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NUR3894CBE Rasmussen College Contemporary Healthcare Issues Homework

NUR3894CBE Contemporary Issues in Nursing

Question Description

I need support with this Nursing question so I can learn better.

Scenario

You are a nursing case manager within your local community. Frequently, contemporary healthcare issues emerge that not all nurses know how to handle. You evaluate the current issues and decide to write a monthly newsletter to improve nurses’ responses to these issues.

Instructions

Create a newsletter focusing on the following:

  1. Outline four contemporary healthcare issues present within your local community.
  2. Discuss how each contemporary issue affects nursing practice.
    1. Describe how an understanding of these issues lead to effective responses.
    2. Identify a professional resource to support nursing practice for each contemporary issue presented.
  3. Scrutinize resolution strategies for each contemporary issue identified.
    1. Explain how a nurse advocate would support each strategy.

Resources

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NUR3894CBE Contemporary Issues in Nursing Deliverable 6 Nursing Newsletter Contemporary Trends Impacts on Nursing. In this rapidly changing environment, nurses must have a solid educational background and advanced skills as well as a broader contemporary knowledge base to navigate in today’s healthcare infrastructure. Holland (2018) said it best, “Agile nurses who are able to pivot their skills to flow with new developments, whether those are new electronic medical records systems or alternative care settings, will be the most successful” (p. 8). Therefore, this lesson will examine a few contemporary trends and issues in healthcare that affect nursing practice. A Changing Healthcare Landscape Today, with our evolving healthcare infrastructure and unstable healthcare reform, nurses are left to create a service delivery design to meet the challenges facing hospitals of the future (McClelland, 2017). Healthcare reform is changing the way healthcare services are delivered and financed, which greatly impacts how nurses provide care to clients. Furthermore, projections show that by 2030 more than 70 million Americans will be over the age of 65 (McClelland, 2017). What is unique about this set of healthcare consumers is they are choosing to receive home-based care over hospital services. Therefore, this is affecting nursing practice as many traditional nursing hospital roles are now playing out in community-based nursing roles. Rather than bedside care on a medical-surgical unit, many nurses are finding themselves in the patients’ home fully integrating into their patients’ care. Nurses are a huge part of leading this healthcare change and will continue playing a pivotal role in leading and developing client care plans with a communitybased focus (McClelland, 2017). In addition to community-based care, many additional factors continue to be driving forces changing the healthcare landscape and greatly impacting nursing practice to include: National policy, regulatory requirements, benchmark standards, economic forces, technology and innovation, a resource-constrained healthcare delivery system, and cultural and social challenges. Innovation and Technological Advances Today, clients are plagued with rising healthcare costs and less reimbursement for services posing risk to accessing essential services. Therefore, innovation is playing a key role in providing affordable services to clients in the comfort of their own homes. Telehealth and telemedicine have grown in popularity and continues to be a driving factor in accessibility of healthcare services regardless of key demographic factors. In addition, technology is advancing client care while also driving down costs. One example of a technology that can significantly drive down costs is three-dimensional printing devices. Three-dimensional printing provides customized medical technology tailored to meet the needs of individual patients but disrupts the cost implications of current medical procedures as the technology is costefficient when compared to traditional approaches. For example, according to the National Foundation of Transplants, a typical kidney transplant costs over 300,000 dollars. A three-dimensional kidney would cost around 10,000 dollars (Hippen, Ross and Sade, 2009). Reference Hippen, B., Ross, L. F., & Sade, R. M. (2009). Saving lives is more important than abstract moral concerns: financial incentives should be used to increase organ donation. The Annals of thoracic surgery, 88(4), 1053-61. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2009.06.087 Holland, C. (2015). Higher learning. Investing in our nursing workforce. Nursing Management, 46(9), 810. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.NUMA.0000470775.02484.c0 McClelland, M. (2017). Nurse led reform: Is it time to rethink the nursing unit? Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 22(2), 9. http://ezproxy.rasmussen.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/lo gin.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=128687778&site=eds-live Generation In Nursing As nurses it is important we are appraised of the latest contemporary trends and issues in healthcare affecting nursing practice. Let’s take a look at a couple currently trending in nursing. Intergenerational Nursing Workforce The nursing workforce is currently comprised of five generations (Mokoka, 2016). This generational span is looked to as a contemporary trend that impacts healthcare, and nursing practice alike. Each of these “generations are defined not only by a span of birth years, but by shared events and circumstances that shaped attitudes, values, expectations, and motivations” (Caple and Karakashian, 2018, p. 1). Therefore, as healthcare employees they present with a wide range of needs posing the necessity for a very diverse and flexible healthcare environment. The issue of retaining the current diverse workforce of nurses is further compounded by the fact that the current nursing shortage is estimated to peak by 2050 by 250,000 nurses (Caple and Karakashian, 2018). According to Mokoko (2016) the current nursing workforce is comprised of 75% of baby boomers and 20% are generation Y, or those under the age of 30. This alone presents a scarce gap as 5% of the current workforce is between the ages of 30 and 60. When the baby boomer generation retires there will be a severe gap of experienced nurses to fill in for this generation which has shown to be the most productive of generations (Mokoko, 2016). The future workforce gap also has significant financial ramifications according to Caple and Karakashian (2018) that project the loss of turnover could be as high as “$300,000 USD, and as high as $82,000 for each highly specialized nurse who retires or resigns. A 14% turnover rate can potentially lead to a $4.4 million cost to a 300-bed Hospital” (p. 2). Opioid Epidemic It is estimated that almost 100 lives are lost every day in American to opioid overdose (Pinot and Kornusky, 2018). According to Seth, Scholl, Rudd, and Bacon (2018) “opioids were implicated in 66.4% of the 63,632 drug overdose deaths that occurred in the U.S. in 2016” (p. 350). These statistics are shocking, frightening, and have a direct impact on the nursing profession for a multitude of reasons. First, nurses have easy access to prescription opioids which places them at a higher risk for misuse. In combination of stressful roles, long hours and easy access to opioids, nurses are amongst the prevalent populations known to abuse prescription opioids. According to Schub (2018), “researchers reported a total of 404 drug-related deaths between 2003-2013, with females making up two-thirds of the deceased, and nurses making up the highest number of cases at 62.8%” (p. 1). Second, the nursing profession is impacted by the opioid epidemic as it effects how we treat acute and chronic pain. Statistics, such as those reported by Pinto and Kornusky (2018) found “of 1,015,116 opioid-naïve patients undergoing surgery, researchers found that each refill of prescribed opioids was associated with a 44% increase in risk of opioid misuse and each additional week of opioid use was associated with a 20% increase in risk of opioid misuse” greatly impact how healthcare has approached pain management (p. 1). References Caple, C. R. B. M., & Karakashian, A. R. B. (2018). Nursing workforce: Intergenerational -- Leading and managing. CINAHL Nursing Guide. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.rasmussen.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.co m/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nup&AN=T903032&site=eds-live Mokoka, E. (2016). Managing a multigenerational nursing workforce to strengthen staff retention. Professional Nursing Today, 19(4), 42-45. Pinto, S. M., & Kornusky, J. R. M. (2018). Substance abuse: Prescription drugs -- Opioids. CINAHL Nursing Guide. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.rasmussen.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.co m/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nup&AN=T701578&site=eds-live Schub, T. B., & March, P. P. (2018). Substance abuse in healthcare professionals. CINAHL Nursing Guide. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.rasmussen.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.co m/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nup&AN=T701415&site=eds-live Seth, P., Scholl, L., Rudd, R. A., & Bacon, S. (2018). Overdose deaths involving opioids, cocaine, and psychostimulants — United States, 2015– 2016. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 67(12), 349-358. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6712a1 Nurses Advocating for Changes Nurses have long stood as advocates on healthcare issues affecting patients, the nursing profession, and the healthcare system. Being a nurse advocate is an integral role to the nursing profession and influences others to take action causing a catapult effect forward. Advocacy has been defined as “seeing a need and finding a way to address it…An advocate builds support for a cause” (The ABCs of effective advocacy, 2016, p. 7). There are simple steps that provide a roadmap to successful advocacy to include: We all know how critical it is that nurses advocate for the future of the profession but let’s take a look at examples of how nurses can and have been advocating in healthcare. A Changing Healthcare Landscape Although the changing healthcare landscape is out of nurses’ control, they can still have opportunities to lead within this hostile and uncertain healthcare landscape. As nurses we can look at ways to enhance our patient’s health outcomes when their access to care may change, as well as their affordability of care. Ensuring our patients are exposed to the multitude of ways healthcare can help them realize their best health is a critical advocacy role nurse’s play in the changing landscape. For example, ensuring rural and remote patients who have affordability and accessibility issues are setup for telehealth and community health services is a vital nurse advocacy role in ensuring patients can continue to promote optimal health regardless of the healthcare reform (Hall-Long, 2010). In analyzing the role of the nurse we have to look at the collaborative nature that drives the heart of advocacy. As advocates, it is important that nurses are utilizing professional organizations to support their advocacy initiatives. For example, the Institute of Healthcare Improvements has created an organizing framework, called Triple Aim. Triple aim combines the issues of better health, better care, and lower cost to support consumers regardless of the healthcare infrastructure (Institute for Healthcare Improvement, 2018). Utilizing tools from professional organizations will further leverage the nurses’ role as an advocate on a national level. For example, a nurse could use the Triple Aim framework to advocate for community resources and help people access resources and benefits that sometimes they don’t take advantage of, such as supplemental food programs, community clinics, and home health services. Nurses will have a vital advocacy role in safeguarding the health of the nation even in a hostile healthcare landscape. References Indiana State Nurses Association. (2016). The ABCs of effective advocacy: Attention, bipartisanship, & collaboration. ISNA Bulletin, 42(2), 7–14. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.rasmussen.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.co m/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=115227357&site=eds-live Hall-Long, B. (2010). Nurse matters: Assuming your role in advocacy. Home Healthcare Nurse, 28(5), 309–316. https://doiorg.ezproxy.rasmussen.edu/10.1097/NHH.0b013e3181dc30f7 Institute for Healthcare Improvement. (2018). Initiatives. Retrieved from http://www.ihi.org/Engage/Initiatives/TripleAim/Pages/default.aspx Schub, T. B., & Strayer, D. R. M. (2018). Power of nurses to advocate for policy change. CINAHL Nursing Guide. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.rasmussen.edu/login? Nurses Advocating Examples Rich examples of nurses advocating in healthcare can be seen anywhere in the nursing profession. Let’s analyze the nurse advocacy role in creating resolution strategies for current issues in healthcare. Innovation and Technological Advances Examining the nurse advocacy role in creating resolution strategies for current innovation issues in healthcare is complex. Nursing’s advocacy role in supporting innovation focuses on driving down healthcare costs, improving client outcomes and enhancing use of technological tools to drive nursing care. Specifically, nurses are seen advocating for technology advances by supporting innovation in health care delivery as a strategy for pushing the affordability curve (Lee & Yoon, 2017). Nurses can be seen today as the vehicle for supporting innovation that not only enhances efficiency but also ensures quality in health care delivery. With the uncertain healthcare landscape on the horizon, nurse’s advocacy role will need to continue its intense effort to support innovation that helps bend the affordability curve while ensuring quality healthcare outcomes are met (Lee & Yoon, 2017). One current issue in healthcare today is looking at ways to improve the data quality of electronic health records (Lee & Yoon, 2017). For example, Lee and Yoon (2017), found that “in the nephrology area, although chronic kidney disease is one of the hottest area of research, its codes are not assigned in many of administration claim databases; most cases of acute kidney injury not requiring dialysis therapy are not coded in claim databases” (p. 4). Therefore, this issue needs to be fixed as a growing area of healthcare isn’t being captured in our electronic health records which cannot capture nephrology client outcome and may be missing wasted resources in healthcare. When nurses have pointed out this discrepancy as a client advocate, processes are being created to support initiatives within this specialty practice (Lee & Yoon, 2017). Intergenerational Nursing Workforce The nurse advocacy role in creating resolution strategies to support the intergenerational nursing workforce will become even more critical as we approach the largest nursing shortage in history. Examining generation‐ specific retention strategies to support each generation uniquely has been credited as one way to work through the four groups of working nurses (Cabral, Hanson, & Reilly, 2016). This idea is supported by Caple and Karakashian (2018) who found that “by considering generational differences in needs and expectations, nurse managers can reduce intergenerational conflict and create a positive work environment that supports each employee, increases job satisfaction, and promotes employee retention” (p. 2). As nurse advocates we need to be knowledgeable on all the generations making up our nursing culture as they greatly impact how we collaborate to meet the demands of healthcare. Observing and fully understanding other generations, as well as our own allows the profession to embrace each other’s differences and highlight each generation’s strengths so we can balance the various generational cultures (Mokoka, 2016). All nurses need to be advocating for generational cohesion to support our current culture but to also ensure a cohesive future as we delve into a major workforce shortage. The key strategy is to become knowledgeable on the various generations and determine approaches and strategies to support each generation uniquely and utilize their unique strengths to leverage the current healthcare challenges. If nurses are not knowledgeable they cannot effectively advocate for the needs of the nursing profession and support a cohesive nursing culture. References Cabral, R. A., Hanson, D., & Reilly, M. D. (2016). Leading and retaining a multigenerational nursing workforce. Leadership Grounded in Caring Science. International Journal for Human Caring, 20(2), 9395. https://doi.org/10.20467/1091-5710-20.2.93 Caple, C. R. B. M., & Karakashian, A. R. B. (2018). Nursing workforce: Intergenerational -- Leading and managing. CINAHL Nursing Guide. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.rasmussen.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.co m/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nup&AN=T903032&site=eds-live Mokoka, E. (2016). Managing a multigenerational nursing workforce to strengthen staff retention. Professional Nurse Today, 19(4), 42-45. (GI) Lee, C. H., & Yoon, H. J. (2017). Medical big data: promise and challenges. Kidney research and clinical practice, 36(1), 3-11. doi.org/10.23876/j.krcp.2017.36.1.3 ...
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Final Answer

Attached.

Nursing Newsletter: Contemporary Healthcare Issues - Outline
I.
II.

Increased Innovative Technologies
Need for Cultural Competence

III.

Integration of Alternative Medicine

IV.

Changes in Scope of Practice

V.

Resolution Strategies with Nurses as Advocates of Change


Nursing Newsletter: Contemporary Healthcare Issues - Outline
I.
II.

Increased Innovative Technologies
Need for Cultural Competence

III.

Integration of Alternative Medicine

IV.

Changes in Scope of Practice

V.

Resolution Strategies with Nurses as Advocates of Change


Running head: NURSING NEWSLETTER

1

Nursing Newsletter: Contemporary Healthcare Issues
Name
Institution

NURSING NEWSLETTER

2

Nursing Newsletter: Contemporary Healthcare Issues
The healthcare environment is evolving with the diverse needs of the patient population.
The contemporary issues continue to influence how nurses are affected in the care of patients.
The changes in regulations in different states have increased the roles of nurses in society. The
recommendation of the IOM report requires better involvement of nurses in the design of
treatment methods for patients and advocacy for care. The main contemporary issues in the
healthcare environment include innovation, cultural competence, alternative medicine and
increasing scope of practice. These factors have shaped how nurses are involved in the
healthcare environment leading to new expectations and competencies in handling patient care.
Increased Innovative Technologies
The healthcare environment has led to increased changes in how nursing practice is
carried out. A key change has been in the area of innovation where augmented technologies have
increased the operations. The advent of electronic health records has improved how nurses help
patients by ensuring proper documentation of their history and medication (Kaya, Turan &
Aydın, 2016). These changes have led to better patient outcomes that entail reduced waiting
times, proper triaging and client follow-up. Innovation has advanced the use of evidence-based
practices in ensuring that nurses can provide the best care to the patients. For instance, in
preventing patient falls among the elderly in the hospital, nurses are using bedside alarms that
page them when a patient moves. These devices have improved patient care and created better
job satisfaction for the nurses.
Nurses are expected to understand emerging technologies and propose ways in which
they can be incorporated into patient care. Holland (2018) noted the need for agile nurses who

NURSING NEWSLETTER

3

can quickly adapt to new developments and help even in alternative care settings. The increase of
in-home care settings requires the use of remote technologies to monitor patients and track their
progress. Additionally, the invention of telemedicine provides new avenues of care where nurses
can reach patients through outreach programs that promote healthy living and screening of
diseases based on symptoms (Kaya, Turan & Aydın, 2016).
Need for Cultural Competence
Another contemporary issue that is influencing nursing practice is cultural competence.
The healthcare population continues to be multicultural, which requires increased competencies
among nurses to ensure better patient outcomes. The different cultural, religious, and traditional
beliefs have an impact on care (Kaihlanen, Hietapakka & Heponiemi, 2019). Therefore, nurses
are continually required to improve their cultural knowledge so as to help the diverse patients.
For instance, immunizations are viewed differently by the Jews who do not believe in
conventional medicine. The Japanese and Chinese may also be included to use other
complementary methods of healing. Therefore, a nurse should be competent enough to
accommodate the views of the patients.
Cultural competence can be acquired through reference to literature that richly co...

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