Science
California State University - Fullerton Lesson Plan About Hydrosphere

California State University - Fullerton

Question Description

I’m trying to learn for my Geology class and I’m stuck. Can you help?

I need to design a lesson plan about hydrosphere that includes an instructor handout, student handout, and a set of picture or video. Attached are the instructions and the required documents. Please follow the steps and no plagiarism.

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SCI301 Assignment Guidelines: Design a demo SCI301: Design a Demo Now that you have done demos, it’s time to try designing one. This is similar to designing a lesson plan in that it is aligned to learning outcomes and includes what the instructor and students should do in the classroom. At the end of the semester, I will provide you with a copy of all of the student-created demos for you to download and bring into your future classroom. Assignment: There is one design your own demo assignment per unit (see list below), which will be listed in the week's tasks and turned in by clicking on the assignment names on the “> Demos” page on Blackboard. New demo assignments will appear with the release of each unit. You will be responsible for designing three demos: Demo Geosphere Hydrosphere Atmosphere    Due Sun, 6/19, by midnight Sun, 6/26, by midnight Thurs, 7/21, by midnight These demos can be on any topic in the unit that interests you; if you can’t figure out what to do, use Google to find other demos that can serve as models for your own (make sure to cite your sources) or ask Dr. Karam for help with ideas. Just like a good testbank question has a clear focus, your demo should focus on one Earth science concept. Your demo must clearly involve active participation by students if it were done in a classroom (obviously, you don’t need to involve students for this class). You will be designing a demo that includes the following components: (1) An instructor handout modeled after the provided template (see pages 3-4) (2) A student handout that includes at least one higher-order thinking question (3) A video/set of pictures showing the demo in action The instructor handout should frame your demo within the context of an Earth science course – this means describing why the demo is relevant, what the demo will demonstrate, and how someone could lead the demo for a class. This will take thoughtful reflection. Follow the example to include these sections: a) Focus question(s) & objectives e) Safety concerns b) Misconceptions f) Target grade level & modifications c) Materials g) Citations for sources d) Procedure h) Key to student handout The student handout should be inquiry-based, providing an opportunity for students to think critically and make decisions. This can include basic information or instructions for the demo as well, but must include at least one higher-level thinking question – in general, this type of question should have multiple valid approaches or solutions to the problem. Your instructor handout will include a key to the student handout with correct/acceptable answers. The video or set of pictures should show how the demo looks/works. Grading rubric: SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 1/4 SCI301 Assignment Guidelines: Design a demo Category Content relevance (5 pts) Indicators ☐Demo introduces a concept directly to the Earth sphere of interest ☐Objective is appropriate and explicitly articulated ☐Demo contains appropriate activities to reach objectives ☐Demo delivers accurate science content using proper terminology Student ☐Student handout provided engagement ☐Student handout includes open-ended, higher-order thinking questions (5 pts) ☐Demo asks questions, rather than simply showing or telling ☐Reaching demo objective depends on student participation Instructor ☐Handout follows template and includes all relevant sections in sufficient detail handout for another instructor to use them in the classroom (5 pts) ☐Focus question and objectives are keyed to CA learning outcomes & course concepts ☐ Handout is clear, organized, and uses proper grammar/syntax Documentation ☐Video or set of pictures that shows demo being done is included (note: this (5 pts) does not need to include students – just what the instructor would do) ☐Presentation follows instructor handout ☐Presentation is clear, organized, and uses proper grammar/syntax ☐All components of demo are visible/audible Example instructor handouts: click links below to view (1) Seasons (week 1) (2) Crayon Rock Cycle (week 4) SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 2/4 SCI301 Assignment Guidelines: Design a demo Template for instructor handout: click here to open a downloadable copy of the template TITLE Your name (a) Focus question(s) & objectives Focus question(s): Questions Objectives: Students who demonstrate understanding can… (1) Objectives Alignment to CSET test guide sections: (http://www.ctcexams.nesinc.com/PDF/CSET_Prep/CS_122subtestdescription.pdf) Question Alignment to California’s Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): (http://www.cde.ca.gov/pd/ca/sc/ngssstandards.asp) Look at Grade 6 Earth Science in particular (b) Misconceptions http://undsci.berkeley.edu/teaching/misconceptions.php http://assessment.aaas.org/topics/ (under Earth Science heading) This activity directly addresses several common misconceptions about TOPIC: 1. Misconceptions (c) Materials Materials & # of each needed (d) Procedure Describe background material to be presented, questions to the class to frame the demo, procedure for the demo, followup questions/activities (e) Safety concerns List any safety concerns and how to mitigate them SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 3/4 SCI301 Assignment Guidelines: Design a demo (f) Target grade level & modifications Target grade level: Grades Modifications for grades #: Short description of modifications for older or younger students (g) Citations for sources Cite any sources you used in a standard citation format (h) Key to student handout Provide copy of student handout with answers SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 4/4 SCI301 Demo: Instructor Guide Template TITLE Your name (a) Focus question(s) & objectives Focus question(s): Questions Objectives: Students who demonstrate understanding can… (1) Objectives Alignment to CSET test guide sections: (http://www.ctcexams.nesinc.com/PDF/CSET_Prep/CS_122subtestdescription.pdf) Question Alignment to California’s Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): (http://www.cde.ca.gov/pd/ca/sc/ngssstandards.asp) Look at Grade 6 Earth Science in particular (b) Misconceptions http://undsci.berkeley.edu/teaching/misconceptions.php http://assessment.aaas.org/topics/ (under Earth Science heading) This activity directly addresses several common misconceptions about TOPIC: 1. Misconceptions (c) Materials Materials & # of each needed (d) Procedure Describe background material to be presented, questions to the class to frame the demo, procedure for the demo, followup questions/activities (e) Safety concerns List any safety concerns and how to mitigate them SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 1/2 SCI301 Demo: Instructor Guide Template (f) Target grade level & modifications Target grade level: Grades Modifications for grades #: Short description of modifications for older or younger students (g) Citations for sources Cite any sources you used in a standard citation format (h) Key to student handout Provide copy of student handout with answers SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 2/2 SCI301 Demo (Geosphere, Week 4): Crayon rock cycle instructor guide Crayon Rock Cycle Example instructor guide (a) Focus question(s) & objectives Focus question(s): What are the three types of rocks? How can one type of rock become another? Objectives: Students who demonstrate understanding can… (1) Identify what kind of rock will form under different processes (2) Identify coloration patterns in the three types of rocks Alignment to CSET test guide sections: (http://www.ctcexams.nesinc.com/PDF/CSET_Prep/CS_122subtestdescription.pdf) 1.1 Question Formulation a. Formulate and evaluate a viable hypothesis b. Recognize the iterative nature of questioning 1.5 Drawing Conclusions and Communicating Explanations a. Draw appropriate and logical conclusions from data SMR 4.1 Rock Cycle a. Compare and contrast the properties of rocks based on physical and chemical conditions in which rocks are formed, including plate tectonic processes Alignment to California’s Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): (http://www.cde.ca.gov/pd/ca/sc/ngssstandards.asp) Grade 6 Earth Science: MS-ESS2-1: Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process. (b) Misconceptions http://undsci.berkeley.edu/teaching/misconceptions.php http://assessment.aaas.org/topics/ (under Earth Science heading) This activity directly addresses a common misconception: 1. The rock cycle only moves in one direction (c) Materials For each student: 1. Three (3) 4- x 4-inch squares of aluminum foil 2. At least three (3) different color crayons 3. Bowl of very warm water (~115°F; most water heaters are set to ~120°F so the hottest tap water should do it) 4. Bowl with ice (if you want to solidify crayons faster) 5. A coin/knife to shave the crayons 6. A hammer/something heavy to pound the crayons SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 1/3 SCI301 Demo (Geosphere, Week 4): Crayon rock cycle instructor guide (d) Procedure 1. Introduce rock cycle by probing students prior knowledge: a. What are the three basic types of rocks? (Label diagram on student handout) b. Why base rock classification on underlying physical processes instead of chemical composition? (Hint: what is dominant chemical in all rocks?; can physical structure change with no change in chemistry?) 2. Introduce the three main things in the activity: shaving, pounding, and melting crayons 3. Have students form hypotheses and write them in the table on the student handout: a. Hypothesize about what the crayons will look like after doing these 3 things b. Hypothesize about which of the 3 activities represents which formation process 4. Have students do the activity in whatever order they want (ask: why is this possible?): a. Shaving crayons: i. Shave crayons using a penny/knife onto foil square ii. Close foil square and squeeze it iii. Open foil and observe crayon “rock” – what happened to the colors? b. Pounding crayons: i. Put crayons (or crayon fragments) into foil square and close it ii. Pound on it with a hammer or heavy object at least 10 times iii. Open foil and observe crayon “rock” – what happened to the colors? c. Melting crayons: i. Put crayons (or crayon fragments) into foil square and close it ii. Place into the warm water for at least 1 minute (it should get squishy) 1. If it’s not getting squishy, add warmer water iii. Wait a few minutes or place into cold water to solidify rock iv. Open foil and observe crayon “rock” – what happened to the colors? 5. Have students observe variety of crayon rocks, asking: a. What do they all have in common? b. What’s different depending on the process used? c. Which process corresponds with igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic? d. Were your hypotheses supported? 6. Clean up! a. Crayons can be used again (although probably weird colors) b. All materials can be thrown in trash (e) Safety concerns Crayons can be hard to shave for kids – instructor may need to assist/pre-shave crayons. Warm water may be harmful to kids – be careful water is not too hot to avoid burns or have one hot water bowl under the instructor’s control. (f) Target grade level & modifications Target grade level: Grades 4-6 Modifications for grades K-3: Safety controls above, lead whole class through activity one step at a time instead of self-paced SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 2/3 SCI301 Demo (Geosphere, Week 4): Crayon rock cycle instructor guide (g) Citations for sources Stotz. n.d. The Rock Cycle: A Web Quest. Carlton Hills, Santee, CA. Web. < http://www.santeesd.net/Page/5827> (h) Key to student handout The Rock Cycle 1. Label the rock cycle processes in the diagram below: 2. Develop hypotheses about what the crayons will look like after doing the three crayon activities and about which rock cycle process each activity represents: Hypotheses What will the crayons look like? Shaving crayons Lots of little pieces of colors stuck together Pounding crayons Melting crayons Variable sizes of One color, likely brown different colors flattened (a mix of all colors) in one direction What rock cycle process does this represent? Sedimentary compaction and sedimentation Metamorphic heat and pressure Igneous melting to magma and solidifying 3. Were your hypotheses proven, supported, or falsified? How do you know? Supported – what I observed matched hypotheses (not match = falsify), but I can’t be 100% sure (no “proof”) SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 3/3 SCI301 Demo (Exosphere, Week 1): Seasons Instructor Guide AN EXOSPHERE APPLICATION OF THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD Sarah Karam (a) Focus question & objectives Focus questions: How do scientists actually use the scientific method? What causes seasonal temperature changes? Objectives: Students who demonstrate understanding can… (1) Apply the scientific method to investigate potential causes of Earth’s seasonal changes in temperature (2) Use patterns to identify possible cause-and-effect relationships (3) Describe some of the strengths and limitations of the scientific method Alignment to CSET test guide sections: (http://www.ctcexams.nesinc.com/PDF/CSET_Prep/CS_122subtestdescription.pdf) Question Formulation (1.1) Formulate and evaluate a viable hypothesis Recognize the value and role of observation prior to question formulation Recognize the iterative nature of questioning Given an experimental design, identify possible hypotheses that it may test Data analysis/graphing (1.4) Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop qualitative and quantitative statements about relationships between variables Energy in the Earth system (CS 118 SMR 2.4) Explain daily and seasonal changes in the sky (i.e., the sun's position and the intensity and duration of sunlight) Alignment to California’s Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): (http://www.cde.ca.gov/pd/ca/sc/ngssstandards.asp) Grade 6 Earth Science Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons (MS-ESS1-1) Scientists and engineers are guided by habits of mind such as intellectual honesty, tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, and openness to new ideas (MS-LS1-3) Patterns can be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships (MS-ESS1-1) Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table) (MS-ESS1-3; RST.6-8.7) (b) Misconceptions This activity directly addresses several common misconceptions about the scientific method: 1. There is a single scientific method that all scientists follow (UCMB 2014) http://undsci.berkeley.edu/teaching/misconceptions.php#b3 SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 1/8 SCI301 Demo (Exosphere, Week 1): Seasons Instructor Guide 2. Experiments are a necessary component of science (UCMB 2014) http://undsci.berkeley.edu/teaching/misconceptions.php#b5 3. The job of a scientist is to find support for a particular hypothesis (UCMB 2014) http://undsci.berkeley.edu/teaching/misconceptions.php#b14 This activity directly addresses several common misconceptions about why Earth’s temperature changes seasonally: 1. Summer is warmer because Earth is closer to the Sun (RUC 2008) http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/pass/passv14/Seasons_EarthSunDist.pdf 2. Summer is warmer because more solar energy reaches Earth (AAAS 2014) (http://assessment.aaas.org/topics/CL#/,tabs-317/2 http://assessment.aaas.org/topics/CL#/,tabs-317/2,tabs-322/2,tabs-327/2 3. The orientation of Earth’s axis changes as it moves around the Sun (AAAS 2014) http://assessment.aaas.org/topics/CL#/,tabs-317/2,tabs-322/2 http://assessment.aaas.org/topics/CL#/,tabs-317/2,tabs-322/2,tabs-327/2,tabs-326/2 (c) Materials Needed for each student: Student handouts (printed single-sided for ease of use) Pencil or pen Development of materials: An activity based on observing and analyzing data must be built on accurate and complete data. Average monthly temperatures for Irvine, CA, were compiled from PRISM 30-year (1981-2010) monthly average normals data (PRISM 2013). Solar irradiance data were compiled by calculating maximum monthly value from 10 years (2004-2013) daily data from the Total Irradiance Monitor launched by NASA (Kopp 2014). Distance to the sun data were compiled as the distance from Earth to Sun on the 4th day of the month as calculated by the Landsat 7 satellite (Irish 2000). Declination was calculated for the 4th day of each month using the NOAA Solar Calculator (ESRL 2014). (d) Procedure 1. Activate prior knowledge about the scientific method (hypothetico-deductive approach) a. b. Ask: Who uses the scientific method? Ask: What is its goal/purpose? 2. Lead students through an example of an application of the scientific method a. For each of the following prompts, ask what students would do next and draw parallels to the scientific method. Have students fill in the 1st diagram of the handout and suggest that they write in the examples next to the steps. i. “You walk by the cafeteria and it smells like tomatoes and cheese and bread. What do you think they’re cooking?” [Observations/Make a hypothesis] ii. “What could you do to figure out if you’re correct? Go there and see.” [Test hypothesis] SCI301-OL, Summer 2016 Karam Page 2/8 SCI301 Demo (Exosphere, Week 1): Seasons Instructor Guide iii. “You go in and see that they are making tomato soup and grilled cheese. What do you do?” [Analyze results/Make conclusions] iv. “You go back and tell your classmates.” [Share results] 3. Lead students to understand the two key components of the scientific method – observations and hypotheses – and how they are complementary. a. b. c. Ask: What could go wrong if you only made observations? Ask: What could go wrong if you only made hypotheses? Ask: Does testing mean it has to be an experiment? 4. Activate prior knowledge about the seasons [Observations] a. b. Ask: What are the different seasons? Write sequence on the board. Ask: What is the weather/temperature/daylight like in different seasons? Prompt for similarities and differences and write on the board. 5. Build background knowledge about the Earth-Sun system using a model/pictures a. b. c. d. Radiation (irradiance) from the Sun is the energy input that warms Earth. Earth travels along an elliptical orbit around the Sun. Earth rotates on an axis that is tilted. The direction of the tilt never changes, but the declination (angle of the Sun to the Earth) changes as the Earth rotates and orbits. 6. Introduce the hands-on activity a. b. c. Ask: What do you think causes the difference in temperature with the seasons? [Make hypotheses] Guide students to develop hypotheses regarding: declination, distance from Earth to Sun (orbit), amount of solar irradiance, and whatever else. Write a list on the board. i. If students prompt tilt as a hypothesis, ask how they would know it can’t be tilt based on the background knowledge? ii. Guide students towards the 3 listed above as the focus of our investigation. Divide students into small groups (3-4 students). Show students the dataset and ask them how the activity follows the scientific method. 7. Student groups work through the activity on the worksheet a. Predictions: If , then . 8. Summarize with a whole-class discussion a. b. Planet Nerth has a smaller tilt than Earth. Would that make seasonal temperatures more or less different? Why? Planet Zerth is closer to the Sun than Earth. Would that make seasonal temperatures more or less different? Why? (e) Safety concerns N/A (f) Target grade level & modifications Target grade level: Grades 6-8 Modifications for grades 9-12: Students develop their own possible causes for seasonal chang ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Demo Lesson Plan on
Teacher

Insert your names

Grade Level

10th

Objective

Students to be able to understand the meaning of sea level and the effects of its changes

Standard(s)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.D
Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the
facts about sea level.

Vocabulary/
Academic Language

Using right vocabulary

Pre-made Materials

10 copies of impressionist paintings.
10 copies of thought prompts worksheet.

Subject

Hydrosphere (Sea Level)

Date

October 7th 2019

# of Students

20

Pre-made posters with objective, subject, grade, my name, a square,
and class rules.
Anticipated Student Misunderstandings
Confusing sea level with sea depth
*Differentiation Strategies, Grouping of Students, IEP Requirements, etc.

Planning for Students w/ Disabilities
Have students answer the thought
prompts orally.
LESSON PLAN
Do Now / Prior Knowledge
Time Allotted

1 minute

Grouping of Students
Sitting independently.
Desired Student Interactions
Active Listening and Tracking Speakers
Questions to Ask

Planning for ELL Students

Planning for Fast Finishers

Prepare a list of adjectives that may
help students describe their sea levels.
Teacher Will
“Hi! My name is (insert
your name here).. Today
I’m going to teach you the
meaning of sea level and
the impact of its changes
to the environment.
However before we start,
let’s check at these rules
that will enable us make

Ask students to go back and answer more
of the thought prompt questi...

Merdav (1864)
Boston College

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