The Protestant Reformation in Europe Essay

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What were the forces or issues that led to the Protestant Reformation in Europe and how were

these articulated by Martin Luther? How did the Catholic Church respond to this challenge to its

authority? What were the longer terms effects of the Reformation across Europe, for example in

England, France, and Germany?

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Running head: THE PROTESTANT REFORMATION

The Protestant Reformation
Student’s Name
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THE PROTESTANT REFORMATION

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The Protestant Reformation
In the last millennium, The Protestant Reformation has become one of the most farreaching and ground-breaking movements. This movement terminated the ancient hegemony and
the ancient supremacy of the Catholic Church in Western Europe. Led by Martin Luther, John
Calvin, their movement resulted in far-reaching social, economic and political effects.
Reformation grew to become the ground in which the foundation of Protestantism built, branching
out to the major branches of the Christian faith, altering the economic and political fortunes. The
actions of Luther brought about a complete host of new doctrines, religious practices, and
organizations, the rise of such as Anglicanism and Calvinism, even altering the daily family life
(Becker, 2016). This ultimately resulted in bloody religious wars due to the divide between the
between Catholics and Protestants which have fashioned western Europe to what is known to date.
Even though it all began in 1517 with Martin Luther nailing his “95 Thesis” at the entrance to the
Castle Church a church door, its roots can be traced back to the Waldensian movements in France,
Italy and Spain in the 12th and 13th centuries.
16th century Reformation was unprecedented, as stated earlier, reformers had already
preexisted such Valdes (Waldesnsians), John Wycliffe, Jan Hus, and in the St. Francis of Assisi
church. They sought to address certain aspects of the Christian church before 1517. In this era,
Erasmus of Rotterdam, a renowned scholar, was a key advocate of broadminded reforms. The
reformer was against the common Catholic superstitions and strongly attacked the church, arguing
and crediting that the Christian faith ought to be a guiding o...


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