ENG124 GCCCD Graphic Novels and Comics Can Move a Story Analysis

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ENG124

Grossmont Cuyamaca Community College District

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I will have all directions and articles attached.

Use the two articles I used in my essay that I began. Reference off of the essay I began, and feel free to just add to it or change things however you would like. It must bee 1500-2000 words total. I have my thesis highlighted in yellow, and topic sentences highlighted in green. Each body paragraph focuses on a single topic, which the attached pdf titled "guidelines" will show each of the topic we could choose from. there are 4 body paragraphs total.

My teacher reviewed what I have completed so far, and had commentary. I will attach her commentary so that you know what to fix. Thank you!

Teacher Commentary:

Michelle: Overall, you are on the right track, though you don't have a lot written here. Hopefully, seeing the student sample papers this week will help you out with the writing process. Here are a few specific things to keep in mind: 1) Don't forget a header. 2) Come up with an original title that not only includes the topic of graphic novels/comic books but also indicates that this paper will perform a rhetorical analysis. 3) Work on semi-colon vs. comma use. 4) Thesis is on the right track, but what specific rhetorical elements can you come up with besides evidence? Examples and personal experience are part of evidence. Look to your topic sentences for examples of what I mean, such as counterargument, appeals, etc. 5) Your topic sentences look great. Just be sure to put whatever rhetorical element you're comparing in bold.

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Comparative Rhetorical Analysis You have been exploring the topic of comic books and graphic novels, and have read four articles: 1. “A Comic-Book World” by Stephen E. Tabachnick 2. “Beyond Graphic Novels: Illustrated Scholarly Discourse and the History of Educational Comics” by Aaron Humphrey 3. “How Graphic Novels and Comics Can Move a Story” by Melina Delkic 4. “The Art of Words and Pictures” by Rachel Cooke Choose two articles—either #1 & #2 or #3 & #4—and write a comparative rhetorical analysis, answering the following key question: Key Question Of the two articles, which author crafted a more effective argument, and why?  Purpose: Analyze and evaluate rhetorical choices in complex traditional texts (SLO #1).  Audience: Someone who is interested in comic books and graphic novels but unfamiliar with the articles.  Point-of-View: 3rd person (avoid “I” or “you” pronouns in this paper)  Requirements: o The MLA-formatted essay must be 1,500-2,000 words. No Works Cited page is necessary since I provided the articles for you. o Students must highlight their essays in Microsoft Word or Google Docs using the pattern below before submitting the rough draft or final draft on Canvas. In both the rough draft and final draft submission area, there is a highlighted student sample to help you with this.  Thesis=Yellow (Introduction)  Topic Sentences=Green (One per body paragraph)  Topics=Bold (One per body paragraph)  Tips for Being Successful: o Your essay should focus on evaluating the authors’ arguments for effectiveness and should avoid personal opinions regarding the topic of comic books/graphic novels. In other words, this is not an agree/disagree exercise. o Choose an effective structure for your paper. Here is a suggested pattern:  Introduction:  Begin with 1-2 sentences about the topic: comic books/graphic novels.  Summarize each of the articles and consider addressing T-GAP for each one at this point. In other words, briefly summarize each author’s tone, genre, audience, purpose, and 1-2 main claims they made in their articles.   End with a thesis statement that answers the key question specifically. Body Paragraphs:  Aim for 4-6 body paragraphs.  In each topic sentence, be sure to address BOTH articles, and make a claim about which one did a better job using the strategy you are going to discuss.  Below is a list of possible questions you could answer in your body paragraphs. Choose one per paragraph: o Which author had stronger claims and a line of reasoning? o Which author had reasonable assumptions? o Which author had stronger evidence? o Which author had more effective or varied organizational strategies? o Which author used the rhetorical appeals more effectively? (You can cover all three appeals in one paragraph, or you could split them up over several paragraphs). o Which author avoided fallacies or had fewer fallacies? (If neither article contained fallacies, then don’t use this topic.) o Which author had more effective literary devices? o Which author acknowledged a counterargument and provided a refutation? If both, which one did it more effectively?  Conclusion:  Begin by restating your thesis in different words (do not copy and paste).  Reiterate your key points.  End with a global (general statement) about the topic of comic books/graphic novels or the importance of rhetorical analysis. o In the end, be sure to avoid claiming one article was perfect and the other was completely ineffective. Acknowledge the strengths and weaknesses of both, and then make an informed decision about which article was more effective overall. How Graphic Novels and Comics Can Move a Story By Melina Delkic May 28, 2018 The New York Times The Times’s Books desk has recently hired two graphic novels and comics columnists, and an editorial cartoon series just won a Pulitzer. Jake Halpern had been thinking about how to make people care about issues that were tough to read about — especially the plight of the modern refugee. He had written lengthy narratives about refugees in The New Yorker, and was used to deep-dive, text-based articles that sometimes attracted limited audiences. At the end of a long day, he said, “The idea of reading about other people’s misery is a hard sell, even for people with the best of intentions.” So he was intrigued and optimistic when Bruce Headlam, then an opinion editor at The Times, suggested that he approach the refugee story through a visual medium — the graphic narrative. About 18 months after the initial conversations, he and the illustrator Michael Sloan won a Pulitzer Prize for their graphic narrative series, “Welcome to the New World.” It was somewhat novel for The Times. Comic strips have rarely appeared in the paper, sometimes to the chagrin of our readers. And Mr. Halpern and Mr. Sloan’s Pulitzer was The Times’s first win for editorial cartooning. Even though the graphic novel long ago became a serious literary genre in countries like France and Japan, in America, the movement’s growth has been comparatively slow or niche. But that’s changing. Recently, the Books desk hired two graphic novels and comics columnists, Hillary Chute and Ed Park, to write alternating monthly reviews featuring graphic narratives, organized into categories, like black-and-white stories or, this month, stories featuring emotional absence. “I think there’s something really special that can happen when you bring together images and words in the way comics do,” said Gal Beckerman, an editor for the Book Review. When it comes to the kinds of difficult subject matters that can feel abstract in text — sometimes “hitting the boundaries of language alone,” as he said — comics can make those issues feel distinctly tangible. “It’s an art,” said Pamela Paul, editor of the Book Review. “I’m blown away by the quality of storytelling.” While working on “Welcome to the New World,” Mr. Halpern said he was pleasantly surprised by how quickly readers of various age groups could move through the story — almost “too quickly,” he said, for the hours upon hours of work each of the narrative’s 20 parts required. Part of its accessibility was Mr. Sloan’s “warm drawings” of the characters, he said. “The characters kind of brim with humanity,” instead of with some of the darker aspects other war-related graphic novels have highlighted in characters, Mr. Halpern noted. Comics can evoke meaning from small moments like pauses in conversation, nuances of facial expression and internal turmoil. Mr. Beckerman said that some comics, like Nick Drnaso’s “Sabrina,” which Mr. Park reviews in his upcoming column, highlight the “internal quality of the human mind” in a deep way. In “Welcome to the New World,” textless or “silent” panels underscore a family’s shock in discovering that its home has been destroyed; a mother’s sleepless, anxiety-ridden night; a child’s wonder at seeing snow from his window. Mr. Sloan said those moments were inspired by the often entirely silent comics of Frans Masereel, a Flemish graphic artist. “There’s this beautiful economy that happens with pictures and images when you combine them with words or the absence of words,” Mr. Beckerman said. But, editors caution, beautiful illustration is not enough to hold up a story; it has to move the story forward and work in conjunction with the text. “Sometimes, a book can be really artistically beautiful, but it’s not working well with the text,” said Ms. Paul. And so the genre’s reviewers must be art critics as much as they are literary critics. Marrying the two is a skill that can take a lifetime of practice and learning by example. Mr. Sloan, who has been an illustrator for over 25 years, grew up with comics like “Peanuts” and “Pogo.” “As a child, it was something I immediately responded to,” he said. “I liked having the story told visually and also as a text narrative.” That’s part of why the format has seen an explosion in books for children and young adults. “There’s a realization that being able to follow visual storytelling is such a part of learning how to read,” said Maria Russo, the children’s books editor at The Times, “and many kids remain visually oriented even after they’re reading words.” When she interviews young readers for her column in The New York Times For Kids, a monthly print-only special section, she finds that “easily half” of the children name graphic novels as their favorite books. In some ways, she noted, there’s not much difference between graphic novels for children and adults. Pénélope Bagieu’s “Brazen,” for instance, published as an adult book in France, but a young adult book in the United States. “If they are different, it’s sometimes only because people are writing them with easier words. Often you’ll find the deeper themes are pretty consistent,” Ms. Russo said. “Children and grown-ups aren’t that different.” Melina Delkic is a senior staff editor. @MelinaDelkic ! Looking to get into reading graphic novels? Try these recommendations for seminal graphic novels and comics, from the Book Review’s Gal Beckerman and Maria Russo. For novices and longtime fans alike, these are must-reads. Children’s Books • • • • • • • • Nimona, Noelle Stevenson Bone, Jeff Smith Amulet, Kazu Kibuishi Smile, Raina Telgemeier American Born Chinese, Gene Luen Yang Olympians, George O’Connor Roller Girl, Victoria Jamieson Be Prepared, Vera Brosgol • • • This One Summer, Mariko and Jillian Tamaki Zita the Spacegirl, Ben Hatke Lost in NYC: A Graphic Adventure, Nadja Spiegelman Adult Books • • • • • • • • • • • Black Hole, Charles Burns Killing and Dying, Adrian Tomine Fun Home, Alison Bechdel Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth, Chris Ware Here, Richard McGuire Sabrina, Nick Drnaso Maus, Art Spiegelman, One Hundred Demons, Lynda Barry Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi Palestine, Joe Sacco My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, Emil Ferris THE NEW STATESMAN 25 SEPTEMBER 2006 The Art of Words and Pictures The memoir is now a staple of every self-respecting publishing list, though only rarely are these offerings up to much. The other day, however, I read a really good one. Fun Home is by an American writer, Alison Bechdel, and it tells the story of a childhood: of a girl who grows up in an inward-looking Pennsylvanian town called Beech Creek (population: 800), in a vast Victorian house with which her father - a distant and pernickety funeral director - appears to be deeply in love. The house features "astral lamps and girandoles and Hepplewhite suite chairs", which are not terribly common in places like Beech Creek. Alison can't understand it - or not at first. Then, slowly, she comes to see that restoring the house provides her father with a kind of release. For he is not just a lover of fine furniture; her father is also, secretly, a lover of boys. Fun Home is fantastic: minutely observed and keenly nuanced. But it is also special for another reason. Bechdel is a graphic artist, and she has put down the story of her relationship with her father - who eventually throws himself under a truck - in strip form. Of course, memoirs have been done in this way before, notably Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, about growing up in post-revolutionary Iran. But in Fun Home, Bechdel appears to have moved into new territory. Her book, it seems to me, is genuinely genre-busting because, while her drawings are just as accomplished as those of a great graphic artist such as Robert Crumb, she has made her words count as much as her pictures. "Very few cartoonists can also write," said Sean Wilsey, in a rave review of Bechdel's book in the New York Times. "But Fun Home quietly succeeds in telling a story . . . through words that are equally revealing and well chosen." Or as Dan Franklin, Bechdel's publisher at Cape, puts it: "I think it is a breakthrough [for graphic storytelling]. The words are as good as the pictures, which is not always the case." Fun Home is one of several graphic novels (for this, confusingly, is how the book is being marketed, even though it is a work of non-fiction) that are busy helping lay to rest the form's tired old image. Graphic novels always used to be thought of as geeky: written by geeks, read by geeks. The geeks in question had lank hair and fetid bedrooms, and probably liked listening to thrash. There were, I admit, always those who were willing to make the case for the graphic novel's greatness, but no one really listened. Yeah, right, I always used to think when my brother extolled its virtues. But we're still talking about comics, aren't we? Then things started to change. In the past few years, the graphic novel has crept out of the adolescent shadows and started to become not just more respectable (the biggest publisher of graphic novels in the UK is Cape, better known as the home of Julian Barnes and Ian McEwan), but fashionable. Fans include Zadie Smith and Nick Hornby. 1 Why? How did this happen? After all, there have been brief bursts of enthusiasm before. In the mid-1980s, when Art Spiegelman's Maus was published to huge acclaim (Maus tells the story of Spiegelman's father, Vladek, a Polish Jew and a survivor of Auschwitz; Spiegelman draws the Jews as mice, and the Nazis as cats), a lot of fans thought this was it: graphic novels would now take their rightful place beside Amis and Austen on the shelves at Waterstone's. But it was a false dawn. Then, in 2001, the Guardian First Book Award was given, controversially, to Chris Ware for Jimmy Corrigan: the smartest kid on earth, a tale of urban loneliness. This was significant: the award was proof - or evidence, at least - that a graphic novel could provide many, if not all, of the same things as a conventional novel. Who knows if this spurred others on, but thereafter more textured and complex graphic novels began appearing - and people like me (a non-geek, I think) started reading them. Over the past year, I have devoured every graphic novel that has come my way. This has been deeply enjoyable. If there is a better book about the experience of living as a woman in an Islamic state than Persepolis, I have yet to find it (Persepolis also tells the casual reader everything he or she needs to know about the rise of modern Iran - and in just 153 pages). I also loved Black Hole by Charles Burns, a dystopian thriller set in 1970s Seattle, where the city's teenagers are stalked by a sexually transmitted plague. But Bechdel has surpassed them all. It is her voice that grabs: her wry detachment. It turns out that she is gay, too, and in Fun Home she sets her absent girliness against her father's missing butchness, a contrast that works especially well in the strip form. In one drawing, she is wearing a pinafore over a striped T-shirt. "Who cares if the necklines don't match?" she is saying, arms spread wide. "Yellow turtleneck. Now," says the bubble emerging from her father's mouth. 2 Nick Hornby is one of Bechdel's admirers. "I like it that you can have a satisfying literary experience in a couple of hours," he says. "And Fun Home is as satisfying a literary experience as you're likely to have this year. It's not possible, I think, for a graphic novel to be as patiently and complicatedly internal as the best fiction, but then, that's not possible for cinema, either. But the best graphic novels are punchy, immediately emotional, capable of sudden, surprising tonal shifts, and more likely to make you laugh than a lot of literary novels." Hornby isn't surprised that graphic novels are becoming more sophisticated, only that it took so long. "Many of us grew up reading comics - they taught me to read - so it's not surprising that a whole generation of people would want to use the form for more serious and ambitious writing and drawing." But are they selling? Because it is only when they sell that they will really enter the mainstream. According to Dan Franklin, they do, even if Waterstone's et al are not entirely seduced just yet. For Franklin, the commercial light bulb first came on over his head in 1998, when Raymond Briggs's Ethel and Ernest landed on his desk. Briggs had always been published by a children's division, but when he delivered this book, about his parents' marriage, it was clear that it was actually for adults. "So I did it," says Franklin. "And it sold 120,000 copies, which rather focused my mind." In 2000, Franklin acquired Daniel Clowes's Ghost World, a graphic novel that became a film starring Thora Birch. "Two slutty girls who hang out in diners, and one of them's called Enid Coleslaw. I thought: this is my kind of book! Suddenly, it all made sense." He believes that graphic novels can make better commercial sense for a publisher than some overhyped first novel, because they can often be picked up for a relative song, and even the least popular of them will go on to sell at least 5,000 copies (this is a lot more than some first novels). Persepolis sold more than 10,000 copies in hardback, and 50 times that in the US. But there are those who are yet to be convinced. "Some people don't know how to read them," Franklin says. "They get a headache." To counteract this problem, several books have come out offering advice - such as Graphic Novels: stories to change your life by Paul Gravett, who organises Comica, an annual celebration of the form at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London. He tries to dispel people's fears one by one. Hate the babble of speech balloons? Tune in to one at a time. Dislike the drawing? You just haven't read the right books. He points out that Satrapi, whose new novel, Chicken With Plums, is published next month (around the same time as the film of Persepolis wraps), did not come to comics until she was 25. "It's like opera," she has said. "You have to go a couple of times to appreciate it." Whether it's an acquired taste or not, Gravett remains convinced - and I agree with him - that this could be a kind of golden age for the graphic novel. He likes to quote Harvey Pekar, the author of American Splendor, who said: "Comics are just words and pictures. You can do anything with words and pictures." Or at least, very nearly anything. Rachel Cooke trained as a reporter on The Sunday Times. She is now a writer at The Observer. In the 2006 British Press Awards, she was named Interviewer of the Year. 3 Maroki 1 Michelle Maroki Professor Sarah Martin English 124 23 June 2019 Word Count: TITLE Throughout the course of literature; whether it is within books, magazines, or journals, the public has begun to adapt to a different method of reading or storytelling. This method does not include words, but illustrations. In the magazine article, “How Graphic Novels and Comics Can Move a Story”, the author, Melina Delkic, shares that cartoons are a much more effective way to produce emotions from people, especially when writing about the hardships that other people face. Delkic claims that including illustrations will not only evoke emotion from the public but it will also grasp the attention of their intended audience much more, supporting their claim that comics are more often read and analyzed than passages of words. This claim is also supported by author Rachel Cooke in her magazine article, “The Art of Words and Pictures”. In this article, Cooke states that graphic novels are becoming more respectable and fashionable. She believes that they can provide the same things that a conventional novel can, and that it is an effective way of telling stories. ​While analyzing and interpreting the two articles, as well as their claims, Delkic and Cooke each share their thoughts using different methods of expression, including evidence, examples, and personal experience, Maroki 2 although Delkic provided a much more convincing argument, presenting her thoughts in a better way. Within both articles, each author presented their arguments differently, yet I felt that Delkic’s arguments and reasoning in “How Graphic Novels and Comics Can Move a Story” were much more convincing and supported her argument best.​ In her article, she included a quote from Jake Halpern, stating “‘The idea of reading about other people’s misery is a hard sell, even for people with the best of intentions’” (3). Speaking from experience in writing these kinds of stories, Delkic includes a testimonial from Halpern, who has experience with this as well. She reasons with this argument by Not only did Delkic provide better reasoning and claims, but she also supported her main claims with stronger evidence than Cooke had.​ Throughout the article, Delkic provided real-life situations and examples that provided enough evidence to support her claims successfully. For example, Delkic shares, “ In addition to her many examples of strong evidence and claims, Delkic’s argument presented itself strongest because she included a counterargument and a rebuttal.​ This allows her to present herself as a reliable source, because she is able to successfully defend her argument using evidence. The use of rhetorical appeals is one of the most effective ways to present an argument or a claim, and Delkic successfully utilized each of the three rhetorical appeals in her article, proving her argument to be true. Maroki 2 When presenting an argument, having good reasoning, providing strong evidence, including counterarguments and rebuttals, and including rhetorical appeals are all methods of successfully supporting one’s argument.
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Attached.

Maroki 2

Michelle Maroki
Professor Sarah Martin
English 124
23 June 2019
Word Count: 1726
TITLE: Comparative Rhetorical Analysis on Importance of Comics and Graphical Novels
Introduction
Throughout the course of literature; whether it is within books, magazines, or journals,
the public has begun to adapt to a different method of reading or storytelling. This method does
not include words, but illustrations. In the magazine article, “How Graphic Novels and Comics
Can Move a Story”, the author Melina Delkic, shares that graphic narratives are a much more
effective way to produce emotions from people, especially when writing about the hardships that
other people face. Delkic claims that including illustrations will not only evoke emotion from the
public but it will also grasp the attention of their intended audience much more, supporting their
claim that comics are more often read and analyzed than passages of words. This claim is also
supported by author Rachel Cooke in her magazine article, “The Art of Words and Pictures”. In
this article, Cooke states that graphic novels are becoming more respectable and fashionable. She
believes that they can provide the same things that a conventional novel can, and that it is an
effective way of telling stories. While analyzing and interpreting the two articles, as well as their
claims, Delkic and Cooke each share their thoughts using different methods of expression,

Maroki 2
including evidence, rhetorical appeals, examples, and personal experience, although Delkic
provided a much more convincing argument, presenting her thoughts in a better way.
Use of outside sources
Within both articles, each author presented their arguments differently, yet I felt that
Delkic’s arguments and reasoning in “How Graphic Novels and Comics Can Move a Story”
were much more convincing and supported her argument best. In her article, she included a
quote from Jake Halpern, stating “The idea of reading about other people’s misery is a hard sell,
even for people with the best of intentions” (3). Through the integration of this quote, the author
is able to support her arguments better and persuade the reader into agreeing with her opinion on
the important of graphic...


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Awesome! Perfect study aid.

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