel, the influence was unconcentrated in firmly enforcing the laws that were created for the issue. It brings up the question of whether this ethical issue should be handled by either the state or religion, because the relation between both did not lead to an encouraging outcome. Orentlicher, David. “International Perspectives on Physician Assistance in Dying.” Hastings Center Report, vol. 46, no. 6, Nov. 2016, pp. 6–7. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1002/hast.641. This article describes how the Supreme Court of Canada’s legislation for “medical assistance in dying can be compared to two different models: the Dutch-Belgian approach and a more American one. The former is more of a broad right to assistance in dying, while the latter is a much narrower right. The article suggests there are two main factors related to these models: the role that religion plays, and the trust people have in their government and healthcare systems. The article was published in the “Hastings Center Report”, which is an acadmic journal in bioethics. This journal provides articles on ethical issues in medicine, the life sciences and professions. It is a crucial reliable source in a discussion on the right to die. This article suggests multiple cases of influence on the right to die. First, it shows the influence that the government of a coutry can have, and that even this country may be influenced by others. Furthermore, the article touches on the fact that religion and people’s trust in healthcare holds a major influence. Pablo Ortega Topic: The “Right to Die”: Ethical and Religious Perspectives Thesis: The right to die is a very difficult idea to consider from both ethical and religious perspectives, which becomes apparent from scholars such as, Shani-Neubauer, Stacey, and Grandsman. The obscurity that surrounds it – whether coming from a religious entity, a government, or those that could be considered fairly qualified to argue about the topic – confirms this difficulty. When it comes to the right to die, it can be hard for anyone to decide what is ethical, even those who put laws regarding it in place. Because of this, I will argue that those who establish these laws should be more critical in what is actually influencing their perspectives on the topic. Introduction: - Introducing what physician assisted suicide and or euthanasia are. - Introducing sides of both ethical stand points and religious stand points - Thesis Section: Ethical Perspective - Explaining the ethical stand points - Introducing the source of “Paradox of choice and the Illusion of Autonomy: The construction of Ethical Subjects in Right-to-Die Activism” - Talking about the source. Section II: Religious Perspective - Explaining the religious perspective on euthanasia - Introducing sources of “The Dynamics of State-Religion Issues on the Agenda in Israel: The case of the Right to Die with Dignity (Passive Euthanasia).” - Further reasoning the source above - Weighing my opinion on it Section III: Legislation Perspective - Explaining how legislation - Explaining the factor of government - Bring the source of “International Perspectives on Physician Assistance in Dying” Section IV: Difficulty of all these perspectives - Explaining how the perspecitves counter eachother and how its hard to find one solution - Using readings and the mentioning of videos seen in class. Section V: My perspective and positioning on the issue - Explaining my side - Using resources from seen in class - Why it should be legal - Leaning on more of the ethical perspectives. - Countering religion Section VI: Conclusion -Summarizing all points -trying to give a resolution that would help ease all aspects to euthanasia
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Attached.

Running head: ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVES

The “Right to Die”: Ethical and Religious Perspectives
Name
Institutional Affiliation

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ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVES

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The “Right to Die”: Ethical and Religious Perspectives
Introduction
Life is defined as the state of being alive. As such, life is an important feature of any
living organism, be it human being, animals, or plants. Some individuals strongly hold that life
that is full of sadness, grief, torment, and agony is undeserving. For these individuals, the issue
of death is understood as a great and comfortable reprieve. On the other hand, death is
considered as being a journey that each soul must take. However, when it is prayed for and
ordained due to profound pain that is experienced, death significantly transforms and becomes
something that is embraced. In this sense, the issue of ‘right to die’ as well as the ‘end of life
choices’ that are profoundly established on the idea of euthanasia have created much debate in
relation to moral, religions, and legal concerns among care givers, governments, communities,
and the dying. The right to die is a very difficult idea to consider from both ethical and religious
perspectives, which become apparent from scholars such as, Shani-Neubauer, Stacey, and
Grandsman. The obscurity that surrounds it – whether coming from a religious entity, a
government, or those that could be considered fairly qualified to argue about the topic – confirms
this difficulty. When it comes to the right to die, it can be hard for anyone to decide what is
ethical, even those who put laws regarding it in place. Because of this, I will argue that those
who establish these laws should be more critical in what is actually influencing their perspectives
on the topic.
Section: Ethical Perspective
Physician-aided death and euthanasia remain controversial subjects within the field of
medical law and ethics. In this debate, many arguments have been offered, some against the
ethical tolerability and legal practicality of physician-assisted suicide. According to Orentlicher

ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVES

3

(2016), the Canadian legislation regarding medical assistance in dying could be compared to
two, but different perspectives. The first perspective that Orentlicher (2016) presents is the
Dutch-Belgian approach. The perspective is the America approach. Orentlicher (2016) argues
that the Dutch-Belgian perspective is much of a broad right to medical assisted dying as
compared to the American approach, which is somewhat narrow. The author also argues that
there are two fundamental factors, which are related the above two perspectives. One of these
factors is the role that religion performs. The second factor relates to the level of trust that people
have placed in their governments as well as healthcare organizations. Equally, the author also
claims that there are many underlying cases that fundamentally work to influence the right of
people to die, including the influence of the government and religion. The author says that Dutch
patients that make a request to be given aid in dying are more likely to face restrictions than
those who do not make such requests. In addition, Dutch doctors also usually decline such
requests most of the time, especially for patients that are depressed. Canada has also recently
legalized assisted dying, even though with higher r...


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