CUNY Hunter College Anne Rices Interview with the Vampire Analysis Paper

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PROMPT AND TOPIC:

Anne Rice’s Interview with the Vampire(1976) radically humanized vampires and opened the floodgate for contemporary representations of the “undead” in mass culture as figures that are “just like us, just better.” As always in vampire fiction, Rice’s vampire characters served as representations of fears, hopes, and existential despair of her age, America of the 1970s.

In the paper, consider the central character of Louis de Pointe du Lac, in relation to other characters(Lestat, Claudia, Armand), as a representation of a new, “sympathetic” and reluctant vampire for the new modern times, a post-sacred world where “God is dead” (Nietzsche) and any total, universal meaning is lost. As you do so, you might want toconsider various elements of the novel: narration (how the story is told, who gets to speak); character-building/development; plot and structure of the novel; relation of the vampires’ representation to the preceding, especially Romantic, tradition (that of “Romantic friendship” with a fascinating but unavailable friend, the figure of a dandy, Byronic individualism; Gothic tradition); issues of identity, morality, virtue, despair, and search for meaning (who looks for meaning, what answers they find—or do not find). At the end, you might want toconsider the ending of the novel: the “overwhelming sadness” of Lestat’s end, whether Louis is successful/unsuccessful in his project (interview) and his identity struggle, and whether there is irony in the ending. You might want (but do not have to) compare it to the ending of Neil Jordan’s film “Interview with the Vampire” (1994, a different era from the mid-1970s, when the novel was written).

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This is the Final take-home paper No research is required on the paper, only textual analysis. However, if you still want to use any external source, please use quotation marks and include reference to the source (either as a foot- or endnote). All quotes from the texts that you use to illustrate your point should be attributed. All of you are using different paperback editions of the novel, so please include the edition in the bibliography at the end and put pages in the references. As a reader, I should be able to find and verify quotes, if necessary. Don’t use very lengthy quotes. Quotes should be introduced and well integrated into the body of your essay (syntactically and grammatically, your sentence with a quote should be coherent and make sense). Remember that a quote should be necessary as an illustration of the argument and not used merely to cite a “fact” from the plot (e.g. “They went on a journey together”—such quotes are not necessary). Finally, try to construct an argument (basically: what is the idea I want to prove in this paper? In the end: what transpired as a result of finding these “proofs”? What are the implications of my findings?; do not simply retell the plot). PROMPT AND TOPIC: Anne Rice’s Interview with the Vampire (1976) radically humanized vampires and opened the floodgate for contemporary representations of the “undead” in mass culture as figures that are “just like us, just better.” As always in vampire fiction, Rice’s vampire characters served as representations of fears, hopes, and existential despair of her age, America of the 1970s. In the paper, consider the central character of Louis de Pointe du Lac, in relation to other characters (Lestat, Claudia, Armand), as a representation of a new, “sympathetic” and reluctant vampire for the new modern times, a post-sacred world where “God is dead” (Nietzsche) and any total, universal meaning is lost. As you do so, you might want to consider various elements of the novel: narration (how the story is told, who gets to speak); character-building/development; plot and structure of the novel; relation of the vampires’ representation to the preceding, especially Romantic, tradition (that of “Romantic friendship” with a fascinating but unavailable friend, the figure of a dandy, Byronic individualism; Gothic tradition); issues of identity, morality, virtue, despair, and search for meaning (who looks for meaning, what answers they find—or do not find). At the end, you might want to consider the ending of the novel: the “overwhelming sadness” of Lestat’s end, whether Louis is successful/unsuccessful in his project (interview) and his identity struggle, and whether there is irony in the ending. You might want (but do not have to) compare it to the ending of Neil Jordan’s film “Interview with the Vampire” (1994, a different era from the mid-1970s, when the novel was written). ...
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CompEngineerHarold
School: Duke University

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Introduction






The initial vampire stories ever circulated were prepared as jokes. While various stories
hinted on sentiment and interest, vampires were not deeply portrayed, most had fangs and
were bloodlust. The vampires mostly had similar appearances, for instance, some were
pale, young and bolstered exclusively off young humans.
Interview with the Vampire (1976) totally altered the vampire field by making them long
for other things besides blood. In the story, Louis longs for ethical restoration for his
iniquities, while Claudia longs to find out about their origin, and Armand longs to have a
companion in immortality.
Rice additionally gives the vampires intricate sentimental feelings like desire and
sensuality, despite the fact that her characters infrequently engage in sexual relations.
Based on this titillating phase, the present vampire sentiment was conceived.

Louis de Pointe du Lac



Louis is the main character who recounts his story in an interview. During the 1790s the
demise of his sibling makes him to engage in self-destructive actions, which leads him to
allow Lestat to make him a vampire.
When he yields to his craving for human blood, he pursues his very own strict ethical
standard, just murdering unfamiliar people. He additionally won't make novel vampires
since he feels guilty for the demise and devastation that such novel vampires can unleash.

Point of View




Even though it is precisely a third-individual portrayal, the person doing the interview
within the story talks so seldom, interposing just to pose minor inquiries of Louis. The
story unfurls like a first-individual account, enabling the reader to turn into the quiet
questioner.
Although his story unfolds over two centuries, it essentially centers on roughly the initial
seventy-five years as a vampire. He appears to review everything with lucidity. In the
time after the demise of Claudia, the time wherein he lost mortality, he has tried to
thoroughly consider those initial occasions, making them into the account he intends on
sharing.

Morality




Having been a mortal and also a vampire, Louis cannot satisfy his own ethical standards.
After the death of Paul, Louis becomes an immoral individual. As a vampire, he thinks
that he is a “wolf in sheep's clothing” instead of the defective people he wants to be like
(Rice, 55).
One can't go too far into abhorrence and never be able to choose goodness again. They
both concur that there is little proof of God on the planet, and therefore little proof of the
devil, whom God made, if they existed. Armand endeavors to contend that without both
deities, detestable and sin are nonexistent.

Work cited
Rice, Anne. Interview with the vampire: A novel. Vol. 1. Random House Digital, Inc., 1977.


Surname1
Name
Lecturer
Course
Institution
Date
Interview with the vampire
Vampire Literature
The initial vampire stories ever circulated were prepared as jokes. While various stories
hinted on sentiment and interest, vampires were not deeply portrayed, most had fangs and were
bloodlust. The vampires mostly had similar appearances, for instance, some were pale, young
and bolstered exclusively off young humans. However, ...

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Anonymous
awesome work thanks

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