Hood College Latino Education Leadership Discussion

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Copyright © 2018. Information Age Publishing. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 12/13/2018 9:49 AM via TEXAS STATE UNIV AN: 1892651 ; Rodriguez, Cristobal, Martinez, Melissa A., Valle, Fernando.; Latino Educational Leadership : Serving Latino Communities and Preparing Latina/o Leaders Across the P-20 Pipeline Account: s8329666 1 Copyright © 2018. Information Age Publishing. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. Latino Educational Leadership: Serving Latino Communities and Preparing Latinx Leaders Across the P-20 Pipeline Latino Educational Leadership: Serving Latino Communities and Preparing Latinx Leaders Across the P-20 Pipeline Edited by Cristóbal Rodríguez Melissa A. Martinez Fernando Valle INFORMATION AGE PUBLISHING, INC. Charlotte, NC • www.infoagepub.com Copyright © 2018 Information Age Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, microfilming, recording or otherwise, without written permission from the publisher. Printed in the United States of America Library of Congress Cataloging-In-Publication Data Names: Rodrbiguez, Cristbobal, editor. | Martinez, Melissa A., editor. | Valle, Fernando. Title: Latino educational leadership : serving Latino communities and preparing Latinx leaders across the P-20 pipeline / edited by Cristbobal Rodrbiguez, Melissa A. Martinez, Fernando Valle. Description: Charlotte, NC : Information Age Publishing, Inc., [2018] | Includes bibliographical references. Identifiers: LCCN 2018028465 (print) | LCCN 2018038313 (ebook) | ISBN EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 12/13/2018 9:49 AM via TEXAS STATE UNIV AN: 1892651 ; Rodriguez, Cristobal, Martinez, Melissa A., Valle, Fernando.; Latino Educational Leadership : Serving Latino Communities and Preparing Latina/o Leaders Across the P-20 Pipeline Account: s8329666 2 Copyright © 2018. Information Age Publishing. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. 9781641133579 (Ebook) | ISBN 9781641133562 (harcover) | ISBN 9781641133555 (pbk.) Subjects: LCSH: Hispanic American educators. | Educational leadership--United States. | Hispanic Americans--Education. Classification: LCC LC2669 (ebook) | LCC LC2669 .L366 2018 (print) | DDC 371.829/68073--dc23 LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2018028465 Contents Foreword vii Gerardo R. López 1. Evolving Latino Educational Leadership: For Latino Communities and Latinx Leaders Across the P–20 Pipeline 1 Cristóbal Rodríguez, Melissa A. Martinez, and Fernando Valle 2. Voices of Texas Latina School Leaders 25 Irma L. Almager, Sylvia Méndez-Morse, and Elizabeth Murakami 3. Making a Difference: Evidence from the Field 39 Juan Manuel Niño Encarnación Garza, Jr, and Mariela A. Rodríguez 4. Latino Superintendent Leadership: A Case of Texas District Leaders 57 Juan Manuel Niño 5. Educational Leadership Development: Moving from a Deficit Model to an Ecologically Strengths Based Model for Latinxs 77 Anthony S. Marín, Merranda Romero Marín, and Luis Vázquez 6. Moving toward a Reconceptualization of Latina/o Leadership in Higher Education: Testimonio on Meritocracy, Mobility, and Calluses on Our Hands 97 Magdalena Martínez and Edith Fernández 7. The Will to Finish: An Examination of Successes for Latinas in Educational Administration Doctoral EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 12/13/2018 9:49 AM via TEXAS STATE UNIV AN: 1892651 ; Rodriguez, Cristobal, Martinez, Melissa A., Valle, Fernando.; Latino Educational Leadership : Serving Latino Communities and Preparing Latina/o Leaders Across the P-20 Pipeline Account: s8329666 3 Copyright © 2018. Information Age Publishing. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. Programs 121 Rose A. Santos 8. Promotoras y Politicas in the University: Developing Culturally Responsive Higher Education Leaders to Serve Latinx Communities 135 Josie Carmona, Vanessa A. Sansone, Leslie D. Gonzales, and Anne-Marie Núñez 9. A Testimonio Rooted in the Community: Three Pedagogical Approaches to Develop Equity-Minded Educational Leaders for and with the Latina/o/x Community 159 Louie F. Rodríguez 10. Advocacy in Practice: Factors that Influence Latinx School Leaders’ Advocacy for Increasing Educational Access for Latinx Students and Families 179 Kendra Lowery and Silvia Romero-Johnson 11. The GO East LA Initiative: Creating a Pipeline for Latino Leadership 201 Bianca L. Guzmán, Claudia Kouyoumdjian, Miguel Dueñas, Monica Garcia, and Jasmine A. Medrano 12. Afterword 221 Mónica Byrne-Jiménez v vi • CONTENTS EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 12/13/2018 9:49 AM via TEXAS STATE UNIV AN: 1892651 ; Rodriguez, Cristobal, Martinez, Melissa A., Valle, Fernando.; Latino Educational Leadership : Serving Latino Communities and Preparing Latina/o Leaders Across the P-20 Pipeline Account: s8329666 4 Copyright © 2018. Information Age Publishing. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. Acknowledgements Foremost, we would like to thank everyone that has contributed to this work directly, especially the contributing authors as this compilation of works makes Latino Educational Leadership even more meaningful and powerful. We want to also personally thank our students, like Kofi LeNiles who have helped us along the way. Secondly, we want to thank the numerous colleagues and mentors that have shown us numerous paths and support during this process; our academic familia. Rebeca Burciaga was key in supporting this concept at one point and getting the support of the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education as a Commissioned Work, which then turned into our original article publication in the Journal of Hispanic Higher Education, so mil gracias to Rebeca and Loui Olivas. Other organizations were also helpful in the very beginning when the conversation began about Latino Educational Leadership, such as the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities through the help of Emily Calderon Galdeano. Additional opportunities to expand our understanding of Latino Educational Leadership as a collaborative effort were made possible through conference presentations at The University Council for Educational Administration and the Association for the Study of Higher Education. These academic spaces provided us, as editors, a means of solidifying the conceptualization of this book. We also extend a great big thank you to George Johnson and Lisa Brown at Information Age Publishing, who saw us through from beginning to end of this project. We appreciate their feedback and patience, as we know working with three editors and a handful of contributors is not an easy feat. Finally, above all others we would like to acknowledge and thank our families, partners, children, parents, and siblings, as much of our work is done with their love, support, and their sacrifice in some way and it is also done in their name. Their foundational support, coupled with the spiritual guidance from our ancestors, our faith, and our love for our communities and commitment to social justice helped make this book a reality. Damos gracias. EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 12/13/2018 9:49 AM via TEXAS STATE UNIV AN: 1892651 ; Rodriguez, Cristobal, Martinez, Melissa A., Valle, Fernando.; Latino Educational Leadership : Serving Latino Communities and Preparing Latina/o Leaders Across the P-20 Pipeline Account: s8329666 5 Copyright © 2018. Information Age Publishing. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. Foreword Gerardo R. López When Donald J. Trump, announced his candidacy for president on June 16, 2015, he launched his campaign with explicit promises to crack down on immigration, regain economic prosperity, reclaim military dominance, and return the United States to its presumed position as the global economic leader of the free world. To be certain, within three minutes of his kick off speech, after a lengthy processional to Neil Young’s Keep on Rocking in the Free World, Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric was on full display. He not only blasted China, Japan, Latin America, and the Middle East as economic and societal “threats” to US interests, but he specifically singled out Mexico as a primary culprit in destroying the American social fabric: When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best…They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people. (Trump, 2015) He then followed up these statements on the campaign trail, utilizing racially laced rhetoric that likened Mexican immigrants to “killers,” “thugs,” and “bad hombres” (Miller, 2015), while building widespread support among his political base in support of a wall along the US/Mexico border. As his presidential campaign progressed, Trump’s anti-Mexican rhetoric only escalated: targeting a federal judge, a popular Mexican news anchor, and even the Mexican spouse of one of his political opponents (Smith, 2015). In effect, Donald Trump not only ran for president on an explicitly anti-Latinx platform, but effectively secured his nomination by appealing to anti-immigrant sentiment via politically charged dog-whistles and nativist appeals. Since the election of Donald Trump, we have witnessed an uptick in hate crimes, blatant discrimination, verbal attacks, on-line vitriol, and pro-Nazi/nativist sentiment that has largely targeted the undocumented, people of Mexican origin, women, Muslims, and LGBT communities. The Southern Poverty Law Center (2016) was the first to recognize and call attention to this troubling trend. Several months into his presidency, we have seen how how the president continues to stoke anti-Latinx sentiments on a daily basis not only via his Twitter feed, but though tangible policies and practices that have resulted in increased funding for border security, increases in immigration/ICE raids, and the strategic dismantling of Deferred Action/DACA protections for undocumented students. Adding insult to injury, Trump also pardoned Sherriff Joe Arpaio—a racist law official whose anti-immigrant bullying and blatant disregard for the rule of law in a racial profiling case earned him a criminal conviction (Liptak, Diaz, & Tatum, 2017). This latter act, in itself, left us with little doubt that Trump’s immigration policy agenda is not only anti-Mexican, but anti-Latinx at its core. Given the current state of affairs, it is critical that we take seriously the call for Latinx leadership at this juncture in our nation’s history—not only to preserve, defend, and fight for social justice in our communities, but to cultivate the next generation of activists, leaders, scholars, teachers, artists, dreamers, and advocates who will continue to push against destructive ideologies that threaten our very existence. Let there be little doubt about the necessity and importance of this undertaking: while Latinx leadership is desperately needed, it is not for the faint of heart. It requires the courage to speak truth to power, the willingness to stand with (and for) communities, the savvy to build alliances that build and strengthen neighborhoods and families, the audacity to confront destructive policies and practices that threaten to destabilize and disrupt communities, as well as a keen ability to engage in critical self-reflection and praxis. The collection of essays in this book is a valiant “first attempt” to gather insights into this terrain with a specific emphasis on Latinx educational leadership across the PK-20 educational pipeline. Toward this end, each of the authors brings a unique epistemological perspective and methodological approach to this work—often relying on a range of standpoint positionalities, culturally-grounded methodologies, theoretical frameworks, and ontological perspectives to describe, identify, and highlight the terrain of Latinx educational leadership. As readers engage this text, they should pay careful attention to how these authors describe what EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 12/13/2018 9:49 AM via TEXAS STATE UNIV AN: 1892651 ; Rodriguez, Cristobal, Martinez, Melissa A., Valle, Fernando.; Latino Educational Leadership : Serving Latino Communities and Preparing Latina/o Leaders Across the P-20 Pipeline Account: s8329666 6 Copyright © 2018. Information Age Publishing. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. Latinx leadership looks like—or perhaps what it should look like—in service of Latinx communities in contemporary times. As most chapter authors rightly point out: it is not enough for school leaders to be culturally-attuned or linguistically adept. Rather, school leaders must also be deeply committed to social justice, advocacy, community empowerment, and social transformation if they are to make a dent in improving the lives of Latinx youth and communities in this country. Given Trump’s rampant and unapologetic anti-immigrant agenda, coupled with his refusal to outwardly condemn the extreme hate groups such as the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazis following the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia (Shear & Haberman, 2017), the time for critical, bold, and courageous Latinx leadership is now. Our communities are literally under attack; we cannot afford to wait until the next administration, or rely on our elected officials across the political aisle to make things better for our communities. We can—we must—actively resist the rampant anti-Latinx sentiment that is rapidly taking hold in this country, and create spaces of possibility and hope for future generations. Our survival and our future depends on it. References Liktak, K., Diaz, D., & Tatum, S. (August 27, 2017). Trump pardons former Sheriff Joe Arpaio. CNN News. Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/25/politics/sheriff-joe-arpaio-donald-trump-pardon/index.html Miller, J. (July 2, 2015). Donald Trump defends calling Mexican immigrants “rapists.” CBS News. Retrieved from https://www.cbsnews.com/news/election-2016-donald-trump-defends-calling-mexican-immigrants-rapists/ Shear, M. D., & Haberman, M. (August, 15, 2017). Trump defends initial remarks on Charlottesville; again blames ‘both sides.’ New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/15/us/politics/trump-press-conference-charlottesville.html?mcubz=0&_r =0 Smith, C. (July 6, 2015). Donald Trump deletes Tweet about Jeb Bush’s wife. ABC News. Retrieved from http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/donald-trump-deletes-tweet-jeb-bushs-wife/story?id=32256986 Southern Poverty Law Center. (2016). Over 200 incidents of hateful harassment and intimidation since election day. Retrieved from https://www.splcenter.org/hatewatch/2016/11/11/over-200-incidents-hateful-harassment-andintimidation -election-day Trump, D. (July 16, 2015). Presidential campaign announcement speech. C-SPAN. Retrieved from https:/ /www.youtube.com/watch?v=apjNfkysjbM EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) - printed on 12/13/2018 9:49 AM via TEXAS STATE UNIV AN: 1892651 ; Rodriguez, Cristobal, Martinez, Melissa A., Valle, Fernando.; Latino Educational Leadership : Serving Latino Communities and Preparing Latina/o Leaders Across the P-20 Pipeline Account: s8329666 7 Copyright © 2018. Information Age Publishing. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under U.S. or applicable copyright law. Chapter 1 Evolving Latino Educational Leadership For Latino Communities and Latinx Leaders Across the P–20 Pipeline Cristóbal Rodríguez, Melissa A. Martinez, and Fernando Valle In our 2016 article in the Journal of Hispanic Higher Education (JHHE) we argued for the need to frame the wealth of Latino Educational Leadership across the P–20 educational pipeline. That article served as the foundation for this edited book; becoming a real-life manifestation of our vision and what we hope will spark continued action and deeper conversations on this critical concept and practice. We urge scholars, practitioners, and policy makers to consider what Latino educational leadership might look like, how it can be defined, harnessed, and theorized to better inform our work in both meeting the needs of our Latinx students and communities and the work to prepare, mentor, and graduate more Latinx leaders in school and university settings across the country. In this introductory chapter, we revisit the main points originally offered in the JHHE article; contextualizing previous arguments within our current political and social climate of 2018. During the last two years, we have witnessed an increasing number of school shootings, as well as increased threats, remarks, and violent incidents based on racist, homophobic, misogynistic, and xenophobic ideology in schools and on university campuses. With many documented cases of Latino students, faculty, and leaders experiencing some of this firsthand. The 45th President has fueled a divisive climate, often using deficit oriented and marginalizing language to describe diverse communities, as when he described immigrants as “animals” and Mexicans as “drug dealers, criminals, and rapists.” Under the current Presidential administration, there have also been numerous health, education, and immigration related policy changes that have particularly impacted Latino students and Latino communities. The most recent termination of temporary protected status for Honduran immigrants, and the continued attempts to dismantle DACA fall in this category. Such issues have prompted many schools and universities to develop support systems and resources to attend to increased anxiety and fear among Latinx students, especially those whose families or are themselves facing potential deportation. At the same time, there have been remarkable signs of solidarity across racial/ethnic, economic, and political lines in an effort to address the divisive and violent behaviors and sentiments that have made their way into our schools. In many cases, Latinx students and leaders are at the helm or taking part. A number of Latinx students, for instance, have become national leaders and activists for gun control. This was the case for Emma Gonzalez, Alfonso Calderon, and Lorenzo Prado after the deadly shooting at their high school in Parkland, Florida (Kaleem & Agrawal, 2018). We have also seen continued efforts to mobilize within our local communities, in school districts and universities, with social media playing a key role in this process. It is with this current context in mind that we revisit our plea for considering the critical nature of Latino Educational Leadership. We conclude the chapter by discussing the organization of the book. In moving forward with this work, as editors, we also feel it important to provide an ex ...
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Running head: LATINO EDUCATION LEADERSHIP

Latino Education Leadership
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LATINO EDUCATION LEADERSHIP
Latino Education Leadership
According to various researches and studies, the Latino community is the fastest-growing
underserved demographic in the US. This is as a result of lack of well-equipped educational leaders
to provide excellent and equitable education. This is evident in the academic results as most young
Latino learners on average, perform poorly compared to their peers. Therefore, this chapter on the
Latino Educational Leadership is giving incredible insights how to help minority groups and more
than it that advocates and acknowledges the preparation and support that is required for the Latino
community and the Latinx educational leaders in the education and policy pipeline (Garcia etl,
2017). Needless to say, the chapter focuses on Latino education across the...

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