Writing
University Writing Center How a Computerized Sewing Machine Works Paper

University Writing Center

Question Description

I’m studying for my Engineering class and don’t understand how to answer this. Can you help me study?


For Section Six you will record yourself delivering an oral presentation that clearly explains a technical object, material, issue, or concept directly related to your field of study. Keep in mind that you are explaining a technical topic to a general audience: careful audience analysis is critical.

Requirements:

  • The presentation must be delivered extemporaneously (see page 506 in Riordan for a discussion on extemporaneous speaking). An outline is recommended but not required.
  • You are not expected to be an expert presenter; you are expected to present in a polished, organized, well-planned manner.

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Outlining a Presentation Some people prepare two different outlines when they give a formal speech: a preparation outline and a speaking outline. The preparation outline is a complete outline of the content of the speech; composing it will help you develop your ideas and ensure that your speech is persuasive and logical. The speaking outline, in contrast, is a highly condensed outline specifically designed to remind you of your main points as you give your presentation. Writing a Preparation Outline Your preparation outline should include a summary sentence for every main point, supporting point, sub‐supporting point, and transition in your speech. Be sure to write in complete sentences. Using complete sentences is helpful if someone, perhaps your instructor or a classmate, will be reviewing your speech before you present. In addition, writing your preparation outline in full sentences can help you see where you need to flesh out your ideas. You don’t, however, have to write out every word you intend to say; just offer a summary of the basic idea you plan to get across for every main point, supporting point, sub‐supporting point, and transition in your speech. Sample Preparation Outline Here’s a common format for a preparation outline. While it won’t be appropriate for every situation or audience, it works for many kinds of presentations. Use it as a starting point and make adjustments as needed. SPECIFIC PURPOSE: To inform/to persuade/to commemorate, etc. CENTRAL IDEA: TITLE: INTRODUCTION I. II. III. IV. IIV. Attention‐getter: Central Idea: Establish credibility and relate topic to audience: Preview the main points: Transition: BODY I. Main Point: (A declarative sentence about the first main idea for your topic) A. Supporting point: 1. Sub‐supporting point: 2. Sub‐supporting point: B. Supporting point: 1. Sub‐supporting point: 2. Sub‐supporting point: C. Supporting point: (If needed) 1. Sub‐supporting point 2. Sub‐supporting point Transition: II. Main Point: (A declarative sentence about the second main idea for your topic) A. Supporting point: 1. Sub‐supporting point: 2. Sub‐supporting point: B. Supporting point: 1. Sub‐supporting point: 2. Sub‐supporting point: C. Supporting point: (If needed) 1. Sub‐supporting point: 2. Sub‐supporting point: Transition: III. Main Point: (A declarative sentence about the third idea about your topic, if needed) A. Supporting point: 1. Sub‐supporting point: 2. Sub‐supporting point: B. Supporting point: 1. Sub‐supporting point: 2. Sub‐supporting point: C. Supporting point: (If needed) 1. Sub‐supporting point: 2. Sub‐supporting point: Transition: CONCLUSION I. Summary of the main points: II. Restatement of the central idea: III. Closing lines that relate back to the introduction: BIBLIOGRAPHY List all of your sources using the documentation style (e.g., MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.) indicated by your instructor. References Lucas, S.E. (2008). The Art of Public Speaking (10th ed.). McGraw‐Hill: New York. Street, N.J. (2009). Packet for Public Speaking: Comm. 203, Spring 2009. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution‐ NonCommercial‐NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. You may reproduce it for non‐commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute The University Writing Center, Texas A&M University. ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Running head: SPEECH ON HOW A COMPUTERIZED SEWING MACHINE WORKS

Speech on How a Computerized Sewing Machine Works
Name
Institution Affiliation

SPEECH ON HOW A COMPUTERIZED SEWING MACHINE WORKS

2

Speech on How a Computerized Sewing Machine Works
According to Musco and Shaffer (2001), sixty-five percent of sewing machine users
utilize computerized sewing machines. Notably, many people and organizations have shifted
from mechanical sewing machines to computerized sewing machines since they were introduced.
Even though some high-end mechanical sewing machines have various options of stitches and
buttonholes, the resultant stitching are less precise compared to the one from the computerized
sewing machine. Usually, computerized sewing machines allow users to program unique and
decorative stitches coupled with incredible embroidery. Equally, they are complex and
sop...

DR_MarcusE (18047)
University of Virginia

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