Nutrition assignment help

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Hello, I need help with these 2 nutrition assignments.  Please have original and accurate work.  Full sentences for each question.

Also, please write answers in the documents provided.

Thank you.

chapters7_8activity2.docx
chapters7_8activity1.docx

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Chapters 7 & 8 Activity 2: Intake Analysis—Minerals Eating Plan A (1 Day’s Intake) 1 cup of Corn Flakes cereal 1 cup of 1% fat milk 2 cups of coffee 2 slices of whole-wheat bread 2 ounces thinly sliced baked ham 2 ounces cheddar jalapeño cheese 8 ounces chocolate milk 3 12-ounce beers 2 beef and cheese enchiladas Eating Plan F (1 Day’s Intake) 2 scrambled eggs 1 cup whole milk 2 slices bacon 2 1-ounce Slim Jims 6 ounces lean ground beef 2 ounces provolone cheese ¼ cup blue cheese dressing 12 ounces water 2 ounces cheddar cheese cubes 6 ounces grilled chicken breasts 1 scrambled egg 1 cup lettuce ½ cup blue cheese dressing 2 ounces pork rinds 12 ounces water Eating Plan B (1 Day’s Intake) 6 ounces grapefruit juice 2 scrambled eggs 1 ounce cheddar cheese 20 ounces coffee 2 ounces soy milk 1 cup fresh raspberries 1 cup cantaloupe 1 honey oat granola bar 1 cup vanilla yogurt 6 ounces grilled salmon 10 cooked asparagus spears 1 cup broccoli 4 ounces white wine 4 ounces blueberry juice + seltzer water 20 barbecue flavor soy crisps 1 cup wasabi peas 1 3” x 3” spanakopita 1 cup spinach 1 /3 cup feta cheese ¼ cup black olives 5 grape tomatoes 3 Tbsp. oil & vinegar dressing 6 ounces white wine ¼ cup mixed nuts 1 cup vanilla ice cream Eating Plan G (1 Day’s Intake) 1 cup honey dew melon 1 cup fresh strawberries 1 large apple ½ avocado ½ cup sweet green peppers ½ cup sweet red peppers ¼ cup black olives 1 medium orange 1 medium banana 1 cup boiled green beans 10 cooked asparagus spears 1 cup sautéed mushrooms 1 cup kidney beans ¼ cup dried apricots ¼ cup dried Craisins 5 dried, pitted dates Eating Plan D (1 Day’s Intake) 1 cup of Corn Flakes cereal ¾ cup 1% fat milk 6 ounces orange juice 12 ounces coffee 1 honey nut granola bar 6 ounces chocolate milk 2 slices rye bread 2 ounces pastrami 2 Tbsp. hot mustard 1 ounce Swiss cheese 1 cup 2% fat milk 1 large apple 8 Ritz crackers 2 Tbsp. peanut butter 12 ounces Diet Coke 1 cup angel hair pasta ¾ cup marinara sauce 1 cup lettuce & 1 sliced tomato 1 /3 cup shredded cheddar cheese 5 cucumber slices ¼ cup Italian dressing 1/6 of a devil’s food cake 6 ounces red wine Look at Eating Plans B, F, and G: 1. a. Which of these diets supplies the most water for the body? b. What are the major water sources in this meal plan? 2. a. Which of the eating plans could be modified to increase the water content? b. What food or drink choices would be included to increase the water content of the particular eating plan? Look at Eating Plans A, B, and D: 3. a. Which of these eating plans supplies enough potassium? b. Enough magnesium? c. Why are these 2 minerals important for the health of the body? 4. Suggest ways to reduce the sodium content of each of these eating plans. Look at Eating Plan G: 5. a. Is there enough iron in this eating plan? b. How could this eating plan be modified to increase the iron but maintain the mission of this eating plan? Chapters 7 & 8 Activity 1: Comparing Supplements Label To Label Instructions: Obtain the labels of 2 multi-nutrient supplements. Compare these 2 different multivitamin preparations for their contributions of each vitamin and mineral to the percent of Daily Values. • • • You can look at brand-name supplements as compared to similar generic supplements. Or, you can compare a specialty formula (men’s/women’s formula, stress formula, dieter’s formula, etc.) with a general multivitamin. Fill in the following table and answer the questions to help you compare different multivitamins. Supplements you compared: Vitamin/Mineral #1 _________________________ #2 _________________________ Amount Listed Supp. #1 Supp. #2 % Daily Value Supp. #1 Supp. #2 Vitamin A Riboflavin Thiamin Niacin Folate Vitamin B6 Vitamin B12 Vitamin C Vitamin D Vitamin E Vitamin K Calcium Phosphorous Sodium Potassium Magnesium Chromium Cooper Selenium Zinc Supplements can safely provide 100% of the Daily Values for most vitamins and minerals. UL Answer these questions for supplement #1: 1. What is the name of the supplement? 2. What is the cost per pill? 3. Is the supplement complete (does it contain all vitamins and minerals with established DRIs)? If no, what is missing? 4. Are most vitamins and minerals present at or near 100% of the DRIs? Exceptions include biotin, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus, which are rarely found in amounts near 100% of the DRI. List any vitamins or minerals that are present in low amounts or dangerously high amounts. 5. Does the supplement contain unnecessary nutrients or nonnutrients? If yes, list them. 6. Is there “hype” on the label? Does the label use the terms “natural,” “organic,” “chelated,” “no sugar,” “stress-reliever,” etc.? List any terms used. Answer these questions for supplement #2: 7. What is the name of the supplement? 8. What is the cost per pill? 9. Is the supplement complete (does it contain all vitamins and minerals with established RDIs)? If no, what is missing? 10. Are most vitamins and minerals present at or near 100% of the DRIs? Exceptions include biotin, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus, which are rarely found in amounts near 100% of the DRIs. List any vitamins or minerals that are present in low amounts or dangerously high amounts. 11. Does the supplement contain unnecessary nutrients or nonnutrients? If yes, list them. 12. Is there “hype” on the label? Does the label use the terms “natural,” “organic,” “chelated,” “no sugar,” “stress-reliever,” etc.? List any terms used. Special Notes: • Vitamin A should come from beta-carotene with only about 3,000 IU coming from retinal (active vitamin A). • Older adults may need higher amounts of vitamin D than a multivitamin can provide. They may have to eat additional foods with vitamin D or consult their healthcare provider about taking additional vitamin D supplements. • Post-menopausal women and men do not need the 100% daily value for iron. • Doses of manganese (trace mineral) should not exceed 11 mg daily. Excessive doses can cause Parkinson’s-like symptoms. • Doses of zinc above 40 mg/day can interfere with copper absorption. Copper is needed for red blood cell formation in addition to iron. • Try to get vitamin E in the form of mixed tocopherols instead of just alpha-tocopherol. Ask Yourself: 13. 14. When would a specialty formula be necessary? Is a brand name vitamin always superior to a generic version? References: Why I Take Supplements. Dr. Andrew Weil’s Self Healing. Premiere Issue, pages 1,6-7. Does Your Supplement Provide a Nutrient Overdose? Tuft’s University Health and Nutrition Letter. Volume 19 (2), April 2001, page 4. Forman, Adrienne. Multis Deliver Nutrition Insurance: EN Helps You Make the Best Choice. Environmental Nutrition. Volume 27 (6) June 2004, pages 1, 4-5.
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