Course: English 3, English homework help

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I need someone who is really good at regualr higshchool level englsih and can getme a 100 on all the assingments in the file....the answers must be complete and when you write a paragraph... it MUST BE 5-7 SENTENCES LONG. That is a requirement....also....no plagerism allowed.

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1ST ASSIGNMENT- Writing 5C Below is a chart which shows the continuum from Pessimistic to Optimistic and on which you can "gauge" where a character fits at each point in the story. For each of the stories, "The Trout" and "The Wager," decide where you think each story's main character is at the beginning, the middle and the end of the story. After you decide, put a quote in the appropriate box to support your "optimism gauge." I have done the first box for you as an example. This assignment is worth 25 points – 5 points for each box completed. "The Wager" Extreme Moderate Moderate Extreme Optimism Optimism Neutral Pessimism Pessimism One of the guests, a jurist, a young man of twenty-five years of age, replied: To live under any conditions is better than not to live at all.” Beginning Middle End "The Trout" Extreme Moderate Moderate Extreme Optimism Optimism Neutral Pessimism Beginning Middle Pessimism End 2ND- Writing 4 Essay Using a Symbol In this writing assignment, you will incorporate a symbol into a piece of writing. Create a symbol and write a short essay on what the symbol means. This should be a piece of short fiction using the symbol as the central focus in the essay or a poem either using the symbol as a focus or describing the symbol's meaning. Your essay or short fiction should be from five to seven paragraphs long or the poem should be from twelve to sixteen lines. Be sure you have:    Created a symbol that is appropriate for what it is symbolizing Expanded the idea of the symbol so that you show many facets of it (A mockingbird in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird was used because it was helpless and vulnerable and only brought joy and good feelings to people – a symbol of the situation of African American man, Tom Robinson living in a Southern town during the 1930's and 40's). Have a beginning, a middle and an end of in your short fiction—include exposition, rising action, climax, falling action and resolution. Your writing will be graded using the NWREL 6+1 rubric. This assignment is worth 70 points. THIS PART WILL HELP YOU WITH THE ASSINGEMNTS THAT ARE UNDERNEATH IT: Since we have been reading literature exploring many different cultures in this course, you are going to set out on an adventure that will take you thousands of miles and many centuries away. You will explore the rich history, fairy-tale settings and legendary people that have contributed knowledge, courage, and insight into the world as we know it in the 21st century! Using your finding, you will write a short story using what you have learned in the Short Story unit about what makes a good short story. Since you need good, accurate details to weave into your story, your assignment is to research a location, time period, and famous person to include in your story. You must include all three elements in your story. To make it easier, some of the preliminary research has been done for you. You may choose any of the options below for your location, time period and famous person. (Of course you know not to mix and match the people, time periods and locations! If you choose Erik the Red, then you must also use Norway and the 10th century!) Famous Person Erik the Red (Viking) Catherine the Great (Empress of Russia) Napoleon Bonaparte (Emperor) Location Time Period Norway (later Greenland) 10th century Russia 18th century France Late 18th century and early 19thcentury Elizabeth I (Queen of England) England 16th century After you gather as much information as you can, be sure you adhere to the following criteria for your story:        Your story must contain dialogue You must carefully include all the elements of a short story: setting, point of view, plot, characterization and theme. Remember that the way you say something is just as important as what you say. In other words, use imagery and figurative language (metaphors, similes, allusions, personification, etc.) and specific words to describe character, setting, etc. Be sure you describe your setting in detail. Use your research to make the reader see, hear, feel, and smell the place. Use your research of the time period to lend the richness of societal life to your story. How did people make a living? What did they eat and how did they prepare their food? What was family life like? What did they do for entertainment? Use your research about your famous person to make him/her really com ALIVE! Use yourMethods of Characterization chart to help describe what your character is like. What does he look like physically? What kind of clothes does he wear? How does he treat other people? What are his goals? What do others say about him? What does he think about the era in which he lives? Include two graphics with your story. These graphics may be: charts, tables, or diagrams that illustrate some facts about your character’s influence. Or the graphics can be pictures, drawings, or photographs. These can be either actual images of your character or something having to do with your character, or they can be images you create (drawings, photos, paintings, etc) that illustrate the story. If you have chosen an image that may be unclear to your reader (i.e., the proposed landing place in Greenland by Erik the Red), then include a short description of the image’s importance. 3RD- Research 3A: Narrowing your topic For this story, you will need several basic elements as listed below. Deciding on these elements will help you narrow the focus of the story. Protagonist: The character in the short story with whom the reader4 identifies – the "hero" or "heroine." In your case, the protagonist will be the character you chose from the chart in the Introduction. He or she is the person we want to "win" in the story's conflict. If written from a first-person point of view, it is often the protagonist who tells the story. Antagonist: The antagonist is the problem the protagonist faces in the story. It may be a goal to accomplish, a situation that must be overcome, or a personal psychological difficulty; however, in your story it may be another person. Conflict: This is the "battle" waged between the protagonist and the antagonist. It is what gives a story a plot, what causes things to happen. Each episode of a story is a stage in the conflict between the protagonist and the antagonist. Resolution: This is the point in a story when the reader discovers whether the protagonist or the antagonist will be victorious in their conflict. It marked the end to the conflict and signals the end to a story. To narrow your scope, fill in a chart using the one below as a guide. You may add more circles if you need them for more complications or explanation. Click here to download a copy of this guide in rich text format. This assignment is worth 25 points. 4th- Research 3C - Working Bibliography Now that you have at least finished the initial stages of research, submit a working bibliography listing AT LEAST three sources for CHARACTER, three sources for TIME PERIOD, and three sources for LOCATION. Although you may not use all of these sources or you may find more sources you like better, this will give you enough sources to glean an appropriate amount of information from to begin your story. Each source should be written in APA format as you would see it on your Works Cited page. Three points per source will be taken off for every source not written in the appropriate format. This assignment is worth 45 points – 5 points for each source written in APA format. Below is the format for the most common kinds of sources: An article in a periodical (e.g. a journal, newspaper or magazine) Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year, add month and day of publication for daily, weekly, or monthly publications). Title of article. Title of periodical, volume number, pages. A non-periodical (e.g., book, report, brochure, or audiovisual media) Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle. Location: Publisher. NOTE: For "Location," you should always list the city, but you should also include the state if the city is unfamiliar or if the city could be confused with one in another state. Part of a non-periodical (e.g., a book chapter or an article in a collection) Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Year of publication). Title of chapter. In A. Editor & B. Editor (Eds.), Title of book (pages of chapter). Location: Publisher. NOTE: When you list the pages of the chapter or essay in parentheses after the book title, use "pp." before the numbers: (pp. 1-21). This abbreviation, however, does not appear before the page numbers in periodical references. Article in an Internet Periodical Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of journal, volume number (issue if available). Retrieved month day, year, from http://Web address. EXAMPLE: Kawasaki, J. L., & Raven, M.R. (1995). Computer-administered surveys in extension. Journal of Extension, 33, 252-255. Retrieved June 2, 1999, from http://joe.org/joe/index.html Non-periodical Internet Document (e.g., a Web page or report) Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Retrieved month date, year, from http://Web address. NOTE: When an Internet document is more than one Web page, provide a URL that links to the home page or entry page for the document. Also, if there isn't a date available for the document use (n.d.) for no date. EXAMPLE: University of California, San Francisco, Institute for Health and Aging. (1996, November). Chronic care in America: A 21st century challenge. Retrieved September 9, 2000, from the Robert Wood Foundation Web site: http://www.rwjf.org/library/chrcare Part of Non-periodical Internet Document Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. In Title of book or larger document (chapter or section number). Retrieved from http://Web address. EXAMPLE: Schneiderman, R. A. (1997). Librarians can make sense of the Net. San Antonio Business Journal, 11, 58+. Retrieved January 27, 1999, from EBSCO Masterfile database. Edited Book, No Author Duncan, G.J., & Brooks-Gunn, J. (Eds.). (1997). Consequences of growing up poor. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. Basic Format for Books Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle. Location: Publisher. 5th- Writing 3D - Paraphrasing Now let's see how you do! Paraphrase the passage below remembering to put it in your own words and choose major points to paraphrase. Original Passage Henry VIII's foreign affairs were as turbulent as his domestic ones. At the beginning of his reign, England was firmly allied with Spain due to Henry's marriage to the Spanish princess, Catherine of Aragon, the daughter of Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand who funded Christopher Columbus on his search for the New World. At the time of Henry's marriage, England was a Catholic country but after Henry rejected Catherine to marry Anne Boleyn, Henry changed the national religion of England to Protestantism in order to divorce Catherine. Henry's England also had a long history of hostility with France. "Magnificent, liberal, and a great enemy of the French," wrote the Venetian ambassador of Henry on his coronation day. Henry hoped to re-take lands across the English Channel that France had taken from England. He waged two wars against France for this purpose. Although Henry held many grand meetings with the French King, Francis I, one observer noted, "These sovereigns hate each other very cordially." This assignment is worth 20 points. Fill in each of the boxes below with information about your short story using from three to five sentences for each box. Click here to download a copy of this chart in rich text format. Describe the appearance of your protagonist Describe the appearance of your antagonist Describe your protagonist's personality Describe your antagonist's personality Describe the setting in which your story will take place AN EMPTY CHART FOR YOU TO ANSWER THE QUESTION IN IS BENEATH: Describe the appearance of your protagonist Describe the appearance of your antagonist Describe your protagonist’s personality Describe your antagonist’s personality Describe the setting in which your story will take place Research 5 - Final Short Story Now that you have all the tools, take that "big leap" and produce the masterpiece you know you can write! Be imaginative and think outside the box. HAPPY CREATING! Using the location, time period, and famous person you selected in Section 1, write a short story which includes all three elements. As a reminder, the criteria for your story specified in Section 1 included the following:       Your story must contain dialogue. You must carefully include all the elements of a short story: setting, point of view, plot, characterization and theme. The way you say something is just as important as what you say. Use imagery and figurative language (metaphors, similes, allusions, personification, etc.) and specific words to describe character, setting, etc. Describe your setting in detail. Use your research to make the reader see, hear, feel, and smell the place. Use your research of the time period to lend the richness of societal life to your story. How did people make a living? What did they eat and how did they prepare their food? What was family life like? What did they do for entertainment? Use your research about your famous person to make him/her really come ALIVE! Use your Methods of Characterization chart to help describe what your character is like. What does he/she look like physically? What kind of clothes does he/she wear? How does he/she treat other people? What are his/her goals? What do others say about him/her? What does he/she think about the era in which he/she lives? This culminating assignment is worth a total of 100 points. The rubric that will be used to grade your short story is as follows:       The beginning of the story is appealing and "hooks" the reader. 10 points The story creates suspense or humor. 10 points The setting is appropriate to the story and fully developed enough to move the plot along. 20 points The dialogue gives insight into the characters and seems natural. 20 points The differences between the protagonist and the antagonist show the conflict and each character (or in the case of the antagonist, each element, e.g. a storm or animal) is fully developed.20 points The conflict is resolved in a manner consistent with the plot and the characters created (or if the conflict is not resolved, that, in itself, could be a resolution if the lack of a resolution has been foreshadowed in the story). 20 points Writing 2A-2 Read again the sections above from "Kubla Khan" and find between four and six pictures that will make a collage of the image Coleridge has created for you in the poem. You will be graded on how closely you have read the poem and therefore how specific your pictures are to Coleridge's images. Also, be aware of how you position your pictures. There is a progression in the poem. Try and replicate (follow) that progression. The more closely you read, the more detail you will be able to show in your collage. THIS IS FROM THE SECTIONS OF KUBLA KHAN: Kubla Khan In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills, Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree; And here were forests ancient as the hills, Enfolding sunny spots of greenery. . . . . A mighty fountain momently was forced: Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail, Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher's flail And 'mid these dancing rocks at once and ever It flung up momently the sacred river. Five miles meandering with a mazy motion Through wood and dale the sacred river ran, Then reached the caverns measureless to man, And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean: And 'mid this tumult Kubla heard from far Coleridge is describing here some sort of palace along which a river ran down to the sea. Within the walls and towers of the palace were beautiful gardens and fragrant trees. Perhaps Coleridge meant for the “stately pleasure-dome” to be one's imagination and, if it is not contained in some way, it will "run down to a sunless sea." Coleridge suggests here that sometimes imagination can be so intense it frightens and upsets us. He uses the image of an eruption to represent this explosion of imagination. A fountain exploded out of the river and flung rocks and water up in the air. Then the river is followed down "through wood and dale" until it reaches the "caverns measureless to man" where it disappears into the ocean. Amid all the sounds associated with the fountain and the rushing river, Kubla Ancestral voices prophesying war! . . . . hears a prophesy! Notice how Coleridge appeals to sight ("the shadow of the dome of pleasure") and sound The shadow of the dome of ("where was heard the mingled pleasure measure from the fountain and Floated midway on the waves; Where was heard the mingled the caves"). Notice also the measure contrast between the "sunny From the fountain and the caves. pleasure-dome" and the "caves It was a miracle of rare device, of ice." A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice! THIS SHOULD HELP IN ANSWERING THE ASSINGMENT UNDERNEATH: Presentation Narrative: Section 3 Part B Slide 1: The Cain and Abel Motif in “An Enemy of the People” Slide 2: The central conflict in the play centers on the clash between Peter Stockmann and his younger brother, Dr. Thomas Stockman. In the Old Testament of the Bible (Genesis 4:1-16), Cain—the first-born son of Adam and Eve—murders his younger brother, Abel. Cain, a farmer, was envious of Abel, a shepherd, because God had accepted Abel’s offering over Cain’s. Motifs pitting one family member against another continued to appear in literature down through the ages. Slide 3: In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Claudius kills his brother, the king, in order to succeed him as king and marry his wife. Slide 4: In Sophocles’s Oedipus at Colonus, and the Greek myth on which it is based, brothers— Polynices and Eteocles—vie for the kingship of Thebes and kill each other. Even as early as Act I in the play, there is a hint of jealousy from Peter toward his brother. Hovstad. Yes, Thomas is really indefatigable when it is a question of the Baths. Peter Stockmann. Well remember, he is the Medical Officer to the Baths. Hovstad. Yes, and what is more, they owe their existence to him. Peter Stockmann. To him? Indeed! It is true I have heard from time to time that some people are of that opinion. At the same time I must say I imagined that I took a modest part in the enterprise. Slide 5: Another major theme is shiny apples are sometimes rotten at the core. The baths appear safe, but poison befouls their waters. In the same manner, the town’s leading citizens are outwardly attractive but inwardly repulsive. Slide 6: Listen to the arrogance and muted dislike Peter feels toward his brother in this speech. Without outwardly saying anything terribly negative, his dialogue implies that there is no love lost between the brothers. Hovstad. But who denies it, Mr. Stockmann? You set the thing going and made a practical concern of it; we all know that. I only meant that the idea of it came first from the doctor. Peter Stockmann. Oh, ideas yes! My brother has had plenty of them in his time--unfortunately. But when it is a question of putting an idea into practical shape, you have to apply to a man of different mettle, Mr. Hovstad. And I certainly should have thought that in this house at least... ...
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Tutor Answer

Alaika
School: University of Virginia

This is the far i have come am hoping to complete before the given time.

1ST ASSIGNMENT- Writing 5C
Below is a chart which shows the continuum from Pessimistic to Optimistic and on which you can "gauge"
where a character fits at each point in the story.
For each of the stories, "The Trout" and "The Wager," decide where you think each story's main character
is at the beginning, the middle and the end of the story. After you decide, put a quote in the appropriate
box to support your "optimism gauge." I have done the first box for you as an example. This
assignment is worth 25 points – 5 points for each box completed.
"The Wager"

Extreme

Moderate

Moderate

Extreme

Optimism

Optimism

Neutral
Pessimism

The banker
asked a question
to them; as to
which
executioner was
Beginning more human, he
that killed in few
minutes or he
who drags you in
the course of
many years? .

Middle

End

During the first
year of
confinement the
prisoner suffered
severely form
loneliness and
depression. And
at times could be
heard crying

The old banker

Pessimism

A lively
discussion arose
Their host the
and the young
One of the
banker had
man made bet
One of the
guests, a jurist, a
started the
bids with the
guests observed young man of
conversation by
banker and on
that that Both
twenty-five years
saying that;
reaching an
are equally
of age,
Capital
agreement the
immoral for they replied: To live
punishment kills
young man
have the same
under any
a man at once
exclaimed:
object to take
conditions is
but lifelong
“Agreed, You
life.
better than not to
imprisonment
stake your
live at all.”
kills him slowly.
millions and I
stake my
freedom”

The sounds of
the piano could
be heard
continuously
during the day
and at night.

He then had an

The young man
however,
refused wine and
tobacco claiming
that the wine
excites desires
dreaded by any
prisoner and that
tobacco spoilt
the air of his
room.

During the tenth
year he wrote to
the banker
During the sixth
referring to him
year he began
as “my jailer” he
studying books
made a requesdt
and in the span
that his papers
of four years six
be read of him
hundred
and other
volumes upon
qualified people
his request had
of which two
been procured
shots were done
for him.
in his honor to
his mastery of
these subjects.
Upon reading it

Early the

on the eve to the
day to release
the young man
by now 40years
of age had a sad
monologue with
himself ruing his
diminishing
estate, his
miserable future
at the hands of
young man.

idea to kill the
man before he
gained his
freedom the next
day. Upon
getting access to
room he saw the
frail stature of
the man in his
stillness had
found sleep
seated at the
table not moving
as if dead. He
thought that this
would be the
best time to
murder the man
and retain his
wealth.

he saw the
detailed reasons
While ideas were that the prisoner
flying in his head has expressed
on how to
during his “jail
terminate the life term” and to
of the prisoner, which the
he saw a letter
prisoner equated
drafted on the
to vanity. He
table.
wrote of how he
had arranged to
break the bet
and let the
banker retain his
money.
Somehow this
changed the
resolve of the
banker who
being touched
and emotional
kissed the man
and left for his
bed.

following day,
the man was
awoken by the
shouts of his
watchman who
had seen the
seen the
prisoner escape
through the
window. In
confirming this
he went into the
room trying to
make it obvious
that he was
there yesterday.
He collected the
letter and
returning to the
main house
locked it away
into a safe place.

"The Trout"
Extreme

Moderate

Moderate

Extreme

Optimism

Optimism

Neutral
Pessimism

Beginning

Middle

End

Pessimism

2ND- Writing 4
Essay Using a Symbol
In this writing assignment, you will incorporate a symbol into a piece of writing. Create a symbol and write
a short essay on what the symbol means. This should be a piece of short fiction using the symbol as the
central focus in the essay or a poem either using the symbol as a focus or describing the symbol's
meaning. Your essay or short fiction should be from five to seven paragraphs long or the poem should be
from twelve to sixteen lines. Be sure you have:





Created a symbol that is appropriate for what it is symbolizing
Expanded the idea of the symbol so that you show many facets of it (A mockingbird in the
novel To Kill a Mockingbird was used because it was helpless and vulnerable and only brought
joy and good feelings to people – a symbol of the situation of African American man, Tom
Robinson living in a Southern town during the 1930's and 40's).
Have a beginning, a middle and an end of in your short fiction—include exposition, rising action,
climax, falling action and resolution.

Your writing will be graded using the NWREL 6+1 rubric. This assignment is worth 70 points.

The Crooked Hat.

The gusts of wind blew from Northwest down to the swaying trees on the eastside.
The sun now cornered to the west climbed down for a deserved rest.
Soon the darkness would envelop the horizon, fires light in the farmhouse
The village quite for readying for yet another the entry of the “Crooked Hat”

In every home fear

THIS PART WILL HELP YOU WITH THE ASSINGEMNTS THAT ARE UNDERNEATH IT:
Since we have been reading literature exploring many different cultures in this course, you are going to
set out on an adventure that will take you thousands of miles and many centuries away. You will explore
the rich history, fairy-tale settings and legendary people that have contributed knowledge, courage, and
insight into the world as we know it in the 21st century! Using your finding, you will write a short story
using what you have learned in the Short Story unit about what makes a good short story.
Since you need good, accurate details to weave into your story, your assignment is to research a
location, time period, and famous person to include in your story. You must include all three
elements in your story. To make it easier, some of the preliminary research has been done for
you. You may choose any of the options below for your location, time period and famous person. (Of
course you know not to mix and match the people, time periods and locations! If you choose Erik the
Red, then you must also use Norway and the 10th century!)
Famo...

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Anonymous
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